Undergraduate Bulletin 2012-14


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

ACCOUNTING

L.ACC-227: Managerial Accounting
A continuation of the study of financial accounting and an introduction to managerial accounting. Topics include the preparation of statement of cash flows, analysis of financial statements, accounting for manufacturing operations, and a study of the internal uses of information for managerial planning, control and decision making. 3 credits.

L.ACC-228: Financial Accounting
A study of the fundamental principles and procedures of financial accounting with an emphasis on preparation of financial statements for external reporting. 3 credits.

L.ACC-331: Intermediate Financial Accounting I
A brief review of basic financial accounting concepts and principles, followed by detailed study of the valuation of various assets and the impact of these valuations on income measurement. Includes a study of compound interest concepts and applications. Emphasis is on concepts, with some consideration of non-GAAP accounting alternatives. Prerequisites: L.ACC-227 and L.ACC-228. 3 credits.

L.ACC-332: Intermediate Financial Accounting II
A continuation of intermediate financial accounting. Topics include long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, dilutive securities and earnings per share, investments, accounting for income taxes, accounting for pensions, accounting for leases, accounting changes and error analysis and the statement of cash flows. Prerequisites: L.ACC-331. 3 credits.

L.ACC-343: Cost Accounting
Principles, procedures and practices of job order, process and standard cost systems. Also included are additional topics related to managerial uses of cost accounting information. Prerequisites: L.ACC-227 and L.ACC-228. 3 credits.

L.ACC-344: Advanced Cost Accounting
Intended to give the student broader knowledge of cost accounting. Emphasis is placed on the use of accounting data in management decision-making. Includes examination of recent conceptual and analytical developments in the area. Prerequisite: L.ACC-343. 3 credits.

L.ACC-350: Accounting Systems
A study of accounting information systems–the elements they contain; the ways in which they are designed and the role they play in supplying information to those who require it. Prerequisites: L.ACC-227, L.ACC-228, and L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111, or L.CIT-115. 3 credits.

L.ACC-352: Accounting for Governmental & Non-Profit Entities
A study of fund accounting with emphasis on governmental entities. Other topics include accounting for hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations, and educational institutions. Prerequisites: L.ACC-331. 3 credits.

L.ACC-394: Accounting Internship
Provides college credit for work experiences related to the major program. Proposals arranged in consultation with Division faculty and approved by Division Chair. Credit varies. Internships cannot be used as accounting electives.

L.ACC-450: Auditing
This course studies auditing theory and practice developed through the study of text material, questions and problems. Emphasis placed on the study of the internal control, audit standards, audit objectives and the preparation of reports. Students also participate in real world audits and complete an electronic major portfolio. Prerequisites: L.ACC-331, L.ACC-332, and L.BUS-250. 3 credits.

L.ACC-455: Federal Income Tax I
A study of federal income tax laws and their application to individuals. Prerequisites: L.ACC-227 and L.ACC-228. 3 credits.

L.ACC-456: Federal Income Tax II
A study of federal income tax laws and their application to partnerships, fiduciaries and corporations. Prerequisite: L.ACC-455. 3 credits.

L.ACC-468: Advanced Financial Accounting
Major emphasis on accounting for business combinations and the preparation of consolidated financial statements. Other topics covered in depth are accounting for derivatives and hedging instruments, and accounting for multinational enterprises. Topics covered in less detail are accounting for branches, reporting for segments of business enterprises, interim reporting, reporting for the Securities and Exchange Commission and accounting for fiduciaries. Prerequisites: L.ACC-331 and 332. 3 credits.

L.ACC-494: Accounting Internship
Provides college credit for work experiences related to the major program. Proposals arranged in consultation with Division faculty and approved by Division Chair. Credit varies. Internships cannot be used as accounting electives.

ART & DIGITAL DESIGN


L.ADD-105: Representational Drawing
This foundation course where students will investigate visual form through the medium of drawing realistic imagery. They will explore the formal elements of line, shape, value and pattern and become familiar with seeing and demonstrating convincingly the relationships among them through a variety of drawing exercises. 3 credits.

L.ADD-110: 2D Design
This studio foundation course will introduce students to basic two-dimensional form, perception, and visual communication theory. Students will begin to explore the elements and principles of design while using a variety of materials and techniques. 3 credits.

L.ADD-150: Mixed Media & Installation Art
This seminar and studio-based course is open to students of all levels that have an interest in studio art. It will introduce students to the historical framework these art forms. Learning will occur in the studio as well as during museum and gallery visits. This strives to broaden students imagination and appreciation, as well as present the challenges of experimentation and interpretation. Mixed Media is a technique of creating an artwork by incorporating two or more media into a single work. Installation art is a technique of creating three-dimensional works of art by combining various elements, especially found objects, into an integrated whole. 3 credits. January term.

L.ADD-175: Video, Animation & Sound
This foundation course introduces creative expression, explorations and techniques for timebased media. Students will create work utilizing sound, video and animation, using a variety of computer applications. 3 credits.

L.ADD-205: Creative Drawing
This is a foundation drawing course which aims at testing a student’s understanding and familiarity with the formal elements of line, shape, value and pattern by experimentations with the artistic manipulation of form. Improvisation and interpretation will be encouraged through a variety of representational and abstract exercises. This course complements and extends, Representational Drawing. Prerequisite: L.ADD 105. 3 credits.

L.ADD-210: Mixed Media & 3D Design
This studio foundation course will explore contemporary three dimensional problem solving through assemblage, installation and mixed media. This course will also explore a variety of technical and conceptual approaches to three-dimensional form. Students will investigate line, shape, space, volume, mass, texture and color as it relates to three-dimensional form. 3 credits.

L.ADD-215: Critical Analysis I
Each course is a one credit, two hour once a week critique session where ADD students are expected to prepare a new work for the purpose of evaluation. Students may take additional courses once the first four sequential courses are completed. At these sessions, all of the ADD faculty will attend and students will have the benefit of the variety of faculty and peer perspectives on individual works of art. Prerequisites: L.ADD-105, L.ADD-110, L.ADD-205, and L.ADD-210. 1 credit.

L.ADD-225: Critical Analysis II
Each course is a one credit, two hour once a week critique session where ADD students are expected to prepare a new work for the purpose of evaluation. Students may take additional courses once the first four sequential courses are competed. At these sessions, all of the ADD faculty will attend and students will have the benefit of the variety of faculty and peer perspectives on individual works of art. Prerequisites: L.ADD-105, L.ADD-110, L.ADD-205, and L.ADD-210. 1 credit.

L.ADD-230: Digital Design: Photoshop & Illustrator
This studio course will teach students the digital imaging software Adobe Photoshop and the vector-based software Adobe Illustrator through a variety of projects. 3 credits.

L.ADD-240: Graphic Design I
This studio course will teach the fundamentals of graphic design with an emphasis on print based form and visual problem solving. Prerequisites: L.ART-140 and L.ADD-230. 3 credits.

L.ADD-250: Interactive Tools & Concepts
An introductory course to the interactive and digital media design focuses on creating interactive experiences that are both functional and engaging. Technical knowledge will cover using Adobe Dreamweaver and Flash software. Prerequisite: L.ADD-230. 3 credits.

L.ADD-315: Critical Analysis III
Each course is a one credit, two hour once a week critique session where ADD students are expected to prepare a new work for the purpose of evaluation. Students may take additional courses once the first four sequential courses are completed. At these sessions, all of the ADD faculty will attend and students will have the benefit of the variety of faculty and peer perspectives on individual works of art. Prerequisites: L.ADD-105, L.ADD-110, L.ADD-205, and L.ADD-210. 1 credit.

L.ADD-325: Critical Analysis IV
Each course is a one credit, two hour once a week critique session where ADD students are expected to prepare a new work for the purpose of evaluation. Students may take additional courses once the first four sequential courses are completed. At these sessions, all of the ADD faculty will attend and students will have the benefit of the variety of faculty and peer perspectives on individual works of art. Prerequisites: L.ADD-105, L.ADD-110, L.ADD-205, and L.ADD-210. 1 credit.

L.ADD-340: Graphic Design II.
This course is designed to build on the design principles introduced in Print Based Form I. Effective visual problem solving and communication will be emphasized through the use of marketing standards, color, creativity and graphic style. Creative package, project administration, as well as client and vendor relationships will also be addressed through a combination of handson experiences and case study analyses. Prerequisites: L.ADD-240. 3 credits.

L.ADD-350: Interactive Multimedia Projects I.
This course introduces and extends the concepts, aesthetics, and techniques critical to the exploration and authoring of screen based interactive art and design works. Technical knowledge will cover advanced techniques of using web authoring tools such as Adobe Dreamweaver, etc. Prerequisite: L.ADD-250. 3 credits.

L.ADD-450: Interactive Multimedia Projects II.
This is an advanced course designed for creating and developing interactive digital media, such as advanced Internet applications, user interface design, and CD-ROM, DVD authoring. Technical knowledge will include using Adobe Flash and Apple Final cut Studio/iLife, etc. Prerequisites: L.ADD-175 and L.ADD-350. 3 credits.

L.ADD-490: Senior Seminar-PJ
This course is designed to assist Art & Digital Design (ADD) students in preparing a mature and cohesive body of creative work. The students will deliver an oral defense of this work as well as develop an artist’s statement and visual portfolio of creative works. The second component of this course is to create an electronic portfolio that will aid the ADD students in demonstrating the transferable knowledge and skills that they have developed through their liberal arts education at Loras College. Lastly, the course provides students with the opportunity to professionally present their strengths and accomplishments through the development of a cover letter and resume. 3 credits. Senior standing required.


ART

L.ART-111: Photomontage & Assemblage
Photomontage and Assemblage is a fine art, studio based course which challenges students to make art by manipulating ready- made images, objects and found materials. The course will focus on transforming printed images and objects, which have a meaning in the context from which they were taken, into new images, giving them new meanings by creatively arranging them in a new context. 3 credits.

L.ART-125: Life Drawing I
A course involving drawing from a live model in a variety of poses emphasizing accuracy and design by utilizing the model as a point of departure. Technical control in a range of media (pencil, charcoal, chalk) is stressed. 3 credits.

L.ART-140: Introduction to Painting
An introductory course in oil or acrylic painting affording one’s own choice of subject matter. Instruction begins at the particular level of accomplishment of each student and attempts to teach basic principles of space, form and color theory as they apply to painting. Also considered are different aspects of painting materials and preparing one’s own painting surface. 3 credits.

L.ART-150: Introduction to Printmaking
An introduction to the use of basic printmaking processes including woodcut, etching-engraving, and silk-screen printing. In addition, some methods of photo/silk screen printing are available. 3 credits.

L.ART-160: Introduction to Sculpture
In this course, students will explore the nature and process of creative thinking. Students combine hands-on studio work with library research on modern sculpture. This research is recorded in a notebook/journal which serves as a resource for the generation and evolution of studio work emphasizing expressive qualities such as aggression, lyricism, monumentality, intimacy and tension/compression. 3 credits.

L.ART-225: Life Drawing II
A continuation of L.ART-125. Prerequisite: L.ART-125. 3 credits.

L.ART-240: Intermediate Painting I
A continuation of L.ART-140 with techniques to aid the student in developing personal means of expression. Prerequisite: L.ART-140. 3 credits.

L.ART-241: Intermediate Painting II
A continuation of L.ART-140 with techniques to aid the student in developing personal means of expression. Prerequisite: L.ART-140. 3 credits.

L.ART-250: Advanced Printmaking I
Study of more complex techniques in intaglio, relief and photo/silk-screen. Color printing techniques and individual approach is stressed. Prerequisite: L.ART-150. 3 credits.

L.ART-251: Advanced Printmaking II
Study of more complex techniques in intaglio, relief and photo/silk-screen. Color printing techniques and individual approach is stressed. Prerequisite: L.ART-150. 3 credits.

L.ART-270: Beginning Drawing-AA
Beginning drawing is a studio course in learning the basics of drawing, in experiencing artistic seeing and decision making, and in reflecting in various ways on one’s artistic experiences. L.ART-270 assumes no prior knowledge of art. Students learn to draw using a variety of techniques with several goals in mind, including an appreciation of both abstraction and realism. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ART-271: Intermediate Drawing
Intermediate drawing is a course which explores creative thinking applied to making works of art. A broad definition of drawing is utilized to establish an open, experimental atmosphere where students work individually on a wide range of projects to include traditional drawing as well as nontraditional media. Much of class time is devoted to discussion and critique. Prerequisite: L.ART-270: Beginning Drawing, or L.AAD-105 Representational Drawing or L.AAD-205: Creative Drawing or L.AAD-110: 2D Design. 3 credits.

L.ART-296: Discover the World of Art History
Art History comes alive as students see and study 20th century painting and sculpture in person as they travel to England and France. This course includes a 12 day travel field experience to Manchester, York, Leeds, Oxford, London, and Paris. Students will examine modern art as they learn to look and analyze work within a historical context and to articulate what they see and experience. Students will visit the National Gallery, Tate Britain and Tate Modern, Saatchi Gallery, Versailles, Louvre, Musée d'Orsay, Musée Rodin, Musée Picasso, and Musée National d'Art Moderne to name a few. They will see works by Monet, Degas, Renoir, Van Gogh, Picasso, Dali, Moore, Goldsworthy, and Hirst. Art and Digital Design majors will be given priority in course enrollment. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.ART-280: Painting Music-AA
This studio course will explore the influence of music on art-making, specifically painting. Students will explore the sensory connections between music and painting, study color theory, experiment with various painting techniques to articulate their personal interpretation, and to create their own analogies to a particular style of music, song or artist. An emphasis will also be placed on imagination and experimentation to create a personal, expanded visual vocabulary as students create acrylic paintings. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ART-325: Advanced Life Drawing I
A continuation of L.ART-225. A creative approach to the human figure and a wider range of media are stressed. Prerequisite: L.ART-225. 3 credits.

L.ART-326: Advanced Life Drawing II
A continuation of L.ART-225. A creative approach to the human figure and a wider range of media are stressed. Prerequisite: L.ART-225. 3 credits.

L.ART-340: Advanced Painting I
Experimentation in new materials as well as oil and acrylic paint. The course stresses research leading to a more personal vocabulary in painting. Prerequisite: L.ART-240, 241. 3 credits.

L.ART-341: Advanced Painting II
Experimentation in new materials as well as oil and acrylic paint. The course stresses research leading to a more personal vocabulary in painting. Prerequisite: L.ART-240, 241. 3 credits.

L.ART-440: Advanced Painting III
Experimentation in new materials as well as oil and acrylic paint. The course stresses research leading to a more personal vocabulary in painting. Prerequisite: L.ART-240, 241. 3 credits.

L.ART-441: Advanced Painting IV
Experimentation in new materials as well as oil and acrylic paint. The course stresses research leading to a more personal vocabulary in painting. Prerequisite: L.ART-240, 241. 3 credits.

L.ART-371: Advanced Drawing
A continuation of L.ART-271, concentrating on more advanced problems, techniques and experimentation. Prerequisite: L.ART-271. 3 credits.

ATHLETIC TRAINING

L.ATR-130: Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries
In this course, students are introduced to the role of the athletic trainer and the prevention of athletic injuries. Administrative and practical methods to prevent injuries common in the allied health care fields will be discussed. Additionally, the use of Evidence Based Medicine will be introduced to help students understand which techniques will best prevent injuries. 3 credits.

L.ATR-150: Medical Terminology & Pharmacology
This course offers an introduction to learning both medical and technical vocabulary by focusing on the Latin and Greek elements in English words. One of the primary purposes of this course is to teach the student how to determine the meaning of a scientific word by breaking down its structure in terms of prefix, stem or stems, and suffix. As an added benefit, students will acquire a lasting fascination with words and their origins. This course also focuses on providing a foundation into the legal concerns, pharmacokinetics and terminology of common medications in the allied healthcare fields. 3 credits.

L.ATR-280: Athletic Training Clinical I
Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the sophomore level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved, if placed at an off campus site. Prerequisite: admission to athletic training major. 1 credit.

L.ATR-281: Athletic Training Clinical II
Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the sophomore level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved, if placed at an off campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-280. 1 credit.

L.ATR-290: Evaluation of Athletic Injuries I
Introduction to athletic injury evaluation and assessment of conditions affecting the lower extremity. Provides special instruction in medical terminology. Prerequisites: L.ATR-130 and admission to the athletic training major. 3 credits.

L.ATR-291: Evaluation of Athletic Injuries II
Introduction to athletic injury evaluation and assessment of conditions affecting the upper extremity. Prerequisite: L.ATR-290. 3 credits.

L.ATR-380: Athletic Training Clinical III
Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the junior level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved, if placed at an off campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-281. 1 credit.

L.ATR-381: Athletic Training Clinical IV
Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the junior level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved, if placed at an off campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-380. 1 credit.

L.ATR-382: Therapeutic Modalities
Methods and techniques in the application of selected therapeutic modalities and athletic injury treatment relative to modality usage. Laboratory component. Prerequisite: L.ATR-130 or L.SSC-140. 3 credits.

L.ATR-383: Therapeutic Exercise
Methods and techniques in the selection and application of rehabilitation techniques in sports medicine. Laboratory component. Prerequisite: L.ATR-130 or L.SSC-140. 3 credits.

L.ATR-455: Advanced Care & Prevention
This course emphasizes general medical conditions of athletes, including; dermatology, nutrition, injuries and illnesses, cardiology, pharmacology and the female triad. Prerequisites: L.ATR-291. Athletic Training majors only. 3 credits.

L.ATR-480: Organization & Administration in Athletic Training
This course provides experience in athletic training administration, including the opportunity to plan, coordinate, and supervise all administrative components of an athletic training program for the high school, college, or professional athletic organization. Prerequisites: L.ATR-130. Athletic training majors only. 3 credits.

L.ATR-482: Athletic Training Clinical V
Clinical education practical hours in the athletic training room for the senior level student. Clinical experiences are provided in a variety of athletic training settings utilizing Loras College Approved Clinical Instructors. Student is responsible for transportation and fees involved, if placed at an off campus site. Prerequisite: L.ATR-381. 1 credit.

L.ATR-483: Athletic Training Clinical VI-PJ
This course will allow athletic training students the opportunity to reflect on their liberal arts education both within the athletic training education program as well as their general education opportunities at Loras College. The course will give the students several prompts from which they will relate their educational growth and experiences within the College mission statement. Additionally students will produce an electronic portfolio which will include a resume appropriate for a post graduate position that demonstrates their capabilities in the competencies and proficiencies written by Executive Education Committee of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Prerequisite: L.ATR-482. 1 credit.

BIOLOGY

L.BIO-100: Population Biology
This course explores both theoretical and practical approaches to understanding populations of resident bird populations during the winter. Students will use mist nets to capture wild birds and will learn to identify, band, and measure common species. Mark-recapture computer models will be used to estimate population sizes and survival probabilities of selected species, during this intensive, three-week field project. This course is intended for students with an interest in, environmental science, or wildlife conservation. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.BIO-115: Principles of Biology I
This is the first of a two-semester sequence to introduce fundamental principles of biology (designed primarily for science majors). An investigative-inquiry approach is employed with emphases on molecular cell biology, development, genetics, and physiology. Three lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Can be taken before or after L.BIO-116. 4 credits.

L.BIO-116: Principles of Biology II
This is the second of a two-semester sequence to introduce fundamental principles of biology (designed primarily for science majors). An investigative-inquiry approach is employed with emphases on evolution, ecology and biodiversity. Three lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Can be taken before or after L.BIO-115. 4 credits.

L.BIO-220: Microbiology
A basic course in microbiology stressing growth processes, culturing techniques, the role of microorganisms in disease and their control and applied microbiology. Prerequisite: L.BIO-115 and 116 or equivalent. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-222: Evolution in Darwin's Culture
This course is an in-depth introduction to the fundamentals of evolution and an exploration of cultural conflicts that arose because of the idea of evolution. The Origin of Species was published by Charles Darwin in 1859 and immediately started the first worldwide scientific debate. At this time in Victorian England the connections between science and nearly every other aspect of culture were becoming increasingly evident, and there was great tension about the role that science should play in a modern, industrial society. This course uses the "Reacting to the Past" experiential, role-playing game format where students will be reading, writing, and speaking from the perspective of a person in this time and place. The scientific and cultural issues of the time that will be discussed include natural selection and design; implications of Darwinism for: social reform, racial theories, and women's rights; professionalization of science; and inductive/deductive reasoning. Cultural conflicts related to evolution have continued today even after years of verification of Darwin's ideas. In the last week of the class, students will read and discuss a book on modern evolutionary facts, comparing it to Darwin's writings, creationism, and Intelligent Design. Has the debate changed in modern culture? Prerequisites: L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.BIO-230: Invertebrate Zoology
An introduction to the diversity of invertebrate animals, stressing taxonomy, structure, life history and evolution. Prerequisite: L.BIO-116 or equivalent. Two lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 3 credits.

L.BIO-231: Vertebrate Zoology
An introduction to the basic principles of ichthyology, herpetology, ornithology and mammalogy emphasizing life histories of local vertebrates. Laboratory experiences include use of identification keys, collection and preservation of specimens, and field observations. Course fee assessed for trip to Mississippi River Museum. Prerequisite: L.BIO-116 or equivalent. Two lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 3 credits.

L.BIO-235: Plants & Human Health
This course is designed to help students articulate the role of plants in human health and well-being in both historical and modern contexts. Over time, the human ability to manipulate and use plants has become increasingly sophisticated;. The major themes that students will explore during this course will be the role of plants in human nutrition and food security, human health and medicinal, psychoactive and hallucinogenic plants, biotechnology and alternative medicine. A wide variety of laboratory projects and travel within the Dubuque area as well as to Madison will reinforce the various themes covered during the class sessions. Prerequisites: An introductory course in biology. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.BIO-240: Plant Biology
A course designed to introduce students to the basic biology of members of the Plant Kingdom, primarily the vascular plants. Major topical coverage will include evolution, reproduction, physiology, anatomy, developmental morphology, ecology and systematics. Minor topical coverage will include discussion of other photosynthetic groups and plan allies. Prerequisite: L.BIO-116 or equivalent. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-242: Microbes-AH
This course is designed to furnish students with a basic knowledge of Microbiology and its impact on humans. Students will design their own experiments and, through the example of Microbiology, explore the strengths and weaknesses of this approach for problem solving. Topics will include the role of microorganisms in disease, body defenses against microbes, and the impact of microbes on human history, biotechnology, and germ warfare. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Math Modeling (-FM) course. 3 credits.

L.BIO-250: Genetics
An introduction to the principles of Mendelian and biochemical genetics. Prerequisite: L.BIO-115 or equivalent. Three lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-255: Evolution
An introduction to the principles of organic evolution, mechanistic origins of life and diversity. Concepts of natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow and mutation are used to explain changes in gene frequency. One three-hour lecture period per week. 3 credits.

L.BIO-259: Issues in Environmental Biology-AH
This course will give students hands-on experience in learning the science behind several current environmental issues like clear-cutting, species diversity, erosion control, water quality, prairie habitat restoration, urban sprawl, or neotropical bird migration. Outdoor and indoor projects will be used to help students learn how science is used to make decisions about various issues in environmental biology. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.BIO-260: Human Anatomy & Physiology-AH
A course designed for non-biology majors that investigates everyday structure and normal function of the human systems. In addition, some common diseases, the role of genes, health issues and interactions with our environment will be discussed. Other topics may include the biology of cancer, AIDS, and effects of alcohol and drugs upon bodily function. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-265: Issues in Bird Biology-AH
This is a student-centered, active learning based course on basic bird biology; students will generate questions about aspects of bird biology and use the scientific method, computers, scientific equipment, statistical analysis and basic field sampling techniques to collect data and test hypotheses about birds in their natural outdoor environment and/or caged birds; students will learn basic identification, behavior, ecology, and controversial environmental issues of birds; students will spend at least 6 class periods outside observing, identifying and collecting data from local bird populations. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course.

L.BIO-270: Human Exercise: Measurements & Limits-AH
Students will be working in groups to pose questions about human exercise, predict their outcome, measure the body's response to exercise with various equipment and then interpret its meaning and application from the experimental output. Thus, students will be immersed in the scientific method, learning to do science and applying it to everyday exercise. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course, and one college-level science course. 4 credits.

L.BIO-272: Biology of Women-AH
This course is a study of basic biological principles in the context of the unique biology of women. Areas of study include what it means biologically to be female, reproductive anatomy and physiology, genetics and development, women and cancer, pregnancy, infertility, contraception, menopause, and research biases in the study of women’s health. Lab experiments will focus on using the scientific method and explorations in developmental biology. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.BIO-273: Human Genetics-AH
This course will help students understand the importance and impact of genetics in their lives. Topics will include genetic testing and prenatal diagnosis, genetic engineering, use of DNA evidence in the courts, and eugenics. Labs will include use of PCR and Gel electrophoresis in DNA fingerprinting, genetic engineering and testing for genetically modified foods. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 3 credits.

L.BIO-279: Experimental Design & Biostatistics-AH
Students will learn the hypothetico-deductive methods of science and experimental design, and the appropriate statistical means to evaluate these outcomes. The course involves the design and implementation of a semester-long group research project culminating in a formal scientific paper or poster presentation. Students will learn to use computer software to gain competence in common statistical applications, such as z- and t-tests, analysis of variance (one-way and factorial), correlation and regression analysis, and chi-square tests of frequency distributions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Math Modeling (-FM) course, as well as one college-level biology course (L.BIO-115 or L.BIO-116). Three one-hour lecture periods (covering statistics) and one two-hour laboratory (research) period per week. 3 credits.

L.BIO-300: Intensive Science Research Experience
This is an in-depth course designed to give students majoring in one of the sciences an intense, full-time research experience in their sub-discipline. The intensive research experiences will allow the student to perform experiments toward novel scientific findings, not simply a pre-packaged lab with the results already determined. Topics to be covered in the seminars include: Why are controls so important in research? How do I evaluate if research I read or hear about in the news is valid and sound scientifically? How do I read a scientific research paper? Prerequisites: L.BIO-115, and consent of mentor and instructor. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.BIO-310: Animal Behavior
This is a seminar course designed to explore current topics in the area of animal behavior in the context of evolutionary theory. Topics may include mate choice, parental care, group formation, or habitat selection, with emphasis on birds and mammals. Students will learn to read and critically evaluate articles from the primary literature, and will be responsible for leading class discussion on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: L.LIB-110, L.BIO-110 or L.PSY-101 or higher. 2 credits.

L.BIO-315: Bird Conservation in South Texas
This course is a 14 day study travel field course in south Texas. Students will visit 12 different regional and national wildlife refuges as well as private sanctuaries that contain unique habitat and bird species that depend on these habitats. They will talk directly with wildlife managers in these areas to get answers to student questions and understand the challenges that these people and birds face each day. Each student will learn basic bird identification, current conservation issues and ecology at each of the sites. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.BIO-320: Subtropical Ecology
This course consists of a two-week field trip (lecture/laboratory) to several subtropical natural communities in Florida. Study sites and topics include, exotic plant biology and management, migratory birds, cypress and mangrove swamp biology, Everglades, water resource management, and intertidal zone and coral reef biology of the Keys. Prerequisites: One college biology course and permission of the instructor. An additional fee will be charged for transportation, meals and campsite costs. 2 credits.

L.BIO-325: Environmental Issues in Costa Rica
This course is a 12 day study travel field course in Costa Rica. Students will visit and compare three different forest ecosystems: tropical wet forest, tropical dry forest, and high elevation tropical cloud forest. Environmental issues including hydroelectric power, rainforest logging, agricultural land use, coffee production, , and maintenance of biodiversity will be discussed . Prerequisite: introductory course in biology. Not open to first year students. Additional fee charged for travel, lodging, food and activity costs. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.BIO-330: Evolutionary Ecology
This course investigates the relationships between organisms and their physical and biological environments. Both theoretical and experimental approaches will be used to examine factors regulating populations and the structuring of natural communities and ecosystems. Prerequisite: L.BIO-115 and 116 or equivalent; L.BIO-279 highly recommended. Three lecture or discussion periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-345: Neurobiology
An introduction to regulatory homeostasis as mediated by the vertebrate nervous system with emphases on cellular communication, formation of neural circuits and afferent-interneuron efferent pathways. Implications of neurotransmitter imbalance during disease and various mental disorders is also discussed. Two lecture periods per week. Prerequisite: L.BIO-115 or equivalent. 3 credits.

L.BIO-348: Immunology
This course will provide a basic overview of the human immune system, including both innate and adaptive immunity and the recent discoveries on the interaction of the two systems. The topics will include: immune cell functions, antibody production and function, immune response to infectious diseases (AIDS, others), allergies, and vaccine and transplant biology. Defects of the immune system leading to autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies will also be discussed. Lectures and class discussions, including many case studies and "Disease Fridays" will be utilized to meet course objectives. Prerequisite: L.BIO-115. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.BIO-365: Human Anatomy
A course on the detailed structure of the human body, including systems, organs and tissues. Prerequisite: L.BIO-110 or 115 or equivalent. Open to seniors only – instructor permission required. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-375: Conservation Biology-AH
This course examines basic concepts of biological conservation. Topics include structure and function of ecosystems and threats to global biodiversity, including environmental degradation, extinction, and exotic species introductions. Students will use computer simulations and field techniques to learn effective conservation practices. One lecture period and one four-hour laboratory/field period per week. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.BIO-389: Junior Seminar
Develops communication skills, both written and oral, for the dissemination of research in the biological sciences. Assignment of thesis advisor and signed approval of introduction, materials and methods and literature cited sections required to receive credit. Prerequisite: L.BIO-279 and declared biology or biological research major. Prerequisites may be modified to accommodate Honors Program students. 1 credit.

L.BIO-392: Field Experience
This course gives credit for shadowing professionals in the work place. Students usually do only observation for a total of 45 hours per semester. Can be taken only once for credit. Liability insurance must be checked before placement. Prerequisite: junior standing. Hours of participation are arranged between student and mentor. 1 credit.

L.BIO-400: Senior Thesis Research
Intensive research project and written thesis. Required for all biology research majors. Prerequisite: L.BIO-389. 1 credit..

L.BIO-401: Honors Senior Thesis Research
Intensive individual research project and written thesis terminating with a presentation of results at a regional, national or international scientific forum. Prerequisite: L.BIO-389. 1 credit.

L.BIO-410: Cell & Molecular Biology
A study of the cellular basis of life processes, particularly the molecular, macromolecular, organelle and intercellular structural and functional interrelations. The structure, assembly and functions of macromolecular organelles will also be investigated. Prerequisites: L.BIO-115 or equivalent and L.CHE-233. Three lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-420: Vertebrate Physiology
A course in the basic physiological processes of humans and other vertebrates. The function and coordination of cells, organs and systems of human and some vertebrates are studied. Prerequisites: L.BIO-110, 115 or 116; L.CHE-233. Three lecture periods and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.BIO-489: Senior Seminar
Presentation of thesis research for the biological research major; presentation of selected topic of current interest for the biology major. Prerequisite: L.BIO-279 and senior standing. 1 credit.

BUSINESS

L.BUS-110: Introduction to Business
A course designed to acquaint prospective accounting or business majors with the many aspects of a career in the business world. This course will not count toward Divisional elective credit, but will count toward the 120 hours required for graduation. First year students only. 3 credits.

L.BUS-115: Business Tours
Targeted towards first and second year students (business and non-business majors), this course will provide an overview on how businesses work and what business people do. Students will learn how the external environment of a business can affect its success or failure. Students will learn how business professionals are influenced by the technological, political, legal, socio-cultural, competitive and economic environments. This course will not count for elective credit in any of the business majors. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.BUS-230: Principles of Management
A general introduction to a distinct process existing in the business organization. Emphasis is placed upon fundamental managerial concepts such as decision making and coordination, managerial planning, organizing and authority relationships, and the nature of controlling in management. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.BUS-240: Principles of Marketing
A managerial approach that integrates the theory and concepts a marketing manager must comprehend in order to make effective decisions. Special attention is given to the areas of product, place, promotion and pricing. 3 credits.

L.BUS-250: Business Statistics
An introduction to basic statistical measurements: sampling theory, including estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing and basic decision theory. Other topics include correlation analysis, time series analysis, seasonal fluctuations, trend fitting, and cyclical measurement. Prerequisite: L.MAT-113 or above. 3 credits.

L.BUS-260: Morals and Money-AV
‘What is right, and what is wrong? What are my values? How do my values impact my decisions?’ This class will answer these questions by examining three distinct topics where money and morals/ethics are intertwined. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, LIB-110 and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.BUS-317: Business Law I
A study of the foundations of legal systems, of the role of business ethics and corporate social responsibility, of the formation and operation of contracts, and of the laws regarding negligence, property and government regulation of business. 3 credits.

L.BUS-331: Organizational Behavior
This course explores the roles of the employee within the organizational structure. Case studies are examined to show the theoretical and actual applications of the text material. Topics include leadership, motivation, interpersonal and group dynamics, stress, communication and the union’s role in the organization. Prerequisite: L.BUS-230. 3 credits.

L.BUS-333: Entrepreneurial Experience
This course studies entrepreneurship as a process of economic and/or social value creation, rather than the single event of opening a business. Reflecting on recent research, the course focuses on opportunity recognition, assembly of the financial and human resources needed to develop the idea, and launching the new venture. Prerequisite: L.BUS-230. 3 credits.

L.BUS-335: Human Resource Management
An intensive study of the field of management which is concerned with planning, organizing and controlling the functions of procuring, developing, maintaining and utilizing a labor force. Prerequisite: L.BUS-230. 3 credits.

L.BUS-343: Marketing Management
This course explores the problems confronting marketing managers in the formation of marketing policies using an experiential-based approach to the comprehensive study and analysis. Active learning assignments, a marketing simulation and a marketing plan may be included in the course. Active learning assignments, a marketing simulation and a marketing plan may be included in the course. Prerequisite: L.BUS-240. 3 credits.

L.BUS-344: Sales Management
An application of the management approach to an analysis of the sales executive’s duties, responsibilities and role as decision-maker. The course explores the areas of recruiting, training, compensating, motivating and evaluating a sales force. Prerequisites: L.BUS-230 and 240. 3 credits.

L.BUS-345: Retail Administration
Survey of retailing and its role in distribution. Management policy areas studied include administrative organization, locational decisions, buying, pricing, merchandising, sales promotion, personnel and overall planning and coordination in retailing firms. Analysis of illustrative cases. Prerequisites: L.BUS-230 and 240. 3 credits.

L.BUS-346: Advertising/Marketing Communications
Introduces students to advertising’s/marketing communication’s role as a vital tool in the distribution of goods and services. It is structured to meet the needs of those wishing to secure a solid foundation for further work in the field as well as aiding those who seek a basic knowledge of the place of advertising/marketing communication in the business and social environment. Prerequisite: L.BUS-240. 3 credits.

L.BUS-348: International Marketing
This course provides a global orientation to the study of marketing. The cultural environment of the global marketer is reviewed throughout every area of the course. All marketing decisions are studied through an understanding and appreciation of different cultures. Within this context, the course will cover how to assess global marketing opportunities and how to develop global marketing strategies. Prerequisite: L.BUS-240. 3 credits.

L.BUS-349: Consumer Behavior
Provides the student with a usable, managerial understanding of consumer behavior, particularly as it relates to sales, marketing, advertising and promotion management. Consumers are studied in four ways: as individuals, as decision-makers, as members of a group, and as members of a culture. Prerequisite: L.BUS-240. 3 credits.

L.BUS-350: Principles of Finance
An introductory course covering the principles of business financial management focusing on the tools of financial management, the financial environment, working capital management, capital budgeting, the cost of capital and capital structure decisions. Prerequisites: L.ACC-227 and L.ACC-228; L.MAT-113 or above. 3 credits.

L.BUS-352: Investments
An introductory course covering the principles of security analysis and valuation of stocks and bonds. An in depth study of the value and growth approach to investing. Students will be responsible for best practice readings from the world of finance along with several projects and research assignments designed to increase their understanding of security analysis. Prerequisite: L.BUS-350. 3 credits.

L.BUS-353: Financial Institutions
An overview of financial markets, financial institutions and how those institutions impact flow and cost of funds through the domestic and global economy. Markets include money markets, capital markets, primary and secondary markets, mortgage markets, stock, bond and derivative markets as well as international currency markets. Institutions include commercial banks, credit unions, savings institutions, pension funds, life insurance companies, mutual funds, and investment banks. Prerequisites: L.BUS-350 or instructor approval. 3 credits.

L.BUS-354: Personal Financial Planning
This course overviews personal financial planning issues and tools with topics that include goal setting, managing cash and budgeting, taxes, wise use of credit, purchasing decisions, risk management, investments and retirement and estate planning. Personal ethics and values in personal finance will also be addressed. The course is targeted to both business and non-business majors. Students desiring finance major elective credit should consult the instructor. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. 3 credits.

L.BUS-358: L.I.F.E: Portfolio Applications I
This course applies financial theory to the actual management of an investment portfolio for the Loras College endowment, combining lecture and independent research, with heavy emphasis on outside projects. Students learn the basics of security research and analysis and the interpretation and application of economic data to investment management decisions. Students present their methodology, reasons and results to the administration or board of regents. Prerequisite: L.BUS-352 and instructor permission. 3 credits.

L.BUS-360: Business As A Calling
This course integrates the principles of Catholic Social Teaching into decisions that business professionals make about the daily operations and future of their business and their own individual professional development and career plans. Students will explore the discussion of work as a job, work as a career, and work as a vocation. 3 credits.

L.BUS-370: International Business
An introduction to issues facing organizations in a global economy. Includes a study of the environmental factors affecting international business; the economic theories behind international trade, development and investment; and the strategies and structure of multinational enterprises. 3 credits.

L.BUS-379: The Rise & Fall of the Irish Tiger-AC
Much has been written about the economic rollercoaster the Irish economy has experienced over the last 30 years. This course will use the "Celtic Tiger" as a gateway into looking at not only the history of the Irish economy, but as a way to define, compare and contrast culture through an economic lens. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.BUS-394: Business Internship
Provides college credit for work experiences related to the major program. Proposals arranged in consultation with Division faculty and approved by Division Chair. Credit varies. Internships cannot be used for electives in the business majors or minors. Multiple credits.

L.BUS-418: Business Law II
Topics include the law of partnerships and corporations, sales contracts, negotiable instruments, secured transactions, bankruptcy, agency, insurance, and trusts and estates. Not Open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.BUS-432: Operations Management
This course is designed to acquaint students with the long-run and short-run problems that must be solved in managing the operations function of both manufacturing and service industry firms. Major problem areas including plant location; process design; technology selection; production scheduling; product quality and factor allocation are examined and decisions rendered employing both quantitative and graphic methods. Prerequisites: L.BUS-230, 250 and L.MAT-113 or above. 3 credits.

L.BUS-433: Global Leadership
Leadership has been frequently heralded by writers and executives as the key to sustained competitive advantage on the part of U.S. organizations. In addition, it is clear that the possession of leadership qualities and the display of leader behavior are requirements for individuals attempting to progress in their careers. It is important for aspiring managers to learn about the nature of effective leadership and how they can develop their own competencies in this area. Students in this course will explore issues of leadership and change associated with the growth in the international marketplace. This course will examine a variety of business and leadership practices with emphasis on global organizational values, business plans, diversity, challenges, and culturally appropriate strategies for success in the rapidly changing world of international and multinational business. Prerequisite: L.BUS-230. 3 credits.

L.BUS-447: Marketing Research
A comprehensive and practical study of the full range of activities involved in marketing research in business and other organizations. The entire research process is examined through the completion of a formal research project. Prerequisites: L.BUS-240 and 250. 3 credits.

L.BUS-451: Intermediate Financial Management
This course is an intensive study of corporate financial management. The emphasis is on a detailed in-depth analysis of various topics of corporate financial management including risk analysis, capital asset pricing model, valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure decisions and cost of capital. Cases, both individual and group will be used to assess student mastery of these topics. The changing values of corporate governance and social responsibility are also discussed. Prerequisite: L.BUS-350. 3 credits.

L.BUS-458: L.I.F.E: Portfolio Applications II
Continuation of L.BUS-358. Students will be responsible for the management and performance of the investment portfolio. Duties will include determining economic conditions, formulating the asset and sector allocations, researching and investing in individual securities that fit the parameters of the class model, monitoring performance results in comparison to the appropriate benchmark, and executing purchases and sales when appropriate. Prerequisites: L.BUS-358 and instructor permission. Not for finance elective credit. 3 credits.

L.BUS-461: Human Resource Selection & Evaluation
Design and implementation of an effective selection and performance evaluation program including: role of job analysis; reliability and validity of human resource measures; description and evaluation of selection instruments (application form, reference check, interview and tests) and performance evaluation methods; legal and ethical issues. Prerequisite: L.BUS-335. 3 credits.

L.BUS-488: Business Policies
Designed to develop skill in identifying problems, analyzing them, devising realistic solutions and making oral and written presentations of the results. A computer simulation is also utilized. Prerequisites: completion of the Business Administration core courses, and senior standing. 3 credits.

L.BUS-490: Business Seminar
This course brings together students from all the business disciplines to collaborate and work through problems and challenges of working in today’s business world as part of a business team in a business simulation. Additionally, students will model the best practices of leading executives and businesses by planning, leading and taking part in local community service projects. Finally, students will meet and network with local, regional and national business professionals. Requirements: Senior Status and Major in Finance, Management, Marketing, MIS, or General Business. 3 credits. Dependent upon staff and demand.

L.BUS-494: Business Internship
Provides college credit for work experiences related to the major program. Proposals arranged in consultation with Division faculty and approved by Division Chair. Credit varies. Internships cannot be used for electives in the business majors or minors.

CATHOLIC STUDIES

L.CTL-130: Human Dignity & Human Rights-MC
This course will examine the lives and creative output of three twentieth-century American Catholics: Flannery O’Connor (1925-1964), Dorothy Day (1897-1980), and Fulton Sheen (1895-1979). We will attempt to uncover these individuals’ convictions about sacramentality, mediation, and communion. We will investigate how they were shaped by Catholic perspectives and American culture and how they shaped Catholic perspectives and American culture. We will pay special attention to the claims made by each of these individuals about human dignity and human rights. Prerequisite: L.CTL-100 or L.HON-100.

L.CTL-260: Martyrs, Mendicants & Masterpieces-AC
The course focuses on the culture of pre-Constantinian Christian Rome, medieval Franciscan Assisi, and Renaissance Florence. We will study the customs and artifacts of each period to determine how they affected the development of Christian thought and practice. We will examine how cultural traditions formed and changed, and how these traditions affected social organization, religion, and everyday life. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.CTL-261: Catholicism Encounters Modernity-AC
This course will investigate attributes of the cultural landscape, from the time of the French Revolution until the present, that influenced the Catholic Church’s self-understanding and its articulation of its relationship with the wider world. We will explore the customs, rules, and language that shaped the Catholic Church’s internal discourse and influenced its exchange with the world outside its boundaries. The course will take students to visit sites in Paris, Lyon, and Rome which provide insight into the Church’s posture toward modernity throughout the 19th, 20th, and early 21st centuries. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.CTL-490: Leadership Seminar for Social Justice
The purpose of this course is to help students to assume increasingly responsible leadership roles in their personal, professional, and religious lives. The course will focus on significant theories of leadership, Catholic teaching on social justice and the implications of these two concentrations for effective communication, challenging poverty, and promoting social change. The course will also include an opportunity for hands-on experience in which leadership will be put into action. 2 credits.

CHEMISTRY

L.CHE-111: General Chemistry I
The fundamental principles of chemistry and the properties of the more familiar elements and compounds are studied, chiefly in light of the periodic system and the theory of atomic structure. Major topics include: stoichiometry, energy, atomic structure, radiochemistry, bonding, gases, solids and solutions. Recommended: 3 years of high school mathematics including Algebra II. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.CHE-112: General Chemistry II
A continuation of L.CHE-111. The fundamental principles of chemistry and the properties of the more familiar elements and compounds are studied. Major topics include: kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry. Prerequisite: L.CHE-111. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.CHE-114: Chemistry for Engineers
Major topics include: molecular structure and bonding, physical states of matter, chemical reaction mechanisms, modern materials and their application in engineering, kinetics and thermodynamics, electrochemistry and the use of the scientific method. Prerequisite: L.MAT-113 or above, high school chemistry. Three lectures, one recitation and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 5 credits.

L.CHE-150: Career Options in Science
Students in this class will explore career options open to science majors. Students will prepare summaries of career information from a variety of sources including on-line, CEL materials, reference literature, and interviews of practicing professionals. Several tour/field trips to local or regional sites where science professionals practice are required. Course fee applies. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.CHE-151: Chemistry of Forensics
This course will provide an in-depth introduction to forensic science with an emphasis in forensic chemistry. The topics include: handling data, collection of physical evidence, identification of evidence, characterization of glass and soil evidence, examination of hairs, fibers, and paints, drug analysis, serology, fingerprint detection, and document analysis. This course will focus on the chemical basis behind the forensic techniques used in crime labs and the analysis of physical evidence. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.CHE-152: From Caveman to Scientist
From the discovery of fire to the production of antibiotics and polymeric materials, how did each great advance in technology lead to the next great advance and ultimately to modern society? Each day we will explore one of the great advances: fire, ceramics, metallurgy, electricity, fermentation, synthetic chemistry, polymers. The class will be a mix of hands on discovery activities, mini-lectures with discussion, and team based inquiries into historical information. Course fee applies. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.CHE-200: Intensive Science Research Experience
This is an in-depth course designed to give students majoring in one of the sciences an intense, full-time research experience in their sub-discipline. The intensive research experiences will allow the student to perform experiments toward novel scientific findings, not simply a pre-packaged lab with the results already determined. Topics to be covered in the seminars include: Why are controls so important in research? How do I evaluate if research I read or hear about in the news is valid and sound scientifically? How do I read a scientific research paper? Prerequisites: L.CHE-111, and consent of mentor and instructor. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.CHE-203: The Science of Paintings
This course will explore some of the basic principles of science and apply of those principles to understand the physical and chemical nature of paints, pigments, and dyes. In the technological realm, scientists and artists both explore ways to manipulate matter to achieve desired ends. Both generate and analyze solutions to problems using creativity and imagination. We will explore the creation process by using science to create our own artistic materials. Includes a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.CHE-225: Quantitative Analysis
A study of the principles of quantitative analytical chemistry and the application of these principles to gravimetric, volumetric, electro-analytical and spectroscopic analyses. Prerequisite: L.CHE-112. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. 4 credits.

L.CHE-233: Organic Chemistry I
This course deals with structure, reaction mechanisms and properties of carbon compounds, focusing on the chemistry of the hydrocarbons. The theory is illustrated in the laboratory by the preparation and identification of typical organic compounds. Prerequisite: L.CHE-112. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits.

L.CHE-234: Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of Chemistry 233. This course deals with structure, reaction mechanisms and properties of carbon compounds, focusing on the chemistry of organic functional groups. The theory is illustrated in the laboratory by the preparation and identification of typical organic compounds. Prerequisite: L.CHE-233. Three lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week for chemistry majors (5 credits) and three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week (4 credits) for non-majors.

L.CHE-260: The Chemistry of Art-AH
This course is about intersection of chemistry with the visual arts. Chemistry and art share some common ground. Chemists and artists both explore ways to manipulate matter in order to achieve desired ends. Both generate and analyze solutions to problems using creativity and imagination. We will learn how chemistry and art are connected by exploring how chemistry is used in the perception, creation, restoration and preservation of works of art. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110 and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.CHE-261: Nutrition- You are What You Eat-AH
An introduction to the ways scientists acquire information and how society and individuals can make use of this information. The focus will be on nutrition and the chemical nature of foods, as well as, the effects of nutrition and food safety on health. There will be discussions of topics in the news such as “Obesity and Fast Foods,” “Anti-oxidants,” and “Genetically Modified Crops.” The class will meet twice each week for 135 minutes each session, Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.CHE-262: Global Warming- Fact or Fiction-AH
The scientific method will be used to explore the impact and assess the importance of human activities and natural events on recent increases in Earth's average global temperature. Potential consequences of this global phenomenon for future generations and us will be explored. Actions that might prevent these changes, as well as the potential economic impact of these actions on society will also be studied. Students will collect and analyze data directly. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.CHE-263: Energy & Water-AH
The availability of clean water and energy are critical to our quality of life. This course will deal with the chemistry involved with water, water pollution, and water purification. Students will collect water from various sources and test them for various contaminants. The advantages and disadvantages of various sources of energy (fossil, nuclear, fuel cell, hydrogen, etc.) will also be discussed. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.CHE-295: Topics
Subjects, prerequisites and credits to be announced.

L.CHE-300: Intensive Science Research Experience
This is an in-depth course designed to give students majoring in one of the sciences an intense, full-time research experience in their sub-discipline. The intensive research experiences will allow the student to perform experiments toward novel scientific findings, not simply a pre-packaged lab with the results already determined. Topics to be covered in the seminars include: Why are controls so important in research? How do I evaluate if research I read or hear about in the news is valid and sound scientifically? How do I read a scientific research paper? Prerequisites: L.CHE-111, and consent of mentor and instructor. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.CHE-335: Introductory Biochemistry
The structures, function, synthesis and metabolism of proteins, fats, sugars, and genetic material will be studied. Interrelationships and control within the cell will be emphasized. Prerequisite: L.CHE-233. Recommended: L.BIO-110 or 115. Three lectures per week (3 credits) or three lectures and one three-hour laboratory (4 credits).

L.CHE-350: Biophysical Chemistry
This course treats systematically the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry from a biochemical perspective. An extended treatment is given of the properties and structure of gases, the laws of thermodynamics, the physical transformations of pure substances, the properties of mixtures, phase and chemical equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: L.CHE-112; L.MAT-150 or above; L.PHY-210 and L.PHY-211, or L.PHY-223 and L.PHY-224. 4 credits.

L.CHE-351: Physical Chemistry
This course treats systematically the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. An extended treatment is given of the properties and structure of gases, the laws of thermodynamics, the physical transformations of pure substances, the properties of mixtures, phase and chemical equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-112; L.MAT-150, 160 or 170; L.PHY-210 and L.PHY-211, or L.PHY-223 and L.PHY-224. 4 credits.

L.CHE-352: Quantum Chemistry
Continuation of L.CHE-351. An extended treatment is given of quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular structure and spectra, crystal structure and x-ray diffraction, transport processes and chemical kinetics. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-350 or L.CHE-351. 4 credits.

L.CHE-381: Polymer Chemistry
A study of the organic chemistry and physical chemistry of natural and synthetic high polymers. Topics covered include the synthesis of polymers, thermodynamics and kinetics of polymerization and the characterization and testing of polymers. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-234, and L.CHE-350 or 351, which may be taken concurrently. 4 credits.

L.CHE-389: Junior Seminar
Chemistry and Biochemistry majors, staff and visiting scientists will give reports on new developments in the field of chemistry. 1 credit per year.

L.CHE-446: Instrumental Analysis
An advanced course in analytical chemistry stressing the use of instrumental methods. Application of the techniques of infrared, ultraviolet, atomic absorption and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to chemical analyses is made. It also includes analyses based on potentiometric, amperiometric, conductometric and chromatographic processes. Three lectures and one four-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-225, 350 or 351, which may be taken concurrently. 3 credits.

L.CHE-448: Advanced Biochemistry
The relationship between the structure and chemical properties of proteins and nucleic acids will be studied. Topics include: structure, chemistry, isolation, modification, and genetic manipulation of DNA, RNA and proteins. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-234, 335. 4 credits.

L.CHE-454: Theories of Organic Chemistry
A lecture course treating stereochemistry of organic compounds and mechanisms of organic reactions. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-234, 352, which may be taken concurrently. 4 credits.

L.CHE-455: Inorganic Chemistry
Treats the nature of bonding in inorganic systems, the relationship between chemical bonding and the chemical and physical properties of inorganic compounds, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and the use of thermodynamics, kinetics and physical methods in studying inorganic systems. Prerequisite: L.CHE-352, which may be taken concurrently. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 4 credits
.
L.CHE-490: Senior Thesis
Chemistry and Biochemistry majors will give a seminar, present a poster and write a thesis on research projects conducted on or off campus. Prerequisite: L.CHE-389. 1 credit per year.

L.CHE-491: Research
Provides an introduction to the methods of chemical research and the systematic use of the chemical literature. Open only to qualified students upon recommendation of the chairperson of the division. Credits to be arranged.

L.CHE-495: Topics
Subjects, prerequisites and credits to be announced.

COMMUNICATION ARTS

L.LIB-110: Public Speaking & Group Communication-FS
Designed to develop effective speaking before audiences through understanding of rhetorical principles and through practice in construction, delivering, and evaluating informative and persuasive speeches; classroom applications in impromptu and extemporaneous modes of speaking. Fulfills the College requirement in oral communication. 3 credits.

L.COM-111: Civility in Service
This course provides participants with an introduction to etiquette, respecting other’s needs, and developing leadership practices in serving others. From tech etiquette to ballroom dance lessons, students will effectively utilize the process of experiential learning with a strong emphasis placed on structured group activities, out-of-class experiences in service, selected readings and class discussions. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-125: Go Dog Go: The Human/Canine Connection
“Man’s (sic) best friend,” “It’s a dog’s life,” “Fighting like cats and dogs.” These are more than sayings and phrases linked to a popular domestic animal. Rather, they are cultural references to the many communicative characteristics of the canine. In addition to their long-time role of family pet, herder and police support staff, increasingly dogs are used for disability assistance, prisoner rehabilitation and nursing home fellowship. This course will immerse students in selected communication theories. Specifically, the course examines communication concepts such as perception, emotions, interpersonal interaction, compliance gaining, verbal messages and nonverbal messages. The course will also expose students to professionals who train and utilize dogs for their many communicative abilities. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-131: Introduction to Mass Communication
A wide-ranging survey of the history, functions, effects, social issues and ethical responsibilities of the media. Includes theory grounded in mass communication. A minimum grade of C is required for students majoring in Media Studies or Public Relations. 3 credits.

L.COM-158: Introduction to Television Production
A study of the basic techniques and methods of effective television broadcasting, programming, production, and studio operations. 3 credits.

L.COM-159: Mock Trials
Intercollegiate participation as an attorney or witness in a simulated court trial or in a mediated settlement conference; stresses analytical and presentational skills. In part, the student will be evaluated by professors, attorneys, and judges. Prior legal knowledge not essential. Consent of instructor required prior to enrollment spring semester. 1 credit.

L.COM-164: Digital Imaging
This course combines the basic techniques of creating and manipulating images in a digital format through digital photography and Photoshop software. 3 credits.

L.COM-190: Communication Theory
An introduction to the theories and applications of communication in our daily lives. Various approaches exploring interpersonal, intercultural, organizational and mediated forms of communication will be studied. 3 credits.

L.COM-193: Theatre Practicum.
Hands on experience through participation in a Loras Players production. Credit may be earned by participation in either the technical areas of the production or by participation as an actor. Contact the Director of the Loras Players. 1-3 credits.

L.COM-201: Principles of Public Relations
A basic course introducing the theories, processes and techniques involved in researching, planning and implementing programs designed to influence public opinion and behavior, particularly as based on communication theory. Prerequisite: L.LIB-110. 3 credits.

L.COM-202: Public Relations Writing
A fundamental skills course in writing, editing and designing materials for use in public relations. For students majoring in public relation, the program requires a minimum 2.7 (B-) in this course. Prerequisite: L.LIB-110. 3 credits.

L.COM-203: Principles of Interviewing
An introduction to the principles of interviewing and being interviewed. Students will learn and practice the techniques of three different types of interviews (informational, persuasive and employment), gaining experience in interview situations on both sides of the table, both in and outside the classroom. Prerequisite: L.LIB-110. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-204: Organizational Communication
A review of the classic and contemporary perspectives of organizational communication, including cultural and critical approaches. This course also explores organizational communication processes such as assimilation, decision-making, and conflict management. Prerequisites: L.LIB-110 and L.COM-190 or concurrent enrollment. 3 credits.

L.COM-205: Media History
An historical survey of the mass media from its origins in the printing press to the modern day, exploring the cultural effects of the media's transition from print to radio to television to Internet. 3 credits.

L.COM-207: Stagecraft
An exploration and experience in the various aspects of recreational and educational theater. Emphasizes basic technical production elements, including scene construction, costumes, lighting, painting, properties, etc. Requires classroom demonstration production exclusive of acting. 3 credits. Prerequisite: L.LIB-110.

L.COM-225: Media Writing
Emphasis on format, style, and writing techniques in radio, print, web and television. Practice in the development and scripting of news stories, commercials, and PSA's. For media studies majors the Division requires a minimum 2.7 (B-) in this course. Prerequisite: L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111; Prerequisite or Corequisite: L.COM-131. 3 credits.

L.COM-250: Western Theatre-AA
An exploration of the history of live theatre as it developed throughout Western culture, with emphasis placed on the major historical periods from ancient Greek to the modern Realism/Antirealism movement. The course incorporates a variety of approaches including student presentations, historical research, and group activities. Requires lab time to view two live theatre performances. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.COM-251: American Theatre-AA
A general introduction to live, American theatre with emphasis placed on audience appreciation and understanding of production practices. Through a variety of approaches such as student presentations, group activities, and theatre performance the course considers and explores methods used by American theatre artists. Requires lab time to view two live theatre performances. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.COM-255: Interpersonal Communication-AI
This course embraces three themes central to the “Identity and Community” category. The themes include (1) person-to-person interaction with friends, family members, romantic partners, and co-workers; (2) how the roles of community, culture, and gender influence person-to-person interactions; and (3) how technology and media influence person-to-person interactions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.COM-257: Electronic Field Production
Creative video production in out-of-studio locations; includes concept development, audience analysis, cinematography, audio sweetening, lighting, digital editing. Includes the creation of commercials, dramatic and documentary production. Prerequisite: L.COM-158. 3 credits.

L.COM-259: Mock Trials
Intercollegiate participation as an attorney or witness in a simulated court trial or in a mediated settlement conference; stresses analytical and presentational skills. In part, the student will be evaluated by professors, attorneys, and judges. Prior legal knowledge not essential. Consent of instructor required prior to enrollment spring semester. 1 credit.

L.COM-262: Photojournalism
Hands-on examination of the process of telling journalistic stories through photography. Includes work in interviewing, topical research and image composition. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term or offered as needed.

L.COM-263: The Wonderful World of Animation
Students will experience the world of animation while examining the impact and development of animation in relation to its emergence as a part of the entertainment and information industries. A major part of the course will consist of an in-depth experience with animation software and other techniques used to create animation. No prerequisites. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-264: Desktop Publishing
Principles and theories of design and layout used in developing a variety of publications. Includes typography, graphics, and copy fitting. Emphasizes computer-assisted publishing based on page layout and graphics programs. Students must demonstrate computer competency. Open only to Public Relations majors and Art & Digital Design majors. Prerequisite: L.LIB-110. 3 credits.

L.COM-280: News Analysis
An examination of the selection, content, and delivery of print and broadcast news on the local and national levels. Students will engage a variety of news sources in order to analyze their methods of presentation and structure and in order to gain a greater understanding of the media’s role in determining what news is. L.COM-158 can be taken prior to L.COM-280 or concurrent with L.COM-158. 3 credits.

L.COM-285: World Cinema-AA
An international survey focusing on films of cultural, historic, and artistic significance. The course utilizes film history and film theory to introduce students to the diversity of motion pictures as an art form and as a transmitter of culture. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220.

L.COM-286: Identity & Community in Rock & Roll-AI
A survey of the historical progression of rock and roll from its pre-rock origins to the present. The course focuses on how rock music has given a voice and identity to various subcultures of the past 50 years, including hippies, punks, rappers, and Rastafarians. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.COM-289: Global Filmmaking
A creative, video production course in which students travel to international and/or domestic locations to produce a film. As a production unit, students will engage in all elements of the production process, including: research, writing, cinematography, editing, and distribution. The location, genre, and film style of each production will vary each year. Indicative work includes documentary, ethnographic, and narrative filmmaking. This course can be repeated. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors subject to professor approval. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-290: Communication Management
An overview of the communication management process with an emphasis on both theory and practical application. The student will study, analyze, and draw conclusions from topics such as: audience research, media programming, ownership, legal and regulatory issues as well as other internal and external influences affecting the communication manager. Prerequisite: L.COM-131. 3 credits.

L.COM-293: Media Studies Practicum Staff
Hands-on experience at the campus TV station or radio station. Experiences may include on-air talent, reporting, producing, news writing, editing, and management. Can be taken up to three times. Media Studies majors are required to complete a COM 293 and COM 493 sequence. Prerequisite: L.COM-158. 1 credit.

L.COM-296: The Haight-Ashbury: Exploring the History and Legacy of the Hippies
This course will consider the philosophies, lifestyles, cultural products and legacy of the 1960s counterculture commonly known as the “hippies.” In particular the course will examine how the hippies rejected the values of their parents’ generation and embodied opposing values. This will entail looking at the origins of the hippies in the Beat Generation of the 1950s and their bohemian lifestyle, the height of the hippie movement in the Summer of Love of 1967, the demise of their utopian idealism, and the longer lasting legacy of the counterculture in a variety of significant cultural movements, including environmentalism, pacifism, feminism, and a generally greater societal openness. The course will explore these topics through lectures, readings, films, music, discussion, and a trip to San Francisco and Monterey to visit the center of the hippie movement, the Haight-Ashbury District, and the location of the Monterey International Pop Festival. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-299: Presidential Inauguration Seminar
Students will explore the history, surrounding rituals and process of the smooth transition of power from the current U.S. President to the newly elected President. Students will examine the key dimensions of the Inauguration Ceremonies and Addresses past and present. The course will culminate with a week in Washington, D.C. attending Inauguration ceremonies and the Inaugural Address. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-300: Theatre Performance Through Workshopping
This course is developed so as to allow students to explore the performance art of “live theatre.” Through work-shopping techniques such as improvisation, storytelling, and speed writing; students will write, rehearse and perform as original performance piece. Previous performance experience is recommended. Instructor permission is required. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-302: Creative Children’s Theatre
Students will explore the world of children’s theatre by creating an original script for performance during the spring semester. Students will formulate a performance concept, analyze submitted pieces from local elementary schools, provide feedback on the submitted pieces through a rubric developed by the class, and create a performance script based on the chosen pieces. Students must be available to participate in the children’s production during the spring semester. Permission of the instructor is required. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-305: Media Convergence
An examination of the methodologies, trends, and practices of social media technology in journalistic mediums. Extensive work in application of those technologies for mobile journalists. Prerequisites: L. COM 225 and L.COM 280. 3 credits.

L.COM-330: Business Speaking & Writing
Intermediate level public speaking theory and practice in business situations, both informative and persuasive. Practical application in writing typical in business situations. Emphasis on teamwork. Prerequisite: L.LIB-110 or equivalent. 3 credits.

L.COM-351: Advanced Public Relations Writing
A continuation of the basic public relations writing course that stresses working with media personnel and writing for Internet and media formats. Requires students to conduct situational analysis and to demonstrate a grasp of appropriate principles. Prerequisite: L.COM-202. 3 credits.

L.COM-352: Advanced Broadcast Writing
Further development of skills introduced in the basic broadcast writing course, emphasizing longer and more complex formats, documentaries, corporate videos, and narrative programs. Elements to be included are knowledge of structure, flow, and appropriate presentation of content. Prerequisite: L.COM-225. 3 credits.

L.COM-357: Advanced Television Production
Further study and practice in television production and theory for the advanced student; emphasis on how to manage and direct productions. Requires individual demonstrations in traditional and experimental styles and forms. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: L.COM-257. 3 credits.

L.COM-375: Roots: Blues & Rock & Roll
Course examines the origins and significance of the Blues and Rock & Roll by focusing on two of the most important musical artists of the 20th century: Robert Johnson and Elvis Presley. Includes travel to Memphis and the Mississippi Delta Region. The course will look at the historical, musical, and cultural contexts in which the music was created. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-380: Persuasion
A survey and application of theories and premises derived from rhetorical theory as well as behavioral and communication studies; emphasis on uses of persuasion in media and public relations efforts. Prerequisites: L.LIB-110, L.COM-190 (may be enrolled concurrently). 3 credits.

L.COM-386: Conflict Resolution-AI
This course will explore the nature of conflict and the methods individuals and communities us to resolve conflict with an emphasis on collaborative problem solving and mediation in a litigious society. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.COM-388: Art & Dissent in Czechoslovakia-AC
This course examines ways in which the arts, including literature, music, film, theater, and the visual arts, were used as forms of dissent and resistance in the 20th century. Representative topics include the life and literature of Franz Kafka, the creation and performance of art in the concentration camp at Terezin, the films of the Czech New Wave of the 1960s, the music of the Plastic People of the Universe, and the dissident writings of Vaclav Havel and others in the aftermath of the Soviet invasion of 1968 and how they contributed to the fall of Communism. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.COM-390: Media Criticism
A study and application of critical analyses of the media. Students will examine standards and theories applicable to the media, including aesthetic, social, regulatory, and production goals and strategies. Students will also study the media's obligations to the public, as well as the economics and politics of media production in light of its operational structure. Students will be required to know and apply abstract concepts to media texts. Prerequisite: L.COM-131. 3 credits.

L.COM-393: Communication Law
An analysis of legal regulation of communication: First Amendment, defamation, privacy, media access, free press- fair trial and commercial speech. The student is expected to read, evaluate, research, write and articulate significance in selected judicial opinions. Substantial background in media, public relations, politics or history recommended. A minimum grade of C is required for students majoring in Media Studies or Public Relations. 3 credits.

L.COM-394: Internship
Credit will be allowed for off-campus cooperative education experiences consistent with the student's background. Weekly reports, evaluation forms and conferences are required for credit to be received. Prerequisite: Substantial background in courses or experiences preparing the student for independent work in the area of the internship. Prior approval of the chairperson is required. Credit varies.

L.COM-454: Public Relations Case Studies
An advanced course requiring analysis and evaluation of historical and current public relations situations, particularly the impact on organizational structure and the decision-making process. Students will participate in creating and presenting a campaign for a “real” client and a competition for selection of the campaign by the client. Prerequisites: senior standing in the Public Relations major. 3 credits.

L.COM-459: Mock Trials
Intercollegiate participation as an attorney or witness in a simulated court trial or in a mediated settlement conference; stresses analytical and presentational skills. In part, the student will be evaluated by professors, attorneys, and judges. Prior legal knowledge not essential. Consent of instructor required prior to enrollment spring semester. 1 credit.

L.COM-485: Communication Research
The course examines the conceptual foundations of contemporary communication research, literature in the field of communication, processes and uses of quantitative and qualitative analysis, research methods in the discipline and the ethical issues of research. Students will produce an extensive research paper. A minimum grade of C is required for students majoring in Media Studies or Public Relations. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Public Relations or Media Studies or the consent of the instructor. 3 credits.

L.COM-490: Public Relations Senior Seminar & Portfolio-PJ
The seminar is designed to prepare Public Relations students to seek and secure post-graduate employment. Students will be required to complete a professional portfolio and refine their skills necessary to gain employment. Skills include: resume writing, cover letter preparation, speaking, interviewing, employment searching techniques, dressing for success, negotiating an offer, and a demonstration of the Loras Dispositions. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1 credit.

L.COM-491: Media Studies Capstone
A seminar-style course requiring the student to prepare a major project or research paper for presentation in the spring semester. The course will explore a variety of advanced media topics. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 3 credits.

L.COM-492: Journalism Practicum
Hands-on experience with The Lorian or MyDuhawk.com converged website. Journalism minors must take the course two consecutive semesters; one semester with The Lorian and one semester with MyDuhawk.com. Instructor approval required. 1 credit. May be repeated.

L.COM-493: Media Studies Practicum Staff
Hands-on experience at the campus TV or radio station. Students are required to perform in a producing or management role at the station. Can be taken up to three times. Media Studies majors are required to take it two times. Prerequisite: L.COM-293. 1 credit.

L.COM-498: Directed Readings
Independent Study course. See Department Chair for more information.

COMPUTING & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

L.CIT-110: Computing & Information Technology Basics
This is an introductory course focused on the use of computing technology to solve problems, as well as, offering hands-on experience with common computer applications. These applications will be used as tools to help students analyze problems and structure solutions, and include word processing, database, spreadsheet, program development, and the Internet. Topics will include personal computer hardware and software, operating systems computer networks, and information assurance. Restriction: Cannot be taken for credit if L.CIT-111 has already been passed. Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics including one year of Algebra II with a grade of C- or better or L.MAT-113 or higher. 3 credits.

L.CIT-111: Accelerated Computing & Information Technology Basics
This is a community based service learning course focused on the use of computing technology to solve problems, as well as, offering hands-on experience with common computer applications. In this "L.CIT-110"-equivalent course, students will learn basic aspects of computing technology, to analyze problems, and to structure solutions using technology tools. During the course, students will also become familiar with basic principles that apply to justice, human dignity, and distinctiveness of the human being as defined in Catholic Social Teaching. Students will provide computer training to members of the under-employed Dubuque community, and reflect on their experiences using the perspective of the principles of Catholic Social Teaching. Topics will include personal computer hardware and software, operating systems, computer networks, and information assurance. Restriction: Cannot be taken for credit if L.CIT-110 has already been passed. Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including one year of Algebra II with a grade of C- or better or L.MAT-113 or higher. 3 credits

L.CIT-115: Programming & Design Basics
This course provides an introduction to the software engineering principles and tools used in the solution of problems, introduces a programming language and introduces students to social and professional concerns which arise with the use of computers. Prerequisite: L.MAT-113, or L.MAT-117 or above. 4 credits.

L.CIT-217: Network Management
This course focuses on LAN management issues associated with evaluating, installing, and administrating computer networks. This course will integrate current technology and internetworking issues within the context of network operating systems and hardware. The course will have a lab component requiring dedicated desktop and server computers, and network hardware. Prerequisite: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111. 3 credits.

L.CIT-218: Database Management
Database Management is a study of the database models, the design, development, and implementation of a database, E-R and UML diagrams, SQL query language, normalization, database selection, distributed databases, ethical use of databases, and database security and control. Prerequisite: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111. 3 credits.

L.CIT-219: Computer Organization & Architecture
This course introduces the fundamentals of computer hardware where the students will learn basic building blocks of a small computer and how the hardware and software interface with one another. This course includes lab component where students learn the basic building blocks of computer hardware. Prerequisite: L.CIT-115. 4 credits.

L.CIT-225: Data Structures & Algorithms
This course provides an introduction to basic data structures and abstract data types. It introduces a variety of algorithms and problem solving strategies as well as elementary algorithm analysis. Prerequisite: L.CIT-115. 4 credits.

L.CIT-310: Artificial Intelligence
This is an upper-level course focused on the development of intelligent agents. This course covers what an intelligent agent is, how intelligent agents view the world, and how intelligent agents solve problems. The types of agents discussed include those that search for solutions, those that analyze data, and those that learn from their surroundings. Prerequisite: L.CIT-225. 3 credits.

L.CIT-311: Human Computer Interaction
This course provides an introduction to the discipline of Human Computer Interaction. It is concerned with the design, evaluation and implementation of effective computing systems for human use. Topics that will be covered are: History; Principles for Design, Understanding users and their tasks; Designing with the user; Basic human factors; and, Designing visual interfaces. Prerequisites: L.CIT-115 and at least one other course from the following: L.CIT-225, L.CIT-326, L.CIT-327, or L.CIT-332. 3 credits.

L.CIT-321: Data Analysis
This course focuses on evaluating and analyzing different types of business related data and developing effective solutions. It will utilize current spreadsheet and database software as tools to facilitate the interpretation of the data. The course will have a lab component requiring student laptop computers equipped with spreadsheet and database software. Prerequisites: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111, and L.ACC-227 or L.ACC-228. 3 credits.

L.CIT-322: Web Publishing I-Basic Authoring
This course is designed to introduce you to the tools, techniques, and skills needed to publish and manage materials posted on a web site. The course consists of three separate sections. The first section introduces basic XHTML coding and the skills needed to publish simple web pages. Prerequisite: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111. Must be taken along with L.CIT-323 and L.CIT-324. 1 credit.

L.CIT-323: Web Publishing II-Advanced Authoring
This course is designed to introduce you to the tools, techniques, and skills needed to publish and manage materials posted on a web site. The course consists of three separate sections. The second section focuses on programming with JavaScript. Prerequisite: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111. Must be taken along with L.CIT-322 and L.CIT-324. 1 credit.

L.CIT-324: Web Publishing III-Site Development & Administration
This course is designed to introduce you to the tools, techniques, and skills needed to publish and manage materials posted on a web site. The course consists of three separate sections. The third section covers topics on web design, web project management, and web maintenance. Prerequisite: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111. Must be taken along with L.CIT-322 and L.CIT-323. 1 credit.

L.CIT-325: Algorithm Design & Analysis
This course introduces various algorithm design strategies, familiarizes students with well-known algorithms from a variety of areas, does average and worst-case time analysis of algorithms, and extends the set of data structures with which the students are able to work. Prerequisites: L.CIT-225 and L.MAT-230. 3 credits.

L.CIT-326: Visual Basic Programming
This course focuses on continued development of computer applications, focusing on programming software in an object-oriented/event driven environment by taking full advantage of the Microsoft Visual Basic programming language. The course integrates hands-on real-world scenarios with in-depth discussions of programming concepts and techniques. The course will have a lab component requiring student laptop computers equipped with the Microsoft Visual Basic programming software. Prerequisite: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111, and L.CIT-115. 3 credits.

L.CIT-327: Structured COBOL Programming
This course introduces the student to the COBOL programming language, still one of the most popular business programming languages. The main focus of the course is to plan and code working computer programs. Topics covered include sequential file processing, common program structures such as decisions and loops, tables, data validation, batch and on-line processing, and direct access file processing. Prerequisite: L.CIT-115. 3 credits.

L.CIT-332: Web Programming
Students learn a programming language designed to be used on the Internet. Then by working on projects that use the language students learn about the different technologies used on the World Wide Web, such as network and inter-network protocols, process-to-process communication, interfacing to databases, human-computer interaction, and intelligent agents. Prerequisite: L.CIT-115. 3 credits.

L.CIT-347: Software Engineering and Practice
This course provides an introduction to the tools and techniques used in the production of large software projects. It emphasizes a study of the techniques used over the life cycle of the software. Prerequisite: L.CIT-225. 3 credits.

L.CIT-350: Computer Graphics
This course provides an introduction to computer graphics. This will include some of the fundamental algorithms as well as experience in graphics programming using OpenGL. Prerequisite: L.CIT-225. 3 credits.

L.CIT-357: Foundations of Programming Languages
This course provides an introduction to programming language design and implementation. It provides experience in a variety of programming paradigms as well as an introduction to programming language theory. Prerequisite: L.CIT-225. 3 credits.

L.CIT-394: Internship
This course provides structured experience in a work environment outside the classroom. Prerequisites: Two courses in CIT. GPA of 3.0 overall. Credit varies.

L.CIT-430: Project Management
This course provides concepts, methods and techniques in project management and applies them in an information technology environment. The student will apply the concepts and techniques learned to “real-world” cases. The student will evaluate cases using the methods provided and will work as part of a team to manage a project. The course will have a lab component requiring student laptop computers equipped with project management software. Prerequisites: L.CIT-110 or L.CIT-111, L.ACC-228. 3 credits.

L.CIT-432: Computer Networks
The emphasis in this course is the design and construction of computer networks and network protocols. Performance evaluation for network hardware and protocols is also a strong emphasis within the course. Topics include common protocols on the Internet and the decisions that were made to implement them. Examples from current network technologies will be used. Prerequisite: L.CIT-225. 3 credits.

L.CIT-440: Operating Systems
The focus of this course is the study of the fundamental algorithms used to manage the hardware resources of a computer. The topics include CPU scheduling, file structures, memory management, deadlock detection and avoidance, and concurrency control. Prerequisites: L.CIT-219 and L.CIT-225. 3 credits.

L.CIT-485: Systems Engineering
This course uses modeling techniques that aid in the analysis of computer information systems. Students will study, create, and analyze various models and utilize them in designing these systems. Students will also analyze how these systems fit into an organization’s overall structure and strategic plan. Prerequisites: L.CIT-115, L.CIT-217, L.CIT-218 and Senior standing. 3 credits.

L.CIT-489: System Implementation
System Implementation is a capstone experience for CIT majors in the MIS track. Ethics cases, a portfolio, a research paper, a class project, and an individualized computer project are required. Students will synthesize computer knowledge obtained in previous courses, as well as more in-depth research in an area of interest. Prerequisite: L.CIT-430. 3 credits.

L.CIT-490: Capstone Project
This course provides the experience of a semester long group project. It requires the students to apply their hardware and software skills in a group setting where cooperation and coordination are necessary for the successful completion of the project. Prerequisites: must have completed at least four courses in CIT numbered 200 or above and have Senior standing. 3 credits.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

L.CRJ-120: Introduction to Criminal Justice
Introduction to Criminal Justice is designed to give students an academic and applied understanding of the criminal justice system. Students will be expected to conduct observations in law enforcement, courts, and corrections outside of class. The Catholic Bishops’ Statement is used extensively as a lens for looking at a variety of social factors, theoretical insights and research findings related to criminal justice. In addition, other current research publications on immigration, sentencing reform, incarceration rates, street drugs, and evidence-based smart approaches to crime will be explored. Students will also learn about the history and philosophy of criminal justice through class discussions, assigned readings, observations, field trips, and guest speakers. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-224: Criminal Law
The history of criminal law, the elements of crime, and the development of both in the United States. Included also are arrest and courtroom procedures. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-252: Criminology
A comprehensive analysis of crime in the United States, emphasizing the causes and consequences of criminal activity. Consideration is also given to theories of crime and societal responses to criminal behavior. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-253: Introduction to Corrections
An introductory examination of the treatment of criminal offenders in the United States. The history of punishment and its relationship to current competing correctional philosophies is discussed. Major topics include probation, prisons and their operation, and parole. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-260: Victimology
A study of the origins of crime victimization and the various theories related to this area of criminal justice and an exploration of the historical trends and responses that to the issue of crime victimization. Emphasis will be placed on the differences between violent and non-violent victimization, issues related to restorative justice, victim-offender mediation and the emergence of the movement to support victims' rights. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-275: Creating & Controlling Crime-AC
Cultural, historical, and socio-political contexts that give rise to patterns of crime as well as crime control processes are examined and compared. A macro-level analysis of cultural and institutional arrangements that contribute to, as well as inhibit, criminal tendencies in the United States and selected countries throughout the world are explored. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-276: Restorative Justice-AC
This course examines the development of restorative justice in the United States and other countries around the world. The impacts of culture, history, and socio-political contexts that have given rise to the implementation of restorative justice practices are identified and discussed. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-280: Ethical Considerations in Criminal Justice-AV
This course is an examination of ethical considerations within the context of decision-making by criminal justice practitioners and policies of the American criminal justice system. As such, the course will examine morality, ethics, and human behavior from the perspective of various ethical philosophies and their application to a system of social control agencies. In addition, specific ethical dilemmas and controversies associated with the administration of justice in law enforcement, the judiciary, and corrections, as major components of the criminal justice system, will be addressed. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-300: Criminal Investigation
The fundamentals of criminal investigation, including crime scene procedure, crime scene search, collection and preservation of evidence, a survey of related forensic science, police reports, interviews and interrogations, and methods of surveillance. Methods of preparing and presenting the case to the court are also studied. Prerequisites: L.CRJ-120, L.CRJ-252, L.CRJ-253. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-312: Crime Prevention
Familiarization with various theoretical approaches to crime prevention and the framework for describing and understanding current crime prevention initiatives. Emphasis will be placed on the examination and evaluation of current institutional and community crime prevention programs. Prerequisites: L.CRJ-120, L.CRJ-252, L.CRJ-253. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-320: Juvenile Delinquency & Justice
A sociological analysis of the nature of delinquent behavior and key components of the juvenile justice system. An examination of family, neighborhood, school, peer group, social class and cultural determinants of delinquency. In addition, societal attempts to control and prevent delinquency will be considered. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-321: Police & Society
An examination of the police image in a changing society, including police citizen partnership in crime prevention. Issues in policing, including use of deadly force, stress, education, and corruption, together with administrative issues, including recruitment, promotion and management are considered. Prerequisites: L.CRJ-120, L.CRJ-252, L.CRJ-253. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-323: Research Methods in Criminal Justice
Course that will develop basic knowledge and skills of social research. Focus is on the research methods criminologists, sociologists, social workers, and other practitioners in the social sciences field employ to study social phenomenon. Critical evaluation of all phases of the social research process. Requires that students memorize, comprehend, and apply social scientific terms to the analysis and evaluation of information. Junior standing. Prerequisites: L.MAT-115 or equivalent statistics course. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-325: White Collar Crime
An examination of both occupational and organizational criminality. Special attention will be directed to the unique nature of white collar criminality in light of our traditional understanding of crime. The course will explore such issues as the evolution of regulatory law, corporate responsibility, and the limits of the law and law enforcement in combating white collar crime. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-398: Empirical Research
Opportunity for student to conduct advanced research under the direction of Criminal Justice Faculty member. Faculty approval required. Prerequisites: L.CRJ-323. 1 to 3 credits.

L.CRJ-400: Women & Crime
This course was designed to give students an experiential understanding of important issues related to women victims, offenders, prisoners, and criminal justice workers. It focuses on how knowledge is constructed within an often male-defined social context and how that impacts women at all levels. Recognizing that research is influenced by the power relations within society, this course explores how men and women are treated differently within this social context. Institutions, structures, and cultural supports responsible for violence against girls and women will be explored in depth through course material, including field trips and guest speakers, to provide a more complete understanding of needed system transformations, as well as successful treatment of all offenders, victims, survivors, witnesses, etc. Prerequisites: L.CRJ-120, L.CRJ-252, L.CRJ-253. 3 credits. January term.

L.CRJ-480: Senior Seminar-PJ
As a senior seminar and portfolio course, this course has three primary foci. First, the course provides students with the opportunity to reflect upon their experiences at Loras College both within and without the Criminal Justice Major and to identify the ways that these experiences have prepared them to move forward in their lives after college. Second, the course provides students the opportunity to examine the causes of crime from the viewpoint of offenders and to integrate that examination into the knowledge gained in prior criminal justice courses. Prerequisites: L.CRJ-120, L.CRJ-224, L.CRJ-252, L.CRJ-253, L.CRJ-320, L.MAT-115, and L.CRJ-323 OR L.PSY-211 OR L.SOC-332. 3 credits.

L.CRJ-490: Criminal Justice Field Instruction
Individually planned and supervised experience in a criminal justice agency which will enable students to integrate criminal justice knowledge with practical experience. Students will earn between 3-9 hours of academic credit for successful completion of their field instruction experience. Application for field instruction must be made to and accepted by the Criminal Justice Field Instruction coordinator. This course is offered only to criminal justice majors who have completed most of the required courses.

ECONOMICS

L.ECO-221: Principles of Microeconomics
Have you ever wondered why airlines charge higher prices when you walk in off the street than if you call in advance? (or why movie theaters charge children half-price tickets when they take up a whole seat- or have happy hours, or senior citizen discounts, or why the government taxes cigarettes and alcohol?) This class gives insight into the market system and how it works. Students will uncover the workings of the free market system to discover how prices are determined and how other economic decisions are made. 3 credits.

L.ECO-222: Principles of Macroeconomics
Why is the U.S. standard of living higher than that of most other countries, and what does the standard of living depend on? What causes the unemployment rate to rise, and why do some countries suffer from inflation? What determines the exchange rate between the dollar and the Euro? These questions and more will be discussed as students learn more about the economy in which they live. This course can be taken prior to L.ECO-221. 3 credits
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L.ECO-236: Quest for Ethical Development-AV
This class focuses on the relationship between developing and developed countries and the impact of economic progress on the global environment. Who benefits from economic growth and development? Why have some countries grown so rich while others have remained so poor? What has been the effect of economic development on women? Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-120, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.ECO-237: Community/Identity in Urban America-AI
Eighty-five percent of all Americans now live in or near 350 cities. A variety of institutional, technological and economic factors contributed to this urban metamorphosis. Students will investigate this urbanization process as well as the myths and realities of our rural and urban culture as they transformed our personal identity and shaped our communities and institutions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-120, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.ECO-254: God, Catholicism & Capitalism-AV
The basic task of any economic system is the production of enough goods and services for its own survival. The burdens of production and the spoils of distribution are often inequitably allocated among members of society. Why is there poverty among great wealth? Why are populations allowed to starve while others do not have enough space for their garbage? This course utilizes Catholic social teaching and various ethics theories to explore economic and social issues that plague societies and to explore the meaning and measurement of fairness or justice Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ECO-321: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
A theoretical analysis of the pricing and output decisions of firms and industries within a free market economy. Required for majors and minors. Prerequisites: L.ECO-221 and 222. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-322: Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Our ability to achieve our economic goals (full employment, price stability and economic growth) depends upon a theoretical understanding of how these goals are measured, what causes the frequent ups and downs of the business cycle, and what policy prescriptions (monetary and fiscal) are available to mitigate these fluctuations. Required for majors and minors. Prerequisites: L.ECO-221 and 222. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-334: International Trade:
An introduction to the theory of international trade, balance of payments behavior, the causes and consequences of public policies to control trade and foreign exchange rates, the process of international payments mechanisms and their effects on national economy. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-335: Comparative Economic Systems
A study of the theoretical and institutional aspects of current economic systems throughout the world. Discussion focuses upon the different forms of capitalism in the Western world and various kinds of socialism, with particular emphasis upon countries that are in transition from socialism to capitalism. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-336: Economic Development
Why do some countries grow faster than others? Why is the standard of living so much higher in the U.S. than in, say, India? How can we be assured that a country’s standard of living will continue to increase so that its children can enjoy a better life? The study of economic development addresses these questions and many more. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-345: Monetary Theory & Policy
The recent financial crisis (2008-09) and subsequent recession has resulted in a greater emphasis upon the theoretical, institutional, and regulatory underpinnings of our (as well as the global) monetary and financial system. This course emphasizes the importance of money, interest rates, government policy, the Federal Reserve and their influence on the economy. Restrictions: not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-346: Public Finance
The federal government spends trillions of dollars each year. What are the areas of expenditure and what would society gain or lose in each by spending more or less in each? Most of this money is raised by taxes. What is the effect of these taxes on the economy? Is there a way to make the tax and expenditure system more efficient and/or more equitable? These and other issues will be discussed, inclusive of taxes and spending at the state and local level. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-349: Government, Business & the Public Sector
A study of the relationship between market power and economic performance and the role of government in the U.S. economy combined with a survey of U.S. antitrust laws, taxation, and public utility regulation. Restrictions: Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-351: Labor Economics
An overview of the factors affecting the labor market and their policy implications, along with a history and analysis of the labor movement and collective bargaining. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-353: History of Economic Thought
A study of the emergence of economics, the only social science to award a Nobel Prize, takes us down a fascinating road of ideas and individuals, but one filled with intellectual detours and analytical dead ends. We meet Adam Smith, the father of modern economics, who was reported to have been so lost in thought that he fell into a hole in the street as he was walking. After reading Thomas Malthus' Essay on Population that Charles Darwin developed his main ideas contributing to The Origin of the Species. Restrictions: Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.ECO-419: Econometrics
Econometrics is a primary tool for both macroeconomics and microeconomics. With help from the instructor, students will design, set up, and analyze econometric models on the cause and effects of economic and social issues that may include crime, inflation, economic growth, the stock market and education. Prerequisites: L.ECO-221, 222, and L.BUS-250 or L.MAT-115. 3 credits.

L.ECO-490: Economics Seminar
The objectives of this course are to set up and seek solutions to economics issues: inflation, unemployment, crime, the interest rate, Federal Reserve Bank policy, international trade, economic growth and many other issues. Through the application of theoretical models such as the IS-LM, AS-AD, and the money market models, and the use of cost/benefit and econometric models, students will put economic theory to the test by completing a thesis that attempts to explain real life phenomena. Required for majors. Restrictions: Open only to students with Senior status. 3 credits.

EDUCATION


L.EDU-200: Foundations of Education
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the teaching profession by looking at the theoretical underpinnings of education and how theory manifests itself in classroom practice. The class is divided into the following main topics: Teaching as a Profession; What We Teach and Why; History of American Education; and Philosophies of Education. Concurrent enrollment in L.EDU-205. 2 credits.

L.EDU-203: Teaching for Social Justice
This course focuses on preparing teacher candidates to work with students from diverse backgrounds. Topics include: race, religion, gender, social class, disabilities, global education, and English language learners. The goal of the course is for teacher candidates to develop multicultural awareness, learn effective classroom strategies to help close the achievement gap, and to become advocates for multicultural education. Students will also have the opportunity to tutor local students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.EDU-205: Foundations of Special Education
This course introduces students to the policies and practices of special education, including major models, theories, philosophies, historical points of view and contemporary issues. Laws, policies, procedural safeguards and ethical principles related to the process of identifying students with various exceptionalities will be covered Classroom teacher responsibilities for providing interventions, instructional modifications and accommodations to meet the needs of diverse learners will be introduced. 2 credits.

L.EDU-221: Learning Environment & Social Interactions
This course is required for all students pursuing an elementary education major. It introduces students to different theoretical perspectives associated with students’ behavior in the classroom. The course examines the roles and responsibilities of teachers in creating and managing a classroom environment that supports the academic, emotional, and behavioral needs of all students. In addition, the course explores current ethical and legal standards which frame the use of evidence-based practices designed to establish positive learning and social outcomes for all students in an inclusive classroom. Not open to first year students. Prerequisite: L.EDU-200. 2 credits.

L.EDU-222: Introduction to Early Childhood Education, Birth to Age Eight
The focus is on historical and philosophical developments in the care and education of children with typical and atypical development, birth through age eight. Legal basis of services for young children and current social issues and legislation are studied. Students are introduced to the range of children served and services provided in a variety of settings, and includes a 15 hour field experience. 3 credits.

L.EDU-223: Collaboration for Effective Learning
This course is required for all students pursuing an elementary education major. It introduces students to concepts related to family systems theory and collaboration with parents, guardians, and other professionals. The course examines the roles and responsibilities of teachers in creating and maintaining partnerships with families of students who have been diagnosed with a disability and professionals involved with the children and their families. In addition, the course explores current ethical and legal standards which frame the use of evidence-based practices designed to establish positive collaborations with other professionals and members of students’ families. L.EDU-200 recommended. 3 credits.

L.EDU-230: Children’s & Young Adult Literature-AA
This course is a survey and analysis of literacy materials for children and young adults. This course will provide a broad understanding of the history and many genres of literature for children and young adults. It will further introduce students to the process of evaluating and choosing quality literature. Students will explore contemporary strategies and techniques for shaping the experiences of children and young adults with both print and non-print literacy materials. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; L.LIB-130 or L.LIB-135. 3 credits. Dependent upon staff and demand.

L.EDU-232: Curriculum & Instruction in PE, Health & Wellness
Collaboration between elementary teachers that are specialists (physical education, art, music, theater, dance) and generalists is essential for establishing a learning environment that reinforces and deepens the growth and development of the whole child. This course introduces students preparing to become general elementary classroom teachers to a) the content standards and curriculum essentials for physical education and health, b) the importance of developing physically literate individuals that are capable of sustaining an active and healthy lifestyle, and c) strategies for learning about movement and learning through movement. This course is taught concurrently with EDU 233 and EDU 234 in order to provide students with the opportunity to plan and apply integrated lessons. 1 credit. Taken concurrently with L.EDU-233 and L.EDU-234.

L.EDU-233: Curriculum & Instruction in Performing Arts
Collaboration between elementary teachers that are specialists (physical education, art, music, theater, dance) and generalists is essential for establishing a learning environment that reinforces and deepens the growth and development of the whole child. This course introduces students preparing to become general elementary classroom teachers to a) the content standards and curriculum essentials in the performing arts (music, theater, dance), b) the important connections between expressions of art and culture, and c) how the creation and/or performance of art can lead to more meaningful learning. This course is taught concurrently with EDU 232 and EDU 234 in order to provide students with the opportunity to plan and apply integrated lessons. 1 credit. Taken concurrently with L.EDU-232 and L.EDU-234.

L.EDU-234: Curriculum & Instruction in Visual Arts
Collaboration between elementary teachers that are specialists (physical education, art, music, theater, dance) and generalists is essential for establishing a learning environment that reinforces and deepens the growth and development of the whole child. This course introduces students preparing to become general elementary classroom teachers to a) the content standards and curriculum essentials in the performing arts (music, theater, dance), b) the important connections between expressions of art and culture, and c) how the creation and/or performance of art can lead to more meaningful learning. This course is taught concurrently with EDU 232 and EDU 234 in order to provide students with the opportunity to plan and apply integrated lessons. 1 credit. Taken concurrently with L.EDU-232 and L.EDU-233.

L.EDU-255: Social Studies Curriculum & Instruction
This course introduces students to the diversity of cultures prevalent in K-12 U.S. schools today and the impact that this diversity has on student learning. The course examines the historic influences of cultures on education policy in the U.S. and how this continues to have an impact on K-12 systems today. In addition, the course explores how different elements of culture (particularly race, religion, gender, social class, disabilities, language, and geographic region) in the K-12 classroom have influenced student learning. Most importantly, this course addresses how schools are effectively addressing the needs of multiple cultures in their classrooms and developing successful strategies to counter bullying, harassment and discrimination of all kinds. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education required. 2 credits.

L.EDU-256: Science Curriculum & Instruction
Science teaching is a complex activity and requires that teachers have both theoretical and practical knowledge. Effective science teachers have (1) a clear understanding of the nature of science, (2) adequate science content knowledge, (3) knowledge of how students learn, and (4) competence in implementing strategies that exemplify best practice in science teaching. Students will complete this course with a strong foundation in these four areas in order to continue to grow and develop throughout their elementary science teaching career. Corequisite: L.EDU-255. Restriction: admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits.

L.EDU-260: Foundations of Reading
This course is an introduction to the psychological, socio-cultural, and linguistic foundations of reading and writing processes and instruction. A primary focus of the course includes the range of research pertaining to reading, writing, and learning, as well as the history of reading instruction. Out of class time required for tutoring lab. Prerequisite: Not open to first year students. Prerequisite: L.EDU-200. 3 credits.

L.EDU-261: Early Childhood Language & Literacy
Study of oral and written language acquisition and development, birth through kindergarten. Includes theory and practical applications to build knowledge, skills, and dispositions as well as principles of parental and teacher guidance. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.EDU-265: Multicultural Education–AC
This course introduces students to the diversity of cultures prevalent in K-12 U.S. schools today and the impact that this diversity has on student learning. The course examines the historic influences of cultures on education policy in the U.S. and how this continues to have an impact on K-12 systems today. In addition, the course explores how different elements of culture (particularly race, religion, gender, social class, disabilities, language, and geographic region) in the K-12 classroom have influenced student learning. Most importantly, this course addresses how schools are effectively addressing the needs of multiple cultures in their classrooms and developing successful strategies to counter bullying, harassment and discrimination of all kinds. Prerequisites: LIB 100; LIB 105; LIB 110 and completion of either LIB 130, LIB 135 or LIB 220. 3 credits.

L.EDU-321: Curriculum Methods & Materials, Infants & Toddlers
Planning and implementing an integrated program appropriate to infant and toddler development of language, thinking and reasoning are primary aims of this course, with an exploration of techniques and approaches for creating safe and healthy infant and toddler learning environments. Requires a 10-hour field experience. Prerequisites: L.EDU-222; admission to Teacher Education; concurrent registration in L.EDU-323. 3 credits.

L.EDU-323: Curriculum, Methods & Materials/Preprimary
Planning and implementing an integrated program appropriate to preprimary level development of language, thinking and reasoning, and creative expression. Requires a 10-hour field experience. Prerequisites: L.EDU-222 and admission to Teacher Education; concurrent registration in L.EDU-321. 3 credits.

L.EDU-327: Developmental Curriculum & Methods for Children with Special Needs, Birth to Age Five
This course focuses on philosophy, goals, and service delivery approaches for children birth through five, with and without special needs, and their families. Strategies to embed social and functional goals of children with mild to severe special needs into natural routines and development and implementation of an IEP through activity-based instruction and social skills development are covered. Includes a 10-hour field experience. Prerequisites: L.EDU-222. 3 credits.

L.EDU-331: Curriculum & Instruction in Language Arts
This course focuses on writing, speaking, listening, and visually representing within a balanced language and literacy program that emphasizes principles of effective pedagogy for all students. Goals, content, standards, materials, processes, and strategies with a focus on building an effective writing process over time and word study. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Concurrent enrollment in L.EDU- 332. 3 credits.

L.EDU-332: Beginning Reading
This course is an introduction to evidence-based methods of beginning reading instruction and assessment. Reading development, process, goals, content, standards, materials, and strategies with a focus on guided reading are included as primary components in this course. Reading Recovery will be examined. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Concurrent enrollment in L.EDU- 331. 3 credits.

L.EDU-333: Curriculum & Instruction in Mathematics
This course is a treatment of the goals, content, materials and teaching strategies for planning and implementing a mathematics program in the elementary classroom. Prerequisites: L.MAT-111 and admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits.

L.EDU-334: Intermediate Clinical
Development of technical teaching and management skills through clinical teaching experiences; observations, reflections, analysis and evaluation of teaching performance by student, peers, classroom teacher, and course instructor within a 50-hour field experience in a local elementary classroom. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; L.EDU-255, 256, 330, 331, 332, 333. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.EDU-337: Reading Across the Curriculum
This course focuses on effective reading instruction and assessment with an emphasis on the upper elementary grades. Goals, content, standards, materials, strategies for processing a variety of texts, developing comprehension, fluency, and expanding vocabulary within a balanced literacy program. Out of class time required for tutoring lab. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education; L.EDU-331 and 332. 3 credits.

L.EDU-339: Differentiated Instruction, Grades 5-12
This course will deepen student's capacity to identify individual learning differences among children (grades 5-12) and to develop specific strategies for meeting their different learning needs. Students will gain experience in developing individualized learning goals and determining the content, materials, teaching and management strategies for learners with special needs, including the gifted and talented. Recommended that course be taken concurrently with EDU 350. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education Program. 2 credits.

L.EDU-340: Differentiated Instruction, Grades K-6
This course will deepen student’s capacity to identify individual learning differences among children (grades K-6) and to develop specific strategies for meeting their different learning needs. Students will gain experience in developing individualized learning goals and determining the content, materials, teaching and management strategies for learners with special needs, including the gifted and talented. 2 credits.

L.EDU-343: Assessment & Evaluation of Exceptionality, Grades PreK-12
The purpose and content of a variety of formal and informal assessments and their use in making data-based educational decisions are explored. Topics covered include informal assessment and analysis, standardized, norm-referenced and criterion-referenced instruments, systematic observation, curriculum-based measurement, response to intervention (RTI), IEP development, and progress monitoring. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits.

L.EDU-345: Career Development & Transition
Study of career and vocational education for learners with special needs; identification of interests and aptitudes, organization of training and work options as well as transition planning; includes job analysis, job seeking skills, work adjustment, learner evaluation and follow-up, and legal implications. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education. 1 credit.

L.EDU-346: Learning & Behavior Strategies I
Introduction to learning and behavior characteristics of students with exceptional learning needs, identification and classification systems, inclusionary practices, strategies and teaching techniques, evidence-based practices and the development of the Individual Education Plan. This course covers specific learning and behavior strategies related to lesson design and the development of the IEP for students who have identified learning, emotional or behavioral needs, early learners to high school age. 3 credits.

L.EDU-348: Learning & Behavior Strategies II
Extended work on learning and behavior characteristics of students with exceptional learning needs, evidenced-based practices, curriculum methods, strategies and teaching techniques; development of the Individual Education Plan, early learners to high school age. 3 credits.

L.EDU-350: General Secondary Curriculum & Instruction
This course focuses on preparing teaching candidates to teach in middle and high school settings. Topics include: lesson planning, instructional strategies, classroom management, the middle school concept, 21st century skills, and the Iowa Core Curriculum. The course includes a 30 hour field experience in a PDS (Professional Development School) at Wahlert High School. Please note the field experience also includes completion of teacher related tasks coordinated by the instructor and partner teacher at WHS. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits.

L.EDU-350L: Intermediate Clinical, Grades 5-12
This is a supervised 50 hour clinical field experience in the PDS (Professional Development School) program located on-site at a single high school setting. During the semester, teacher candidates will close the gap between theory and practice by teaching lessons and implementing what they have learned from EDU 350. In addition, they will complete teacher related tasks coordinated by the instructor and their partner teacher at the school. Course taken concurrently with L.EDU-350. 1 credit.

L.EDU-352: Special Secondary Curriculum & Methods: English
This is a survey of the goals, content, materials, and strategies for teaching English at the middle and high school levels, including an analysis of specific subject matter curriculum. Includes a 30-hour field experience in a middle or high school. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended: L.EDU-350. 3 credits.

L.EDU-353: Special Secondary Curriculum & Methods: Mathematics
This is a survey of the goals, content, materials, and strategies for teaching Mathematics at the middle and high school levels, including an analysis of specific subject matter curriculum. Includes a 30-hour field experience in a middle or high school. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended: L.EDU-350. 3 credits.

L.EDU-354: Special Secondary Curriculum & Methods: Science
This is a survey of the goals, content, materials, and strategies for teaching Science at the middle and high school levels, including an analysis of specific subject matter curriculum. Includes a 30-hour field experience in a middle or high school. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended: L.EDU-350. 3 credits.

L.EDU-355: Special Secondary Curriculum & Methods: Social Studies
This is a survey of the goals, content, materials, and strategies for teaching Social Studies at the middle and high school levels, including an analysis of specific subject matter curriculum. In particular, there will be an emphasis on the powerful social studies teaching strategies emphasized by NCSS (National Council for the Social Studies). Includes a 30-hour field experience in a middle or high school. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits.

L.EDU-356: Special Methods Spanish, Grades K-8 & 5-12
Goals, content, materials, and strategies for teaching a second language (Spanish) at the elementary and secondary level. Analysis of specific curriculum and methodologies, exploration of the intersection between language and culture, and 30-hour field experience included in course expectations. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education. Recommended: L.EDU-350 (for secondary majors) or L.EDU-334 (for elementary majors) completed. 3 credits.

L.EDU-357: Reading in the Middle & Secondary School
Secondary students are presented an overview of reading and reading techniques, assessment, materials, teaching strategies and study strategies for middle and high school subject-matter areas. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits.

L.EDU-360: Evaluation & Diagnosis of Reading Problems
This course provides for an examination of instruments useful to the classroom teacher for assessment purposes with an emphasis on the informal reading inventory. Attention to evaluating and interpreting data received during assessment experiences and used as a basis for diagnosis of student strengths and needs. Prerequisite: L.EDU-332. Restriction: Admission to Teacher Education. 3 credits.

L.EDU-361: Practicum & Instruction in Remediation of Reading Problems
This experience facilitates the acquisition of strategies for improving reading performance of developmental and corrective readers in the elementary classroom. Supervised practicum provides opportunities to tutor elementary children using specific strategies for correcting word and comprehension deficiencies. Special needs of students with cultural or language differences are addressed. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education, L.EDU-332 and 360. 3 credits.

L.EDU-411: Student Teaching in Elementary Music
Directed participation in an elementary school; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-412: Student Teaching in Secondary Music
Directed participation in a secondary school; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-416: Student Teaching in Elementary Physical Education
Directed participation in an elementary school; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-417: Student Teaching in Secondary Physical Education
Directed participation in a secondary school; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-418: Student Teaching in Secondary Health & Physical Education
Directed participation in a secondary school involving; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-424: Student Teaching in Early Childhood Special Ed (ages 0-5)
Directed participation in infant and toddler or pre-k inclusive settings; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-425: Student Teaching in Early Childhood (ages 0-5)
Directed participation in infant and toddler or pre-k inclusive settings; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-426: Student Teaching in Primary, Grades K-3 (ECE)
Directed participation in kindergarten, first, second or third grade inclusive settings; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for eight weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-432: Student Teaching in the Elementary School
Directed participation in the schools; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for 16 weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 10 credits.

L.EDU-441: Student Teaching: Instructional Strategist I, K-8
Directed participation in the schools; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for 8 weeks. Co-requisite L.EDU-442. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-442: Student Teaching: Elementary Education with Instructional Strategist I
Directed participation in the schools; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for 8 weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Co-requisite:
L.EDU-441. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-443: Student Teaching: Instructional Strategist I, 5-12
Directed participation in the schools; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for 8 weeks. Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching. Co-requisite: L.EDU-444. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-444: Student Teaching: Secondary Education with Instructional Strategist I
Directed participation in the schools; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for 8 weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Co-requisite: L.EDU-443. Graded pass/fail only. 5 credits.

L.EDU-452: Student Teaching in the Secondary School
Directed participation in a secondary school; observation and teaching under guidance of college supervisor and cooperating teacher; individual and group conferences; full-day experience for 16 weeks. Restriction: Admission to student teaching. Graded pass/fail only. 10 credits.

L.EDU-490: Capstone Seminar & Portfolio-PJ
This course provides student teachers with an opportunity to reflect on their own learning experience at the same time that they are facilitating the learning of others through their student teaching experience. This course prompts students to reflect on how they have grown as a learner in relation to the Loras College dispositions and how their Loras experience has shaped the teacher that they are becoming. The course also serves to encourage student teachers to deepen and share their problem solving skills as they collectively share their student teaching challenges and victories. Fundamentally, the course requires that students create an electronic portfolio that synthesizes their skills and dispositions as an emerging teacher within the context and value of their liberal arts preparation at Loras College. Concurrent enrollment in student teaching required. 2 credits.

ENGINEERING


L.EGR-105: Intro to Engineering I
Introduction to the engineering profession and its disciplines. Introduction to engineering design. Visualization of objects. Manual sketching of pictorials (isometric, oblique). Solid modeling using SolidWorks CAD software. Multi-view projection theory and standard engineering drawing practices (reading, dimensioning, auxiliary views and section views). One hour of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Required for all engineering students. 3 credits.

L.EGR-106: Intro to Engineering II
Engineering design process applied to a team project involving the creation of a product that meets specific design specifications. The design project and other engineering problems will involve conceptualization, analysis, and implementation. Oral and written reports that are typical of engineering design process are required. One hour of lecture and two hours of lab per week. Required for all engineering students. Prerequisite: L.EGR-105. 3 credits.

L.EGR-231: Engineering Statics
An introduction to engineering statics. Topics include vectors, resultants, equilibrium, structural analysis, centroids, friction, and moment of inertia. Three hours of lecture/ discussion per week. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 or above. 3 credits.

L.EGR-232: Engineering Dynamics
An introduction to engineering dynamics. Topics include kinematics and kinetics (displacement, velocity, acceleration, work, energy, impulse, and momentum) for particles and rigid bodies. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; L.EGR-231. 3 credits.

L.EGR-236: Properties & Mechanics of Materials
Introduction to materials and solid mechanics of typical engineering materials emphasizing how the microscopic scale properties impact the macroscopic properties such as stress-strain curves, hardness, fatigue curves, creep curves. Topics in solid mechanics include strains, stresses, Mohr’s Circle, shear and bending moment diagrams, simple structural members. This class also includes a semester-long design project Includes a two-hour lab period each week. Prerequisites: L.MAT-160 or higher; L.EGR-106, L.EGR-231. 4 credits.

L.EGR-240: Mechatronics & Smart Product Design
A hands-on course in mechatronics which includes designing, constructing, and testing a smart system or product controlled using a microcontroller. Additional topics include: digital logic, transistors, relays, motor control, use of common sensors and actuators. Activities include a design project where students design, build, program, and test a product which is controlled by the microcontroller and an off campus daytrip or company tour. Prerequisite: An introductory programming course or equivalent background. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.EGR-242: Manufacturing Processes & Design
Method of commercial manufacturing. Includes topics of casting, forging, forming, joining, cutting, drilling, milling, and lathe work. Also includes: designing parts to make them easy to manufacture, workshop laboratories where students learn basic use and safety of metal and wood working equipment; completion of a project where students design and construct project of their choosing; and tours of local manufacturing facilities. There are no prerequisites although a CAD background may be helpful. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.EGR-333: Fluid Mechanics
The laws of fluid statics and dynamics. Topics include: properties of substances, fluid statics, the energy equation, the momentum equation, and viscous effects in external and internal flows. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-111 or 114; L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260; L.PHY-224. 3 credits.

L.EGR-334: Thermodynamics
The laws of thermodynamics. Topics include: properties of substances and phase equilibrium, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, entropy, power cycles and refrigeration cycles. Three hours of lecture/discussion per week. Prerequisites: L.CHE-111 or L.CHE-114; L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260; L.PHY-224. 3 credits.

L.EGR-335: Electric Circuits
Introduction to DC and AC circuit analysis using Laplace Transforms, Kirchhoff's laws, network simplification, nodal and loop techniques. Consideration of amplifiers, power supplies and discrete circuit elements including resistors, capacitors, inductors, diodes, transistors, and operational amplifiers. Three class periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: L.PHY-224; L.MAT-310. 4 credits.

L.EGR-342: Modeling & Control of Dynamic Systems
Modeling and analysis of dynamic systems and controls in the electrical and mechanical realms. Categories of models include linear vs. nonlinear, 1st vs. 2nd order, continuous vs. discrete. Transient, steady-state, and frequency responses. Open-loop and closed-loop control systems. Modeling will include computer simulations. Includes a two hour lab each week. Prerequisites: L.EGR-232; L.MAT-260, L.MAT-310; L.CIT-115; L.PHY- 224. 4 credits.

L.EGR-488: Engineering Topics & Review
An introduction to engineering topics such as engineering economics and engineering ethics not covered elsewhere in the engineering curriculum. Review of engineering topics in preparation for Fundamentals of Engineering exam taken in L.EGR-489. Prerequisites: L.EGR-232, L.EGR-236 and at least 2 engineering courses numbered 300 or above; L.MAT-260, L.MAT-310; L.CIT-115; L.PHY-224. 1 credit.

L.EGR-489: Engineering Review & Assessment
Review of major topics in engineering in preparation for the General FE (Fundamentals of Engineering) licensing examination. Exam topics are: mathematics, computer programming, statics, dynamics, chemistry, materials science, mechanics of materials, engineering economics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, analog circuits, digital circuits, and engineering ethics. One hour of discussion and problem solving per week. Prerequisite: L.EGR-488. 1 credit.

L.EGR-490: Senior Capstone Engineering Design I
First part of a year-long, multidisciplinary-team-based, open-ended engineering design project. Projects involve electromechanical systems under the control of a microcontroller. Skills practiced include teaming, project and time management, conflict resolution, literature search, experimental design, oral and written reports. Prerequisites: L.EGR-232, L.EGR236, and at least 2 engineering courses numbered 300 or above; L.MAT-310; L.CIT-219, L.CIT-225; L.PHY- 224. 4 credits.

L.EGR-491: Senior Capstone Engineering Design II
Second part of a year-long, team-based, open-ended engineering design project. Teams only involve engineering majors in the spring. Assessment, analysis, improvements of the product. Culmination in a poster presentation and a formal written design report that becomes the senior thesis. Four hours of lab per week. Prerequisite: L.EGR-490. 4 credits.

ENGLISH


L.ENG-111: Critical Writing-FW
A literature-based writing course stressing analysis, argumentation, research and written expression. Fulfills college writing requirement for students of advanced standing in English. Prerequisite: advanced standing in English. 3 credits.

L.ENG-150: Composing with Video
A multi-modal composition course focusing on script writing and turning finished scripts into brief (4-8 minute) movies. It is a hands-on course that requires creativity. Students will create and edit movies using contemporary digital software. No prior knowledge of script writing and/or movie making is needed in order to enroll in the course. L.ENG-150 is not applicable to the Creative Writing major, Literature major, or English minor. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-210: Literary Studies
In this course students will be stimulated to think about the purpose and value of studying literature, and introduced to the interpretive reading skills and critical vocabulary of basic textual analysis (i.e. close reading, and structural and formalist analysis). Students will learn to write about the elements of literature, including, for example, plot, character, setting, ideas, point of view, imagery, metaphor, symbolism, allegory, and prosody. The course also introduces students to contextual analysis. It emphasizes practical instruction in writing critical essays, and is writing-intensive. Newly declared English literature and creative writing majors should take this course the first semester it is offered after they declare, if they have not taken it already. 3 credits.

L.ENG-221: World Literature: Beginnings to Middle Ages
Selected works from classical Greece, India and China, and from medieval Arabia, Europe and Japan. 3 credits. Spring semesters of odd numbered years.

L.ENG-222: World Literature: Renaissance to Modern
Selected works from European, Native and Latin American, African, South Asian and Asian cultures. 3 credits. Spring semesters of even numbered years.

L.ENG-225: Literature of Oppression and Resistance-AC
This course examines literary works from various social and historical contexts that address issues of oppression and resistance, focusing especially on literature that reflects the experience of colonialism.  Representative works include Shakespeare’s Tempest, Aime Cesaire’s A Tempest, Joyce’s Dubliners, Albert Camus’s A Plague, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-231: Short Fiction-AA
A course in the genre of short fiction: possibilities, varieties, structures and types. Authors vary. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-232: The Novel-AA
A course in the genre of the novel: possibilities, varieties, structures, and types. Authors vary. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-233: Drama-AA
The course will provide students with an introduction to the reading and study of drama, including structure, dramatic strategies, symbolism, thematic analysis, and stage craft. Plays selected are at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-235: The Revisionist Superhero-AA
In this course students will first learn the boundaries and cultural expectations of elements of the traditional superhero narrative; then, the course will engage some of the major texts that challenge those expectations, as well as the deep and rich body of associated criticism that places those texts in an aesthetic and cultural context. The texts used in this course have been selected specifically because they are widely-viewed as stories that transcend their genre, and thus are recognized as a fine art form in and of themselves. Students will examine the evolution of the super-hero genre that began with the inception of “superhero revisionism” in the early 1980s, particularly in terms of the way these former four-color characters have been transformed in terms of character, visual styling, and most importantly, the stories told about them. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-237: Fiction Writing
This course is an introductory-level creative writing class focused on the short story. The class is conducted as a workshop/seminar of approximately 15 students, with heavy emphasis on student-composed fiction. To complete the course, students must write three short stories for a cumulative total of at least 25 final pages, participate actively in class, and critique other students' work in writing. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111. 3 credits.

L.ENG-238: Poetry Writing
An introductory workshop course in the art and craft of writing poetry. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105, or L.ENG-111. 3 credits.

L.ENG-239: Creative Nonfiction Writing-AA
Introductory level workshop in which students write and receive feedback on creative nonfiction essay forms. Students also analyze the writing techniques of published authors. Editing workshops focus on stylistic polish. When offered in January Term, the course is thematically focused on “Writing the Midwestern Landscape,” with three required winter hikes and inclusion of digital photography. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. Each spring semester or January term.

L.ENG-240: The Nature of Nature in Ireland-AC
This course involves a multi-dimensional look at nature in Ireland through the study of historical influences and literary interpretations. Topics include the formation of Ireland's landscapes, the megalithic, Celtic, and early Christian (especially monastic) interactions with nature, and the impact of colonial occupation and modern commercialism. Course to be offered in the Ireland Study Abroad program. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-241: Literature for Ethical Reflections-AA
This course provides concrete situations in literature for studying ethical issues in works such as Brave New World, Crime and Punishment, A Doll's House, Lord Jim. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-242: Chicago Literature-AA
Students will read, analyze, discuss, and study novels, stories, plays, and poems set in whole or in large part in Chicago. Readings include novels, stories, plays, poems, and primary non-fiction documents. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-248: Caribbean, African, Asian Literature of Identity-AI
Literature in English from the current and former British Empire excluding the British Isles; emphasis on the Third World. Demonstrates how literature shapes and reflects the identities of emerging Caribbean, African, and Asian nations. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-251: Literature of the Frontier & American West-AA
Students will focus on and discuss the aesthetic and cultural significance of the literature of discovery, conflict, adventure, and travel in the land west of the Mississippi River. They will examine the relationships between non-fiction (i.e., personal narratives, newspaper writing, diaries, letters, and travel logs) and fiction (short stories, myths and legends, oral narratives, and novels). Students will also explore the ways in which genre, environment, language and bilingualism, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, and personal politics all shape, reflect, and restrict artistic expression during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. Representative authors: Bret Hart, Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Ambrose Bierce, Mary Hunter Austin, Stephen Crane, Zane Grey, Frank Norris, Hamlin Garland, Zitkala-Sa, Kate Chopin, and Laura Ingalls Wilder. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-252: The Law in American Film & Fiction-AA
Students will study “the law” in American literature and film, focusing on the issues and consequences of creating, breaking, enforcing, and challenging “the law” and/or “legal” system(s). They will consider the relationships between legal literature/film and such issues as humanity, justice, love, ethics, citizenship, community, criminality, victimhood, environment, revenge, and social responsibility. They will also participate in a mock trial. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-253: Native Voices, Native Lives
This experiential learning course engages students in reading, writing and reflecting upon a variety of Native American voices and experiences (Cherokee, Navajo, Lakota, Dakota, Ojibwe, Pah-Ute, Spokane, Ho-Chunk, etc.). Students will immerse themselves in the novels, short stories, myths, poetry, and oral histories of Native American people, in order to expand and deepen their understanding of cultural voice. Students will spend the second week learning directly from native people as the class travels to experience tribal history and culture first hand. Students’ final projects will integrate the texts and experiences of the course into a researched and reflective product. Daily discussions, journaling, and mini-service projects in the community will be part of the overall on-site learning experience. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; either L.LIB-105 or L.LIB-110. Instructor’s permission required. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-254: Travel Writing: Guatemala & Int'l Service
This course is both a study travel course and a community-based learning course. This Travel Writing service course to Guatemala is an introductory level workshop in which students write and receive feedback on creative nonfiction essay forms based on primary and secondary research. The thematic focus for the course is on citizenship and international service. Students will analyze the writing techniques of published authors; research secondary sources related to ideas about service, citizenship, and Guatemala’s political and social experiences with foreign aid; and create a travel narrative that defines service and reflects on their service experiences. Editing workshops will teach stylistic elements and focus on the process of writing. Students will spend 10 days in Guatemala, 5 of which will be spent in a Mayan village in the mountains near Semachaca where we will be finishing a building project—the construction of a medical clinic. The other 5 days will be spent visiting cultural sites to gain more cultural context and to conduct research for your travel narrative. Our on-campus work—5 days before and after our visit to Guatemala—will include talks given by former Peace Corps volunteers and other service agencies; cultural and historical research on Guatemala; discussions of travel narratives written by volunteers who worked in Guatemala; and writing and editing workshops that will walk you through the creative writing process. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-255: All for One, One for All-AI
An investigation into questions surrounding the responsibilities of the individual to the community as evident in the work of three Nobel prize-winning authors- Francois Mauriac, Albert Camus and Samuel Beckett. We will examine the notions of choice, free will, personal identity and faith and discuss ways in which these notions function within the framework of the novels/plays chosen for the semester. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135 or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-264: American Literature: The Search for Identity-AA
A thematic course in American literature, focusing on the search for identity as evidenced in literature. Recent themes have included Male/Female identities, War & Peace, Healing & Searching, and Ego & Shadow. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-266: Science Fiction Cyborg Communities-AI
This course considers the role of science fiction in shaping our cultural responses to identity and community. Our readings will specifically address the ethical dilemmas of the cyborg and will include texts by Donna Haraway, Baudrillard, Isaac Asimov, Octavia Butler, Maureen McHugh, Greg Bear, Arthur C. Clarke, Kim Stanley Robinson, Robert Heinlein, Japanese anime films, Star Trek, and Bladerunner. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-270: Bleak House in Context
This course is an in-depth study course on a major British novel and author-Charles Dickens' Bleak House. Students will read the novel in context: in the installment form (fortunately available in the Special Collections of Loras' ARC), alongside other Victorian publications and cultural artifacts, and through "contact" with the Victorians via role play. The course will simulate the Victorian methodology of reading narratives in serial format. Students will generate a class e-periodical which involves assuming the "roles" or voices of particular Victorian figures as found through their wider reading in the Special Collections resources of All the Year Round and Household Words (both journals edited by Dickens), the Newgate Journal and other Victorian texts. They will also have the opportunity to present their research, role play, and reading experiences in the display cases outside of the Special Collection room in the ARC. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-273: The Gothic Imagination-AC
This course begins with a study of the cultural and historical events of the late eighteenth century that led into the development of the Gothic imagination, especially the rise of Romanticism and revolution. Specific primary works, including fiction, art, and film, will vary from semester to semester, but will be ordered chronologically to allow students to trace the evolution of the Gothic form. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-274: Irish Gothic-AC
This course will first explore the reasons for which the Gothic tradition, with its literary roots in Walpole and Radcliffe and its political roots in the French Revolution, found fertile ground in the Anglo-Irish culture of the nineteenth century. Then it will investigate the evolution of that tradition in the works of selected writers: Maria Edgeworth, Charles Maturin, Sheridan Le Fanu, and Bram Stoker. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-275: Witchcraft in Early Modern British Literature
This three-credit course is a single topic course designed as an initial immersion in the subject of the literary and cultural depiction of witchcraft and those accused of it in early modern Britain. Students will read and discuss primary texts (ranging from Shakespeare plays to early modern tracts on witchcraft) and secondary texts (historical research). The course’s experiential component is in the form of a witch trial reacting game. Prerequisite: L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-285: Modern Irish Literature & Culture
The course undertakes a literary oriented investigation and interrogation of modern Irish culture. Through the reading and discussion of selected 19th and 20th century Irish literary works, students in the course will explore various essential aspects of Irish communal life in order to apprehend the continuity and transformation of Irish culture over the last two centuries. Topics covered will include family structure, religious practice, economic conditions, education, attitudes toward land and language, relationships between the colonized and the colonizers, between classes, between sectarian groups. Representative authors include William Carleton, Lady Gregory, William Butler Years, J. M. Synge, James Joyce, Sean O’Casey, Brian Friel, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland. 3 credits.

L.ENG-286: Ireland in Film
This course surveys a wide-range of Irish-themed films in order to develop a deeper understanding of modern Irish cultural identity. Major thematic areas explored in the course include representations of the Irish West, the political struggle for independence, the role of Catholicism in Irish society, the status of minority groups such as the Irish travelers and the urban working class in Ireland. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-290: Canadian Imagination-AC
A study of how geography and history have influenced the development of Canadian culture. We will study literature, drama and film from Canada’s diverse cultures, both in English and in translation from French and aboriginal languages. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.ENG-301: Poetry in Performance
This is an in-depth study of lyric poetry for students who want to approach the subject in an experiential way. Students will develop their understanding and appreciation for poetry by doing close readings of poems, writing critical essays based on these close readings, and making poetry physically part of themselves through memorization and performance. They will learn to read aloud and recite poems in a way that develops their expressiveness and other public speaking skills. Topics will include the application of fundamental topics in poetics, including imagery, trope, lineation, syntax, tone, sound, prosody, and the concepts of speaker and addressee. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105 or L.LIB-110. Recommended: at least one college-level literature course. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits.  January term.

L.ENG-324: African American Literature
This course surveys nineteenth- and twentieth- century African American literature. Poetry, speeches, fiction, folk tales, song, essays and autobiography will be examined, and an experiential, community-based component will be incorporated. 3 credits.

L.ENG-325: American Literature: 1820-1860
This course surveys the literature and culture of the American Renaissance, focusing on the Romantic and Transcendental writers and texts, as well as on the literature of Abolition and of women’s rights. Short stories, novels, creative non-fiction, essays, and political documents will be examined. Representative authors: Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, Sedgwick, Melville, Thoreau, Stowe, Dickinson, Fuller, Whitman. 3 credits.

L.ENG-326: American Literature: 1861-1900
This course surveys the literature and culture of the Civil War and Reconstruction era, focusing on the slave narrative, Realism, Naturalism, Children’s fiction, and the American Gothic. Psychology, gender, race, class, religion, and other themes are considered as they influenced writers and literature from the time period. Representative authors: Howells, Alcott, Twain, James, Crane, Chopin, Gillman. 3 credits.

L.ENG-328: American Literature: Modern & Contemporary Poetry
Representative poets: Eliot, Stevens, Pound, H.D., Frost, Williams, Simic, Dove, C. K. Williams, Plath, Rich. This course implements elements of Catholic social teaching through service learning in which students work with local artists using poetry as a form of activism. 3 credits.

L.ENG-329: American Literature: Modern & Contemporary Drama
Representative dramatists: O’Neill, Glaspell, Hellman, Williams, Shange, Miller, Albee, Rabe, Wilson, Howe, Wasserstein. 3 credits.

L.ENG-330: American Literature: Modern Prose, 1900-1945
Representative authors: Wharton, Dreiser, Cather, Stein, Anderson, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Wright, Porter. 3 credits.

L.ENG-331: American Literature: Contemporary Prose, 1945-Present
Representative authors: Ellison, Baldwin, Malamud, Bellow, Welty, Carver, Cheever, Oates, Tyler, Mason, Walker, Morrison, Kincaid. 3 credits.

L.ENG-332: Major American Authors
A study of significant authors, their texts and recent critical biographies. Authors vary. Students may take this course twice, for different authors. 3 credits.

L.ENG-333: Shakespeare Before 1600
This is a chronologically-organized, cross-genre exploration of Shakespeare's earlier drama. This course will cover his comedies, histories, and tragedies up to about 1600. The plays will be a selection (subject to change) from the following: The Comedy of Errors, Richard III, Titus Andronicus, The Taming of the Shrew, Romeo and Juliet, Richard II, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry IV parts I and II, Much Ado about Nothing, Julius Caesar, and As You Like It. 3 credits.

L.ENG-334: Shakespeare After 1600
This is a chronologically-organized, cross-genre exploration of Shakespeare's later drama. This course will cover his comedies, tragedies and romances starting at about 1600. The plays will be a selection (subject to change) from the following: Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, All's Well That Ends Well, Measure for Measure, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. 3 credits.

L.ENG-337: Medieval & Renaissance British Literature
A study of British literature from Beowulf to Spenser, in modern translation from Irish, Welsh, Latin, French, and Old and Middle English, as well as some in the original Middle English and much in early modern English. Representative authors: Bede, the Beowulf-poet, Marie de France, Langland, Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, Malory, Julian of Norwich, More, Skelton, Wyatt, Surrey, Raleigh, Campion, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare. 3 credits.

L.ENG-340: Romantic Age: 1798-1832
A study of English romantic theory and practice. Representative authors: Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, P. Shelley, M. Shelley, Keats. 3 credits.

L.ENG-341: Victorian Age: 1832-1901
A study of the poetry and prose of the age. Representative authors: Carlyle, Mill, Tennyson, Browning, Barrett Browning, Arnold, C. Rossetti, Ruskin. 3 credits.

L.ENG-342: Victorian Age Novel
Focuses primarily on the Victorian Age novel. Representative authors: Brontes, Dickens, Collins, Eliot, Hardy. 3 credits.

L.ENG-343: British/Irish Poetry 1900-Present
Representative authors: W.B. Yeats, Wilfred Owen, T.S. Eliot, Patrick Kavanagh, W.H. Auden, Stevie Smith, Philip Larkin, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland. 3 credits.

L.ENG-344: British Fiction 1900-Present
Representative authors: Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Huxley, Greene, Rhys, Lessing, Fowles, Byatt. 3 credits.

L.ENG-345: British Drama 1890-Present
Representative authors: Wilde, Shaw, Osborne, Delaney, Beckett, Pinter, Stoppard, Shaffer. 3 credits.

L.ENG-346: Seminar: British Major Figures 1900-Present
A seminar focusing on one or several English writers of poetry, fiction or drama. 3 credits.

L.ENG-348: Post-Colonial Literature in English
Literature in English from the current and former British Empire excluding the British Isles; emphasis on the Third World. Representative authors: Achebe, Okri, Head, Naipaul, Narayan, Rushdie, Soyinka, Walcott. 3 credits.

L.ENG-349: Writers for the 21st Century
A focused study of 21st century writers through themes and/or genre. 3 credits.

L.ENG-351: Milton & 17th Century Literature
A survey of 17th century English poetry with emphasis on Milton’s Paradise Lost. Representative authors include Donne, Herbert, Jonson, Herrick, Lovelace, Marvell, Mary Sidney Wroth, Katherine Philips. 3 credits.

L.ENG-352: 18th Century British Literature
A survey of 18th-century English literature. Representative authors include Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Blake, Mary Wortley Montagu and selected women poets. 3 credits.

L.ENG-355: English Novel: 1800-1840
A study of pre-Victorian trends in the novel. Representative authors include Austen, Edgeworth, Godwin, Scott, Shelley. 3 credits.

L.ENG-380: Nature Writing
An advanced-level workshop course in nonfiction nature writing. Students also study technique and theme in contemporary nonfiction nature writing. Representative authors include Dillard, Abbey, Ehrlich, and Bass. Students write analytical and creative works. 3 credits.

L.ENG-382: Writing Seminar
An advanced-level workshop course Topics may vary. Recent topics have included scriptwriting and playwriting. May be taken twice, with different topics. 3 credits.

L.ENG-383: Nonfiction Literature & Workshop
An advanced-level workshop in which students write memoir, meditative, and literary journalism essays while analyzing the works of published authors. Representative authors include Capote, Dillard, McCourt, Sanders. 3 credits. Fall semesters of even numbered years.

L.ENG-384: Advanced Fiction Writing
An advanced course in the art and craft of writing fiction. Prerequisite: L.ENG-237 or equivalent. May be taken twice. 3 credits.

L.ENG-385: Advanced Poetry Writing
An advanced course in the art and craft of writing poetry, intended for students with strong backgrounds in reading, writing and critiquing poetry. Prerequisite: L.ENG-238 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. May be taken twice. 3 credits. Each spring semester.

L.ENG-389: Revision, Editing & Publishing
An advanced workshop seminar devoted to a detailed study of writing style, grammar and mechanics, based on original and extensively revised student work. Prerequisites: LIB 105; at least one 200-level writing class; highly recommended: one 300-level writing class. 3 credits. January term.

L.ENG-391: Language Theory & Teaching of Writing
An exploration of language and composition theory, research and pedagogy. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111. Intended for English/Teacher Education majors and others interested in the teaching of writing. 3 credits.

L.ENG-394: English Internship
Arranged practicum in fields such as publishing, communications, or as a supervised peer writing consultant. Declared English majors only. 1-3 credits, to be used as elective credits beyond the major. Ordinarily, students are advised to enroll through the Center for Experiential Learning for internship credit.

L.ENG-468: Literary Criticism
Theoretical explanation and practical application of central concepts from classical and contemporary literary criticism. Required for all English majors. Ordinarily taken in the junior year. 3 credits.

L.ENG-490: Senior Literature Capstone-PJ
English: Literature majors work independently with faculty capstone advisors to complete Senior Literature Capstone. Culminates in Capstone Defense. Permission of Capstone Instructor required: Students must submit a request for Capstone Board to the Division Chair in order to obtain Instructor’s Permission to register. 1 credit.

L.ENG-491: Senior Thesis Seminar-PJ
Students will workshop thesis drafts and reflective essay in a workshop setting in consultation with a thesis director. Culminates in Thesis Defense. Restrictions: Senior status, Creative Writing majors only. 3 credits.

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

L.EXP-150: Labor & Catholicism
This course will examine the rights and responsibilities of both management and labor through the lens of Catholic theology and via experiential learning. It will also examine the stereotypes and misconceptions held toward both blue-collar and white-collar jobs. Specific attention will be given to Rerum Novarum, its compatibility with capitalism, and its application to historical and current labor issues. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the current immigration debate as it pertains to the right to work, the coal mine strikes in the early twentieth century, and issues surrounding labor in sport. Students will work at campus jobs and reflect on their experiences and correlate them with course material on the human dignity and hierarchical structure of work and their own past and future life experiences. 3 credits. January term.

L.EXP-194: Exploratory Internship
Variable credit.

L.EXP-250: From Bean to Cup: Producers & Consumers in the Global Coffee Chain
From Bean to Cup examines the life experiences of and interconnections between people on the two ends of the global coffee commodity chain—that is, the average consumer and the average grower. To this end, students will examine economic, environmental, and social aspects of the coffee industry in two locales—that of the consumer in the Tri-State area (Iowa, Illinois, and Wisconsin) and of the grower/producer in Latin America (i.e., Honduras). 3 credits. January term.

L.EXP-273: The Sustainable Community: The Real & the Ideal
This course explores the essential features of a sustainable community (i.e., a community that meets the basic needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of subsequent generations to meet their needs) by examining the key dimensions of sustainability as they are currently practiced in the city of Dubuque and by studying current “best practice” sustainability measures and policies. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.EXP-276: Study Abroad Pre-Departure
1 credit.

L.EXP-359: Project Design Implementation/Evaluation
Experiential learning course. See Center for Experiential Learning for more information. 3 credits.

L.EXP-370: Chicago Center Preparation
1 credit.

L.EXP-372: Chicago Internship
6 credits.

L.EXP-374: Chicago Center Service Learning
2 credits.

L.EXP-376: City as Text
Variable credit.

L.EXP-294, 394: Internship
Variable credit.

L.EXP-395: Topics.
Variable credit.

L.EXP-397: Independent Study
Variable credit.

GREEK/LATIN LANGUAGE


L.GRS-101: First Year Ancient Greek
An elementary introduction to ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, accompanied by simple readings that illustrate basic aspects of ancient Greek culture. 3 credits.

L.GRS-102: First Year Ancient Greek
An elementary introduction to ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary, accompanied by simple readings that illustrate basic aspects of ancient Greek culture. 3 credits.

L.GRS-105: First Year Latin
An elementary introduction to Latin grammar and vocabulary, accompanied by simple readings that illustrate basic aspects of ancient Roman culture. 3 credits.

L.GRS-106: First Year Latin
An elementary introduction to Latin grammar and vocabulary, accompanied by simple readings that illustrate basic aspects of ancient Roman culture. 3 credits.

L.GRS-110: Classical Mythology
A survey of the major myths of Greek and Roman culture with comparison of these stories to similar legends from other ancient peoples. Emphasis is placed upon the appearance of these myths in ancient art and literature, and upon the influence of classical myth in the culture of later periods. 3 credits.

L.GRS-201: Second Year Latin
Intermediate level study of Latin grammar and syntax, with selected readings from poets and prose authors. 3 credits.

L.GRS-205: Second Year Ancient Greek
Intermediate level study of ancient Greek grammar and syntax, with selected readings from poets and prose authors. 3 credits.

L.GRS-215: Ancient Greek Tragedy-AI
This course will focus upon a representative selection of ancient Greek tragedies (fifth century BCE), all written and performed in Athens by citizens of the city These plays were produced at an annual, public religious festival and explored issues of central importance to the community as a collective of individuals. The study of Athenian tragedy provides an extraordinarily powerful tool for encouraging students to recognize and concretize their own implicit, and socially constructed, ways of thinking. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.GRS-220: Early Christian Writers
A study of significant writings of the Greek and Latin apologists and Fathers of the Church in their historical context, to the fourth century CE. 3 credits.

L.GRS-302: Epic Heroes of Greece & Rome
Readings from ancient Greek and Roman epic poets. Key questions for the course are: what did the ancient Greeks think a hero was? How does this concept compare with the modern definition(s) of a hero? Greek authors: Homer, Apollonius. Roman authors: Vergil, Ovid. 3 credits.

L.GRS-312: Gender & Sexuality in the Ancient World
An investigation of 1) how the ancient Greeks and Romans conceptualized proper/improper gender roles in relationship to sex and age; and 2) of the relationship between these roles and the evaluation of sexual behavior. 3 credits.

L.GRS-322: Ancient Comedy & Satire
Readings from the classical satirists and comic writers. Emphasis is placed upon the development of comedy and satire as literary genres. Greek authors: Aristophanes, Lucian. Roman authors: Plautus, Terence, Horace, Juvenal, Petronius, Seneca, Apuleius. 3 credits.

HONORS

L.HON-100: Honors Modes of Inquiry-FI
Introduces students to a holistic approach to critical thinking and active learning by examining a significant cultural or historical event from a variety of perspectives. Recent offerings have focused on Tolkien’s Tensions, Genocide, the Manhattan Project, Infectious Diseases, and Wilderness vs. Civilization. 3 credits.

L.HON-130: The Catholic Tradition-MC
Develops an awareness of the religious dimensions of human experience either by exploring the lives of several significant Catholic figures or by contrasting Catholicism and another religious tradition. Examples of courses include Jesus and Gandhi; the Religious Imagination; Seasons of the Sacred, Icon, Cross, and Crescent: Mediterranean Spirituality; Monastery Voices: The Monasticism of Saint Benedict, Thomas Merton and Joan Chittiser; and Priest, Minister and Rabbi. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.CTL-100 or L.HON-100. 3 credits.

L.HON-135: The Catholic Tradition-MC
Develops an awareness of the religious dimensions of human experience either by exploring the lives of several significant Catholic figures or by contrasting Catholicism and another religious tradition. Examples of courses include Jesus and Gandhi; the Religious Imagination; Seasons of the Sacred, Icon, Cross, and Crescent: Mediterranean Spirituality; Monastery Voices: The Monasticism of Saint Benedict, Thomas Merton and Joan Chittiser; and Priest, Minister and Rabbi. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.CTL-100 or L.HON-100. 3 credits.

L.HON-220: Democracy & Global Diversity-MD
Utilizes an innovative program called Reacting to the Past to learn how diverse groups of people work to achieve democracy. Students play roles in games which provide a fun, interactive environment to think actively and in creative ways about how people have sought to build democracies in particular historical and social contexts. This course will ask students to think deeply about the idea of democracy and some of the complexities involved in applying that idea to real-world situations. Recent simulations include the French Revolution in 1791; India on the eve of independence from Great Britain in 1945; South Africa in 1993 at the end of Apartheid; and Athens during the Trial of Socrates. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.CTL-100 or L.HON-100, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, and L.LIB-110. 3 credits.

L.HON-273: Humanity in the Physical Universe-AH
Courses in this area will address the following questions: What is the scientific method? What is the nature and role of truth, evidence, and proof in science? How can science be used to place important public & philosophical issues in context? Prerequisites: L.HON-100 or L.CTL-100, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.HON-130, L.HON-135, L-CTL 130, or L.LIB-220 (L.HON-220). 4 credits.

L.HON-274: Identity & Community-AI
Courses in this area will focus on how human identity is formed, on the ways in which humans are social and psychological beings that create their identity through everyday interactions with other people and institutions. Prerequisites: L.HON-100 or L.CTL-100, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.HON-130, L.HON-135, L-CTL 130, or L.LIB-220 (L.HON-220). 3 credits.

L.HON-275: The Aesthetic Dimension of Human Experience-AA
Courses in this area will address the ways in which writers, artists, or composers express meaning through the structure of their work and how the fine arts or literature articulate and transform cultural values and meanings in a civilization. Prerequisites: L.HON-100 or L.CTL-100, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.HON-130, L.HON-135, L-CTL 130, or L.LIB-220 (L.HON-220). 3 credits.

L.HON-277: Foundations for Values & Decisions-AV
Courses in this area will consider how one formulates a reasonable and coherent set of moral values, whether there are moral principles that are affirmed across cultures, and how one connects moral reflection to action and to philosophy of life. Prerequisites: L.HON-100 or L.CTL-100, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.HON-130, L.HON-135, L-CTL 130, or L.LIB-220 (L.HON-220). 3 credits.

L.HON-278: Cultural Traditions Across Generations-AC
Courses in this area will explore the nature of culture, how factors such as gender, class, and ethnicity affect the ways in which humans interact within a culture, and how cultures both change and retain continuity throughout human experience. Prerequisites: L.HON-100 or L.CTL-100, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.HON-130, L.HON-135, L-CTL 130, or L.LIB-220 (L.HON-220). 3 credits.

L.HON-290/291, 390/391, 490/491-PJ: Honors Inquiry
Each Honors student will be part of a small learning community dedicated to discovering a meaningful social, community, or global problem, researching its context, and designing a solution. Honors Inquiry will evolve small groups of students from diverse academic interests through a process of reflection, investigation, and large group discourse. Formed in the first year, these small groups will focus attention in the first year to developing questions and arriving at strategies for further study. In the second year, these small groups will explore the contexts for the problems they have identified in order to establish a thorough understanding of the complex and inter-related issues related to their problems. Finally, during their last two years groups will design detailed plans for solving the problems they confront. 1 credit each semester for 5 of final 6 semesters.

L.HON-488: Capstone Abstract & Presentation
Each Honors student will supplement the senior capstone project in the major by taking this 1 credit course, usually in the same semester as the major project is completed. L.HON-488 will require a student to produce an abstract and an annotated bibliography, provide a public presentation of the work open to all members of the Loras community and especially the Honors Program, and participate in a defense of the work with a committee of faculty. 1 credit.

HISTORY


L.HIS-116: Ancient Greek Civilization
A survey of ancient Greek history and culture from the Bronze Age of heroes of the Trojan War through the Hellenistic period ushered in by Alexander the Great. The course will try to answer the questions “who were the ancient Greeks and why are they worth studying today?” by examining the history, art, and literature they produced. 3 credits.

L.HIS-117: Roman Civilization
A survey of Roman history and culture from the mysterious Etruscan period and the legendary founding of Rome through the fall of the western half of the Empire. The course will try to answer the questions “who were the Romans and why are they worth studying today?” by examining the history, art, and literature they produced. 3 credits.

L.HIS-121: United States To 1877
The founding, expansion, and development of the United States from discovery and colonization to the Reconstruction era. 3 credits.

L.HIS-122: United States Since 1865
United States history from the end of the Civil War to the present. 3 credits. Each spring semester.

L.HIS-140: Early Modern Europe To 1750
A study of the political, cultural and intellectual developments of Europe to 1750. 3 credits.

L.HIS-141: Modern Europe Since 1750
A study of the political, cultural, and intellectual development of Europe. 3 credits.

L.HIS-155: Introduction to Latin American History
A one-semester introductory survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian civilizations to the present. 3 credits.

L.HIS-161: Modern Africa since 1800
A survey of sub-Saharan Africa during the age of European exploration, conquest, and colonization. Topics include the revolutions in West and Southern Africa; abolition of the slave trade; European exploration and trade; military conquest and African resistance; white settlers in Africa; British, French, and German colonial rule; the economics of western colonialism; the emergence of African elites and the growth of African nationalism. 3 credits.

L.HIS-170: East Asian Civilization
A historical survey of East Asian civilization from its beginnings to the present, covering pre-modern China, with special attention to Confucianism and its influence on political institutions and society, pre-modern Korea and Japan, with an emphasis on these two nations adaptation of the Chinese model of civilization, and modern East Asia, with an emphasis on Western intrusion into East Asia, the development of Japanese imperialism and militarism, the Communist revolution in China, and the rise of the East Asian economies after World War II. 3 credits.

L.HIS-175: Themes in World History
Instead of striving for a comprehensive coverage of world history, this course focuses on a few selected themes, such as migration, gender, warfare, and revolutions. Each theme will be examined in global and comparative perspectives. The emphasis of the course is placed on the modern world, but pre-modern influences and patterns will also be explored in some of the themes. 3 credits.

L.HIS-225: Confederates: Virtual & Real-AI
The Confederate States of America ceased its “real” life with Lee’s surrender in 1865. But ever since then it has taken on a “virtual” existence of regional consciousness, neo-confederate ideology, agrarianism and anti-governmental centralization. By means of primary sources, material and popular cultural artifacts, films and literature, the course will focus on questions of identity and community raised by its “virtual” existence. Prerequisites: LIB100, LIB 105, LIB 110 and one course from LIB 130, LIB 135, or LIB 220.

L.HIS-226: Catholi-schism Controversy-AI
An (AI) Identity and Community offering that explores issues that are controversial or over which US Catholics are in fundamental disagreement. Issues will be approached from the perspective of Catholic individuals’ and groups’ self-identity and sub-group identity. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-227: The March for Life
This course will be a Study Travel Course. The study-travel component will center in preparing for, actually participating in the March For Life and reflectively processing the participation experience. It will also involve participating in and processing a visit to Network: A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-229: African American History-AI
This course studies the African American experience from slavery to the present focusing on the formation of both personal and community identities in light of the experience of slavery and racism. Key to our exploration of African American identity will be resistance and reform. The course will also place a heavy emphasis on African American musical traditions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-220, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.HIS-230: Community & Identity in the American West-AI
This course focuses primarily on the interaction of Native Americans, Hispanics and the diverse population of immigrants (Euro-American, African-American, Chinese and European) who settled in United States territories west of the Mississippi River during the nineteenth century. Through primary source texts, objects, artwork and music, students will explore individual identity and how a group of individuals uses culture to build community. We will study how the interactions within a shared culture transform personal identities as well as how interactions across cultures shape each community. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-231: History of U.S. Sexuality-AV
The contemporary dialogue over sexual values and conflicts regarding sexual-decision making are not new to the American experience. In fact, scholars organize the history of American sexuality around "contested moments" in the debate over sexual ethics and behaviors. From the initial settlement of Europeans in the New World and their contact with the worldview of Native Americans to the more recent "sexual revolutions" of the modern era, Americans debated sex. The predominant ethical framework governing that conversation reflects the dominance of Protestant Christianity in American culture. Other ideological frameworks deriving from science, gender construction, economic patterns, racism and generational conflict also drive the evolution of sexual value sets. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-220, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.HIS-232: Herbert Hoover & the Great Depression
When elected in 1928, people perceived Herbert Hoover as a caring, compassionate, humanitarian. By 1932, American citizens believed he did not care about the people—some blamed him for the depression and to others his name became synonymous with Satan. Why did this transformation in public opinion happen? This J-term course will explore this question by studying the effects of the Great Depression on the American populace and their response. It also examines the character and actions of Herbert Hoover both before and during his presidency. Key to our study will be the archival collections of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum in West Branch, Iowa. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-235: Race & Gender Reform in the United States-AC
The course focuses on the struggles for racial and gender equality that took place in the United U.S. during the 19th and 20th centuries. During the 19th century the struggle to eradicate slavery--the abolition movement--contributed to the evolution of a women’s rights movement; more recently, the civil rights movement helped to stimulate the women’s liberation movement. This course compares and contrasts these movements for racial and gender justice. We will study the past, but also bring our historical query to the present with a study of contemporary social movements. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-236: Art & Archaeology of Greece & Rome
A study of the sites and artifacts of ancient Greek and Roman material culture. Includes an introduction to archaeological theory and methods, and an examination of the physical remains, as well as an interpretation of those artifacts to help reconstruct the ancient lifeways of these prolific cultures. 3 credits. Dependent on staff and demand.

L.HIS-239: United States Women’s History-AC
This course focuses on the evolving concept of gender identity in American society. We will compare and contrast the experiences of women of varying ethnic, class, racial, and regional identities. Women labored at home and for wages. They built and influenced families, communities and organizations. They worked to reform society, shaping the social, political and economic world through their efforts. We will trace the evolution of women’s rights and gender equity from the early 1600s to the present. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-240: Greek Odyssey-AC
This course is an overseas study course. The students will investigate how the physical remains of an ancient culture, studied over different time periods, reveal changes in the culture’s social structure, political institutions, economic forces, technological advancements, etc. Although the focus of the study trip will be to examine physical sites and artifacts, wherever possible students will read primary literary sources that offer insights from the ancient Greeks themselves into their own culture. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-245: The Celts-AC
The Celts- Hags, Druids, and Saints pace the pages of Celtic myth and folklore, entrancing audiences and readers with stories of personal dilemmas, heroism, and magic. This course will analyze comparatively some Irish and Welsh myths, study the evolution of the legend of St. Patrick, and read fairy tales in an effort to understand important cultural realities and the social changes they reflect. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-246: Chicago’s Art & Architecture-AA
The course will begin on the Loras campus with an examination of classical forms of both art and architecture from ancient Greece and Rome. Students will create timelines, outlines, and files of visual images and consider their own surroundings, first on a practice run in Dubuque and then in Chicago, to make connections between the ancient and modern worlds of art and architecture and adding to their visual files. Students will return to Loras to create a Tour of Chicago that features items and locales that reflect classical clues in Chicago’s Art and Architecture. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-249: Russian Civilization-AC
A study of Russian history with a special emphasis on the cultural context. The course starts with a brief overview of pre-Petrine Russia, but places the emphasis on imperial Russia (from Peter the Great to 1917) and Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. Students are expected to develop an in-depth understanding of continuity and change in Russian civilization and of the differences and similarities between Russian civilization and Western civilization. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-255: United States/Latin American Relations
A survey of Interamerican relations with emphasis on the period from the Spanish-American War (1898) to the present and on U.S. relations with Latin America. 3 credits.

L.HIS-257: Modern Brazilian History & Culture-AC
This course examines the history of Latin America’s largest geographic and most populous nation from the arrival of the Portuguese Court in 1808 to present. Focus will be on issues such as the dynamics and legacies of the world’s largest slave society, economic growth and industrialization, political organization and participation, liberalism, populism, authoritarianism and democracy, urbanization, race relations, European and Asian immigration to Brazil, ethnic and gender identities, regionalism, and elements of popular culture such as music, the arts, and sports. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-272: Japan in the Modern World–AI
This course is a study of modern Japanese history since the Meiji Restoration (1868), emphasizing: (1) Japan’s Westernization and contesting views of the national identity after the Meiji Restoration; (2) the Japanese view of themselves and other nations during World War II and the contesting national identities of the Japanese as victims or victimizers in the postwar discourse on war experience and responsibility; (3) the transformation of group identities brought about by economic development and social changes in Japan since 1945. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-275: History As Film: East Asia
This course examines themes in East Asian history dramatized in select feature films. Films to be viewed and critiqued in class include Genghis Khan: To the Ends of the Eath and Sea and The Last Samurai. A feature film on a historical theme is a piece of art, but it interprets history. While it is not a source of historical knowledge, its interpretation of history can and should be evaluated or critiqued; such evaluations or critiques would help us develop a more sophisticated understanding of the past. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.HIS-277: Modern Chinese History & Culture-AC
A study of China from the Opium War (1839-1842) to the present, with an emphasis on cultural history. This course examines how political, economic, and cultural changes during the last one and half centuries have altered the sense the Chinese have of themselves and of China’s place in the world. It also examines how cultural tradition persists in China through changes. This course satisfies advanced general education requirement in the ‘Cultural Traditions across Generations” category. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-278: Chinese Cities in the Past & Present
This study travel course explores China’s urban history and far-reaching changes taking place in Chinese cities. Students travel to Beijing, the imperial capital during the last three dynasties and the capital of today’s People’s Republic of China; Shanghai, the largest city in China; Suzhou, a historical city that Marco Polo compared to Venice. Themes to be studied include (1) the development of cities and their political and economic roles in imperial China, (2) physical and spatial features of and the social and cultural contexts that created these features, (3) traditional Chinese gardens and the underlying philosophical and aesthetic views, (4) China’s current accelerated urbanization and urban planning, and (5) the social and cultural transformation of Chinese cities. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-282: History as Film: Africa-AC
This course explores three cultural traditions--American, European, African--as represented in their dramatic/action films on African history, and helps develop an awareness of fundamental differences between western (American/European) and African perceptions of Africa, as long-standing western/African cultural traditions. The course will address issues of change and continuity in American and European cultural imaging of Africa; African critiques of American and European historical films; African stereotypes as reflections of evolving American and European race consciousness. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-285: The Arab-Israeli Conflict
The Arab-Israeli Conflict is an interactive course that will educate students about the complexities of the relationship between Israel, Palestinians, and their Middle Eastern neighbors and will engage students interactively with sources and people through reading, role play, and personal contact with people who are impacted by the situation, and institutional peace efforts, grass-roots action toward reconciliation, and voices of dissent in both Palestinian and Jewish communities. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-288: Historical Method
An introductory course for history majors or potential majors that deals with historical methodologies by means of primary and secondary source materials drawn from US history. Much attention will be given to identifying, constructing, reconstructing and critiquing historical interpretations. Students must earn a grade of C or better for the major. 3 credits.

L.HIS-306: Historians of Greece & Rome
Readings from the classical historians. Emphasis is placed upon the development of history as a literary genre and an intellectual endeavor. Greek authors: Herodotus, Thucydides, Polybius, Plutarch. Roman authors: Caesar, Sallust, Livy, Tacitus, Suetonius. 3 credits.

L.HIS-329: The Enlightenment
An examination of the major institutions of eighteenth-century European society and the social history of ideas, particularly the contrast between elite and popular culture, and the primary social criticisms and reforms proposed by Enlightenment writers, such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, and the Encyclopedists. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-330: The French Revolution
The causes and course of the revolution including the origins of modern political culture in the Enlightenment and the revolution, international repercussions, terror, social consequences, and the Napoleonic period. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-333: Imperial Geographies-AA
This course will study how the aesthetics of urban design and architecture from the late 19th century to present are symbolic of key questions that speak to imperialism, colonialism, nationalism, and the postcolonial condition. The course material will consider how architects, geographers, urban planners, and certain political and social classes engaged the legacy of colonialism and the politics of nationalism in their work and practices. Attention will be paid to the spatial organization of colonial and postcolonial cities, the politics of architectural and urban design, and the aesthetic nature of urban iconography. Case studies will be drawn from various cities throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, and the Caribbean. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.HIS-340: The Age of Kings & Conversions: Medieval Europe, 476-1075
An exploration of the vivacious and complex world of barbarians and monks, pagans and Christians, queens and bishops. Questions about historical interpretation and analysis of evidence are important to the study and understanding of this period. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-341: The Age of Love & Reason: Medieval Europe, 1075-1530
A thematic study of the late medieval period that addresses issues of importance for that age and of interest for the modern world. Important themes will include love and marriage, chivalry, heresy, architecture and representation, individual and communal identity, the formation of nation-states, the Crusades, popular culture, intellectual developments, and the Italian Renaissance. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-342: The Reformation-AI
The Reformation was by all accounts a spectacular event. Framed by the bitter denunciations of Martin Luther and the rigid restrictions of the Index of Forbidden books, enlivened by theological debate and mortified by extreme violence, the Reformation was to the people of the sixteenth century inspiring yet harsh and provided absolute certainty while at the same time provoking unimaginable confusion and complexity. How did it respond to the question, “What does it mean to be a Christian”. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220.3 credits.

L.HIS-343: Medieval Christianity
A study of the development of western Christianity in the Middle Ages, with particular attention to formative influences, definitive tensions, diverse perceptions and popular appeal. The most important themes are monasticism, sanctity, heresy, and the spiritual expressions of women and men. Less emphasis upon institutional history. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-344: Celtic Christianity & Roman Catholicism
This is a study travel course to England, Ireland, and Scotland, exploring historical places associated with the earliest Christians in those areas. Focusing especially on the collaboration and conflict between the Celtic Christianity of Ireland, Wales, and Scotland and the Roman Christianity spreading from the south of England, the course will examine the transition from paganism to Christianity and the conceptual realities that made that both possible and challenging. Destinations may vary each time the course is taught. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-346: Isle of the Saints: A Study Tour-AI
Through travel and study in Ireland, this course examines medieval Irish society, including law, genealogy, and tribal affiliation, from the beginnings of Irish “history” in the fourth century A.D. to the religious and political turmoil of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when Continental calls for Reformation joined with Tudor and Cromwellian assertions of power to force Irish people to reorganize their communities and their sense of identity. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS 348: Paris in the 1920’s & 1930’s
Paris in the 20s was the place to be. There you could find a fusion of the latest, most daring trends in art, music and literature and a haven for those who had no "home" to speak of- displaced Russian nobility who had fled their homeland after the Revolution; Africans from various French colonies who had come to Paris to study; American Blacks who had come to escape repressive Jim Crow laws. We will examine this period through art, music, literature, journalism. 3 credits.

L.HIS-349: The Second World War
The causes of the war, the European and Pacific campaigns, the civilian reaction, the Holocaust, resistance movements and the origins of the Cold War. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-360: Southern Africa Since 1800
An examination of the impact of white settler rule in the region of Southern Africa, which includes countries of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Topics include settler colonialism; the imperial scramble for colonies; British and Portuguese colonial rule; the regional mine labor system; Apartheid, and African struggles for independence. Restriction: not open to first-year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-365: Contemporary Urban Portugal
The main content of the course will investigate the various historical and geographical issues surrounding the fall and legacies of the Portuguese empire in Africa such as national identity and geopolitics, migration, and subsequent changes to the cultural landscape and human geography of the metropolitan Lisbon area. Students will have the opportunity to study these themes firsthand by visiting many of Lisbon’s historic and newly constructed neighborhoods, museums, monuments, and community centers that speak to these dynamic issues. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-380: The Cold War
A study of the Cold War as a global confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union and as a global conflict between Communism and capitalism. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, nuclear weapons and the Cold War, ideologies of the Cold War and propaganda, the Third World and the Cold War, and the end of the Cold War. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-385: Peace & Justice in Israel & Palestine
This course is a travel learning experience in which students will develop an understanding of the sources of conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, interact with people of various religious traditions and cultural heritages who are directly affected by the adversity in the region, and reflect on various efforts to resolve tensions there. The course will travel to locations in Israel and Palestine. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.HIS-386: United States Survey for Teachers
Designed to prepare K-12 teachers of social studies and United States history, this course develops the ability to conceptualize and define the American past in order to teach United States history, this course provides models and tools for determining the overarching themes that help explain and explore the American past using a wide variety of methods. Students will identify resources that help teachers make decisions on what to teach, define historical trends, and analyze reading strategies in the field of history including reading comprehension and critical reading. Required for the endorsement in American History and the All Social Sciences Teaching endorsement. Restricted to Teacher Education students only. 3 credits.

L.HIS-392: History as Film
This course examines the uses of film as sources of historical knowledge, principally through documentaries but also through semi-documentaries and fictional films. Non-traditional materials of historians (motion-picture films) as well as traditional materials (written sources) will enhance significantly the student's interest in and understanding of modern history. Topics vary and will be determined by the availability of films and students' interest. 3 credits.

L.HIS-395: Topics
History topics course. Used to develop courses which have not been approved under another catalog number. See Division Chair for more information.

L.HIS-404: Historical Geography
An historical overview of the major developments in formal, practical, and popular global geopolitics from the late 19thcentury to present. The material will examine the origins, application, and outcomes of geopolitical theories related to cartography; empire and imperialism; nation building and nationalism; decolonization and independence; the Cold War; and the multi-faceted dimensions of globalization. This course will partially satisfy the geography requirement for the All-Social Science teaching endorsement. Sophomores and above. 3 credits.

L.HIS-427: United States Catholicism
The history of Roman Catholics and Roman Catholicism in the U.S. from colonial beginnings to the present with special emphasis on the changes in and anomalies of Catholic identity. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-431: Revolutionary Era in the United States
The U.S. in the 18th century, development of British imperial policy and reactions to it, the break from the British empire, experiments in new forms of self-government and the framing, ratification and implementation of the U.S. Constitution in the 1790's. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-439: The Creation of Modern America, 1877-1924
This course concentrates on the incredible transformation of society that took place in the United States between 1877 and 1924. The changes of this period resulted in the creation of modern American society. To understand the 20th century we must understand the changes begun during the Gilded Age and completed by the 1920's. Because these changes took place in almost every area of society, this course will draw upon social, cultural, economic, diplomatic, and political history. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-443: Civil War & Reconstruction
The U.S. from the 1840's through the 1870's with emphasis on the causes of the war, military operations of the conflict and its impact on the U.S., the difficulties of reconciling the former enemies. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-449: Populists, Progressives & the Labor Movement, 1870-1919
Many people protested the incredible transformation of their lives that occurred in the U.S. during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This course concentrates on the problems created by the changes of the Gilded Age and how people coped with them. To improve their lives and to impose order on a chaotic world, farmers, laborers and middle-class progressives demanded reform through populism, labor unions and the progressive movement. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. L.HIS-439 recommended, but not required. 3 credits.

L.HIS-453: The Great Depression & the New Deal
A study of the Great Depression in the United States, including its origins, the consequences of depression on U.S. society and the New Deal as a response to the crisis. Different perspectives based on race, gender, age and region will be discussed. This course will also examine the legacy of the New Deal, including the evolution of the social welfare state, the transformation of the role of government in society and the expansion of the power of the president. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-455: United States History Since 1945
The political, social, and economic history of the U.S. from the end of World War II to the present including the evolution of Cold War politics and major changes in U.S. society. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.HIS-456: The Civil Rights Movement
A focus on organizations, and to a lesser degree on their leaders, involved in the post-World War II struggle for racial equality in southern and northern states. Organizations studied include the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panthers, the Nation of Islam, and a sample of local action groups. 3 credits.

L.HIS-472: The United States & Vietnam
A history of the Vietnam wars and their impact on both Vietnam and the United States. The course will highlight the historical development of Vietnamese society, French colonialism, the Cold War politics of F.D.R. through Nixon, the military history of U.S involvement, and the turmoil on the U.S. home front. Open to seniors and juniors, sophomores with approval. 3 credits.

L.HIS-489: Seminar for Majors: Interpretations
This seminar presents a critical examination of the major events and issues in European history, historians' interpretations of these events and issues, and problems of historical research and methodology. The focus is Eurocentric. The scope is global. Open only to senior or junior history majors, normally in their second semester junior year. Students must earn a grade of C or better for the major. 3 credits.

L.HIS-490: Research Seminar
Emphasis in this course is on research and the production of quality papers based on primary and secondary materials. For history majors only, normally in their senior year. Cannot be repeated more than once. Students must earn a grade of C or better for the major. 3 credits.

L.HIS-494: Internship in History
This internship will provide students with a learning experience while working several hours a week for a semester or during the summer for a historical society, history firm, museum, archive, research library, or some equivalent institution. Prerequisites: senior or junior standing, completion of 12 credits in history prior to the beginning of the internship, and permission of the division chair and the work supervisor of the internship at the institution where the internship will be performed. 2-3 credits (a minimum of 50 hours of work required per credit).
 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

L.INS-489: Senior Seminar
A thesis-preparation seminar culminating in a public defense on a topic derived from the student’s concentration. Students are expected to develop a research paper that contributes to the literature. 3 credits.

L.INS-494: Internship in International Studies
Students are encouraged to participate in internships that expose them to the nature and variety of internationally-related careers. Such internships include working as an intern in a governmental or nongovernmental organization involved in international matters or a business organization with international exposure, work organized as part of studies abroad, and research and campus activities at Loras College. Proposal and credits are to be arranged in consultation with the Director of the International Studies Program. Junior and senior standing.

KINESIOLOGY

L.KIN-070 through 077: Instruction on the skills, strategies, and rules of different sports and physical activity will be presented and students will have the opportunity to practice their knowledge in active situations. Students will participate in multiple sports or activities throughout the semester, as organized by category. Course fees may be assessed in some activity classes and students may be asked to provide their own equipment or arrange for their own transportation to facilities.

L.KIN-070: Outdoor Activities
Credit granted for participation in this course only once. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.KIN-071: Individual Sports
Credit granted for participation in this course only once. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.KIN-072: Racquet Sports
Credit granted for participation in this course only once. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.KIN-074: Team Sports I
Credit granted for participation in this course only once. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.KIN-075: Individual Exercise
Credit granted for participation in this course only once. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.KIN-076: Ice Activities
Credit granted for participation in this course only once. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.KIN-077: Swimming
Credit granted for participation in this course only once. Graded pass/fail only. 1 credit.

L.KIN-101: Introduction to Kinesiology
This course provides an introduction to the study of physical activity that will include analysis of the importance of physical activity, the knowledge base of the discipline, and careers in physical activity professions. Emphasis will be on the understanding of the integrative nature of the discipline and the application of principles from the fields of motor behavior, sport and exercise psychology, sport sociology, and biomechanics to kinesiology and sport science careers. First and second year students only. 3 credits.

L.KIN-121: Personal & Community Health Education
A course in the fundamentals of health, including; public and community health, consumer health and substance abuse. An introduction to methods used in preventing disease in the individual and the community. This course requires 5 hours of community based learning. 3 credits.

L.KIN-135: Sport Officiating
The course presents a current, understandable and practical framework beneficial to both prospective and experienced sports officials. Provides special instruction for kinesiology major students as well as prospective coaches. 3 credits.

L.KIN-244: Theory of Coaching
Prospective high school and college coaches are introduced to multiple issues surrounding the coaching profession. Students will be subject to philosophical, ethical, managerial and legal issues as they pertain to all team and individual sports. 3 credits.

L.PHE-336: Motor Development & Skill Acquisition
This course is intended to give individuals who wish to teach elementary or secondary physical education an introduction to the processes and products of motor development from conception to adulthood. This course will define models of human development, factors affecting motor development, and a three-stage approach to observing and assessing fundamental movement patterns in a laboratory and physical education classroom setting. This course requires 5 hours of community based learning. Prerequisite: L.SSC-230. L.PHE-205 is recommended. 3 credits.

L.KIN-393: Practicum in Physical Activity & Health
This course provides the opportunity to gain practical experience in an off campus setting. Restricted to Kinesiology majors or Iowa Coaching minors only. 3 credits.

LIBERAL ARTS


L.LIB-100: Modes of Inquiry-FI
An introduction to active learning in the liberal arts and to the transition to college through study of a concrete event or issue. Student dispositions, critical thinking and argumentative writing will be introduced. This requirement may be waived for non-first year students upon transfer of 15 credits of post-secondary coursework (non-exam credit only) from an accredited institution, or for adult first-year students. 3 credits.

L.LIB-105: College Writing-FW
An aims-based writing course focusing on informative, analytical, argumentative, and expressive writing. Includes instruction on research-based writing. Emphasizes pre-writing, organization, revision, and editing. 3 credits.

L.LIB-110: Public Speaking & Group Communication-FS
Designed to develop effective speaking before audiences through understanding of rhetorical principles and through practice in construction, delivering, and evaluating informative and persuasive speeches within the public and group arena. Fulfills the oral communication college requirement. 3 credits.

L.LIB-112: Survey of Math Models-FM
Students will learn to apply simple mathematical models to the analysis of real-world problems. By studying mathematical modeling students will experience mathematics as a liberal art and develop an appreciation for the use of mathematics for interdisciplinary studies and for use with real work applications. Common course offerings include: Survey of Mathematics, Mathematics of Games, and Math for Survival. Prerequisite: 3 years of high school mathematics including a year of Algebra II or a grade of C- or higher in L.MAT-091. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3-4 credits. January term.

L.LIB-130: Catholic Voices-MC
This course will have as its primary focus the “voices” of three mystics: Catherine of Genoa (late 15th/early 16th century Italian Saint), Hieronymus Bosch (late 15th/early 16th century Dutch painter) and Anthony De Mello, SJ (20th century Jesuit from India, spirit master, retreat director, psychologist and best-selling author). Catherine’s voice will emerge from her teachings as set down by her disciples, Bosch’s from his paintings and De Mello’s from selections from one of his many books. We will consider questions such as: what is a mystic? Why did past mystics practice heroic self-denial? Did they have privileged access to God? How? Do all people have mystical potential? What enables mystics to focus so single-mindedly on the unseen and unknowable? Do mystics “know” God differently than others? Do the experiences and teachings of these three mystics have anything to say to our time and our culture? Does De Mello’s syncretism have anything to teach us about how Catholicism could relate to other major faiths in the 21st century? It will also be useful for comparing non-neo-Platonic mysticism with the earlier medieval variety. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-130: Empowered Catholic Women-MC
Joan claimed to hear saints’ voices. Teresa described uniting with God in trances. Despite their strange experiences, both women were effective in the “real” world. Joan saved a nation from extinction. Teresa reformed the Carmelite order and wrote inspirational books. Sor Juana dared challenge women’s role in society. Evita Perón and Dorothy Day created influential movements for social justice. This course will examine the lives of these women within the Catholic tradition. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-130: The Heart of the Matter-MC
Eveyln Waugh (1903-1966), Graham Greene (1904-1991), and Flannery O‘Connor (1925-1964), three significant Catholic figures of the mid-twentieth century, were very different in temperament, style of expression, and relationship to the institutional church. Given these differences, the course will attempt to uncover each author‘s convictions about the Catholic themes of sacramentality, mediation, and communion. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-130: Monastery Voices-MC
What are monasteries, what role have they played in history, and what insights about the need for reflective time can they offer the rest of us in our busy modern lives? How have monks and nuns--seemingly "separated" from the world for so much of their lives--been able to speak with such clarity on social and civic issues? These are the kinds of questions to be pursued in Monastery Voices as students study the background of monasteries, read the works of Thomas Merton and other modern/contemporary world-savvy contemplatives and investigate related topics through group research and presentations. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-130: Seasons of the Sacred-MC
This course examines the nature of Roman Catholicism through an investigation of the principal seasons and feasts of the Church Year. Each and every time the Church gathers to pray, it recalls the Paschal Mystery of Christ by unfolding particular aspects of the salvation offered by God. Through an immersion in primary liturgical texts, this course compares Christ and salvation via three liturgical vantage points: Advent-Christmas; Lent-Easter; and select other feasts of the Liturgical Year. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-130: Social Justice Today-MC
This course will look at the intersection of the Catholic faith with the quest for social justice in the contemporary world. This course will not deal directly with economic and political analyses of social issues. Rather, it will examine how, in three different contexts (Third World India, contemporary Italy, and Communist Eastern Europe), Catholics have found resources in their faith to struggle against social injustice in varying ways. The course will focus on three individuals: Mother Teresa, Rocco Buttiglione, and Pope John Paul II, but will deal with issues that transcend the lives of these individuals. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-130: Three French Guys-MC
France’s faith legacy includes Frédéric Ozanam (founder of the St. Vincent de Paul Society), Jacques Fesch (convicted murderer who converted to Christianity) and Jérôme Lejeune (geneticist who detected the cause of Trisomy 21/Down’s Syndrome). Study, service and other encounters apply sacramentality, mediation, and communion to the Catholic perspective about God, Scripture, justice and mercy, human dignity and society. Appropriate for social work, criminal justice, and health science students. 3 credits. January term.

L.LIB-130: The Inner & Outer Worlds of the Worldly Mystics-MC
Mystics hunger for God. “Worldly Mystics” experience a most intense desire for God but they face great difficulty in satisfying it due to competing worldly demands. This course will explore three such individuals: one female saint (St. Catherine of Genoa), one medieval artist (Hieronymus Bosch) and one antebellum American priest (Isaac Hecker). Through their writings, paintings and teachings we will discover the extreme interior psychological and religious tensions of being “torn between two worlds:” the inner hunger for communion with God and the outer demands of daily life. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-130: Witnesses to Hope, Heart & Humanity-MC
This course traces the notes of sacramentality, mediation, and communion in the writings and life experiences of the Pope John Paul II, Thérèse of Lisieux, and Jean Vanier. The following sub-themes figure prominently in the course: the role of the material and the sensible in communicating the presence of God; the reciprocity of giving and receiving in the loving exchange between God and humans, and among humans themselves; the necessity of prayer, virtue, artistic expression, and leisure as perfective elements of life; and the solidarity of work, celebration, and sacrifice as constitutive of the human community, irrespective of our personal limitations. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-135. Sacramentality, Mediation, and Communion-MC
This course will help students to develop an awareness of the spiritual and religious dimension of human experience and to clarify the beliefs and attitudes of the Catholic viewpoint, especially as exemplified by the Christ-centered principles of sacramentality, mediation, and communion, (by studying the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas) through a comparison with the viewpoint of Taoism (by studying the thought of Lao Tzu), with special attention paid to how each view understands God/The Source and the origin, nature, and purpose of humankind. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-135. Catholicism and African Tribal Religions-MC
This course explores the rituals imbedded in Catholicism and African tribal religions (primarily in western Africa), with particular attention to water ritual, the idea of communicating with saints/ancestors as intercessors, the concept of sacrifice, the critical importance of communion and common prayer. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-135: Spiritual Journeys-MC
A comparative study of how Catholicism and another religious tradition (e.g. Protestantism, Judaism, ancient polytheism) have imagined the spiritual journey. Along with an overview of each religious tradition, we will devote most of our energy to studying Dante's Divine Comedy and one other spiritual and literary masterpiece (e.g. The Odyssey, The Aeneid, Pilgrim’s Progress, The Book of Exodus, and The Faerie Queene). Topics will include spiritual, ethical, and theological issues, including the nature of the divine, the relationship between the human and the divine, the afterlife, and ethical values. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-135: Priests, Ministers, Rabbis-MC
This course primarily examines the nature of Roman Catholicism by comparing and contrasting it to Judaism and some of the more prominent Protestant Christian traditions. More specifically, this course investigates the similarities and differences between the ordained leaders of those communities – Roman Catholic Priests, Protestant Ministers, and Jewish Rabbis. Prerequisite: L.LIB-100. 3 credits.

L.LIB-220: Democracy/Global Diversity-MD
An introduction to basic questions about the human person and intercultural diversity related to an exploration of democratic traditions in a comparative global perspective. Students will compare and contrast a western democracy with a non-western society at a moment of a major event or crisis. Although a historical examination, the course will also promote critical analysis and make connections to the modern issues still implicit in the values presented as principles of the two civilizations. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, and L.LIB-110. 3 credits.

MATHEMATICS


L.MAT-091: Intermediate Algebra
This course is designed to prepare the student for college-level (100-level) coursework in Mathematics. The course covers arithmetic, pre-algebra, and elementary and intermediate algebra, including linear equations and linear functions and applications, exponents, scientific notation, and elementary geometry. 4 credits.

L.MAT-110: Mathematics for Elementary & Middle School Teachers I
This course begins to develop the solid foundation in K-8 mathematics needed by future elementary and middle school teachers. Guided by the content areas listed in the NCTM’s Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, this course will focus on Numbers and Operations and patterns (under the Algebra standard). In addition, this course will introduce students to professional recommendations and state requirements for mathematics instruction and provide students with a global perspective on mathematics achievement. This course does not fulfill mathematical modeling general education requirements. Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics including one year of Algebra II or a grade of C- or better in L.MAT-091. 4 credits. Current or future education majors only.

L.MAT-111: Mathematics for Elementary & Middle School Teachers II-FM
This course provides further instruction on K-8 mathematics for prospective elementary and middle school teachers. MAT-111 focuses on the remaining three of the five NCTM content standards: Geometry, Measurement, and Probability, and continues to develop the Algebra standard. The course topics are taught using teaching techniques appropriate for elementary and middle school, including guided discovery and other student-centered approaches. This course satisfies the modeling with Mathematics requirement. Current or future education majors only. Prerequisite: L.MAT-110. 4 credits.

L.MAT-113: College Algebra-FM
Advanced work in algebra, functions and graphing in the context of mathematical models. Topics include linear, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions and regression. Prerequisite: Three years of high school mathematics including one year of Algebra II or a grade of C- or better in L.MAT-091. May not be taken for credit if a grade of C or higher was achieved in MAT-117 or a higher level mathematics course. 3 credits.

L.MAT-115: Statistics-FM
Basic statistical concepts and methods. Descriptive statistics and probability, distribution and sampling theory, hypothesis testing and analysis of variance, correlation and regression. Prerequisite: Three years of high school Mathematics including one year of Algebra II or a grade of C- or better in L.MAT-091. 4 credits.

L.MAT-117: Pre-Calculus-FM
This course provides a one semester preparation for Calculus while presenting an introduction to mathematical modeling. Topics include: linear, quadratic, exponential, and trigonometric models. Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics or permission of the instructor or L.MAT-113. 4 credits.

L.MAT-124: Finite Mathematics: A Modeling Approach-FM
Mathematics of linear and probabilistic models that assist in decision-making processes. Topics include linear programming and probability. Prerequisites: Four years of high school mathematics, or a grade of C- or better in L.MAT-113, or permission of instructor. 4 credits.

L.MAT-150: Calculus of One Variable I-FM
A study of the basic concepts and techniques of analytic geometry, differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable, and applications to calculus based models. Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency in L.MAT-113 and 117 or equivalent or superior high school mathematics background. May not be taken for credit if credit has previously been received for L.MAT-170. 4 credits.

L.MAT-160: Calculus of One Variable II
Further study of the integral calculus of functions of one variable and an introduction to sequences, series, and differential equations. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 or equivalent. May not be taken for credit if credit has previously been received for L.MAT-170. 4 credits.

L.MAT-170: Accelerated Calculus of One Variable-FM
A course for students who have had one year of calculus in high school and are familiar with the computational aspects of the subject. Topics include functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, sequences, series, an introduction to differential equations, and an introduction to the modeling process. Upon completion of this course, students are prepared for Calculus III (L.MAT-260). Prerequisite: One year of high school calculus or permission of instructor. May not be taken for credit if credit has previously been received for L.MAT-150 or L.MAT-160. 4 credits.

L.MAT-220: Introduction to Probability & Statistics
A study of the fundamental techniques used in descriptive statistics as applied to real-world data and the processes associated with the design and analysis of experiments; application of theories from Calculus to the construction of cumulative distributions for continuous random variables and computation of associated probabilities, expected values and variances. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 or 170. 3 credits.

L.MAT-230: Discrete Mathematics
This course introduces the ideas and methods of logic and proofs. Topics include: set theory, logic, functions, proof types and elementary number theory. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 and one of either L.MAT-160 or L.CIT-115 can be taken as a co-requisite, or L.MAT-170. 3 credits.

L.MAT-250: Linear Algebra
A course which introduces abstract vector spaces, matrices and linear transformations. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 or L.MAT-170, or permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

L.MAT-260: Analytic Geometry & Calculus III
A study of partial differentiation and multiple integration, elementary vector analysis and applications of these concepts.. Prerequisite: L.MAT-160 or 170. 4 credits.

L.MAT-310: Ordinary Differential Equations
Theory, solution and applications of ordinary differential equations including Laplace transform methods. Prerequisite: L.MAT-160 or MAT-170. 3 credits.

L.MAT-370: Numerical Analysis
A study of some of the standard numerical algorithms used to solve real-world problems arising in engineering and the sciences, and use of a computer to implement these algorithms; pitfalls in computation, error analysis, solving linear systems, interpolation and approximation. Applies to a major in Mathematics or Computer Science, but not both. Prerequisites: L.MAT-160 or 170 and L.CIT-115. 3 credits.

L.MAT-380: Modern Geometry
Both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries are studied from an axiomatic viewpoint. Traditional high school geometry concepts are presented in a rigorous fashion so as to expand one's depth of understanding of traditional geometry. Prerequisite: L.MAT-230 or permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

L.MAT-390: Mathematics Seminar
A course where students experience and learn mathematics beyond that contained in usual coursework. Participants carry out research in an area of mathematics of interest to them with a faculty mentor. Each student gives at least one presentation on their topic and make definite progress toward the completion of the senior paper and presentation. Prerequisite: L.MAT-260, and 230; L.MAT-250 can be taken as a co-requisite. 1 credit (may be repeated).

L.MAT-391: Guided Research
A course where students experience and learn mathematics beyond that contained in usual coursework. Participants carry out research in an area of mathematics in a small group. Groups will give presentations and submit a final artifact. Prerequisite: L.MAT-230, L.MAT-250, and L.MAT-260. 3 credits.

L.MAT-450: Modern Algebra
A course which covers basic ideas on groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and polynomials over a field. Prerequisite: L.MAT- 230, and L.MAT-250 can be taken as a co-requisite or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

L.MAT-460: Real Analysis
Further work in Calculus, including the properties of the real number system, limits and continuity, differentiation and integration, sequences and series. Prerequisite: L.MAT-160 or 170, and L.MAT-230; L.MAT-250 can be taken as a co-requisite or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

L.MAT-490: Math Portfolio-PJ
Students will assemble a portfolio that provides evidence of appreciable growth in their understanding of mathematics, and reflect on the relevance of the Loras College Dispositions and lifelong learning skills to their development in the major and as a person. This course satisfies the General Education Portfolio requirement. Prerequisite: Declared Mathematics major, completion of three of the five advanced general education courses, L.MAT-230, 250, and 260, L.MAT-391 or at least two semesters of L.MAT-390. 1 credit.

L.MAT-495: Topics in Mathematics
Selected topics of current interest to students. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credits arranged.

MUSIc


L.MUS-100: Soundscapes
This course offers its participants a unique opportunity to examine and expand their understanding and definitions of music on both personal and communal levels. Music is both science and art: a measurable, explainable phenomenon, and a creative and expressive experience, existing in diverse communal configurations. An enlarged appreciation of the intersection of sound, the acoustical components of music, setting ("the who" and "the where") which shapes the sound, and significance (what does this sound "mean"), invites a lively and deeper listening, one that is beyond mere hearing. Students will explore selected musical compositions and attend "live" concert venues, and create their own "composition". Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.MUS-101: Music Theory I
This course offers an integrated presentation of the fundamental materials of music, including but not limited to ear-training, sight-singing, harmony, chord recognition and analysis, musical forms, elementary orchestration and beginning composition. Prerequisite: basic music notation literacy. Prerequisite for L.MUS-102: L.MUS-101. 3 credits.

L.MUS-102: Music Theory II
This course offers an integrated presentation of the fundamental materials of music, including but not limited to ear-training, sight-singing, harmony, chord recognition and analysis, musical forms, elementary orchestration and beginning composition. Prerequisite: basic music notation literacy. Prerequisite for L.MUS-102: L.MUS-101. 3 credits.

L.MUS-110: Voice               
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-121: Piano
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-122: Organ
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-123: Harpsichord
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-131: Violin
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-132: Viola
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-133: Cello
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-134: String Bass
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-135: Guitar
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-141: Flute
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-142: Oboe
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-143: Clarinet
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-144: Saxophone
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-145: Bassoon
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-151: Trumpet
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-152: French Horn
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-153: Trombone
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-154: Baritone
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-160: Percussion
Applied Music course. Audition required. 0.5 or 1 credit.

L.MUS-174: String Techniques
Skills and materials are stressed to organize and teach string instruments in the schools. 1 credit.

L.MUS-175: Woodwind Techniques
Skills and materials are stressed to organize and teach woodwind instruments in the schools.1 credit.

L.MUS-176: Brass Techniques
Skills and materials are stressed to organize and teach brass instruments in the schools. 1 credit.

L.MUS-177: Percussion Techniques
Skills and materials are stressed to organize and teach percussion in the schools. 1 credit.

L.MUS-178: Foreign Language Diction
2 credits.

L.MUS-179: Vocal Pedagogy
2 credits.

L.MUS-181: Loras Wind Ensemble
Prerequisite: Audition, permission. 1 credit. All semesters.

L.MUS-182: Loras Jazz Ensemble
Prerequisite: Audition, permission. 1 credit. All semesters.

L.MUS-183: Loras Concert Choir
Prerequisite: Audition, permission. 1 credit. All semesters.

L.MUS-184: Loras Chamber Singers
Prerequisites: Audition, permission; concurrent participation in L.MUS-183. 1 credit. All semesters.

L.MUS-185: Bella Voce (Women’s Choir)
Prerequisite: Audition, permission. 1 credit. All semesters.

L.MUS-186: Con Brio (Men’s Choir)
Prerequisite: Audition, permission. 1 credit. All semesters.

L.MUS-188: Chamber Ensembles
Prerequisite: Audition, permission. 1 credit. All semesters.

L.MUS-189: The Jazz Experience
The Loras Jazz Experience will be a study/travel course that focuses on the performance of jazz styles in both instrumental and vocal music. The students will spend the first week of the course on campus learning several jazz styles through intensive rehearsals and listening episodes. The following weeks will be spent traveling throughout the Midwest and giving Jazz performances at malls, nursing homes, schools, and other venues. Styles studied will include Swing, Salsa, Big Band, Bossa Nova, Latin, Rock, and others. A variety of both instrumental and vocal selections will be rehearsed and performed. When possible, local musicians from the various destinations will be included. This could be in the form of guest soloists, guest directors, shared concerts, or dance options. 3 credits. January term.

L.MUS-203: Music Theory III
A continuation of L.MUS-101, 102, with further development of the involved material. Prerequisite for L.MUS-203: L.MUS-101 or 102; prerequisite for L.MUS-204: L.MUS-203. 3 credits.

L.MUS-204: Music Theory IV
A continuation of L.MUS-101, 102, with further development of the involved material. Prerequisite for L.MUS-203: L.MUS-101 or 102; prerequisite for L.MUS-204: L.MUS-203. 3 credits.

L.MUS-215: History & Literature of Music I
Evaluation of forms, styles, media, political, social and philosophical considerations. Listening and analysis. Prerequisite: L.MUS-102. 3 credits.

L.MUS-216: History & Literature of Music II
Evaluation of forms, styles, media, political, social and philosophical considerations. Listening and analysis. Prerequisites: L.MUS-102 and L.MUS-215 (or equivalent). 3 credits.

L.MUS-219: Music & Being Human-AA
Music deepens our understanding of what it means to be fully human. This survey course is designed to explore music as both science and art, and to nurture and develop the student’s critical listening skills through live and recorded exposure to a wide range of musical examples from a diversity of time periods and geographical/cultural settings. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits
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L.MUS-230: Basic Conducting
Basic techniques and principles of conducting. Prerequisite: L.MUS-102. 2 credits.

L.MUS-233: Curriculum and Instruction in Music K-6
Goals, content, materials, and teaching strategies and basic music skills for planning and implementing music experiences in the music classroom are primary components in this course. Creative activities and experiments that promote music across the curriculum are included. Lesson planning for musical content area is also expected. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. 2-3 credits.

L.MUS-252: Music Appreciation-AA
Music appreciation will present the music of Western Culture in the context of social history. A variety of styles and genres are explored and related to the historical context of the studies period. Style periods explored will be selected from antiquity through the contemporary periods. Prerequisites: L.LIB-110, L.IB-105, L.LIB-110, and one of the following L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135 or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.MUS-295: Topics
Music topics course. Used to develop courses which have not been approved under another catalog number. See Division Chair for more information.

L.MUS-309: Orchestration
The basic technique of arranging music for instrumental and vocal ensembles. Prerequisite: L.MUS-204 or equivalent. 2 credits.

L.MUS-315: History & Literature of Music III
Continuation of MUS-215 (216). Prerequisites: L.MUS-102 and L.MUS-215 (or equivalents). 3 credits.

L.MUS-318: History of Musical Theatre-AA
Students will explore the history and development of musical theatre by visiting the neon lights on Broadway. From the classroom in Dubuque to the theatres of New York, the course will examine the history and development of musical theatre as an American art form. Students will be introduced to the unique sights, smells and sounds of nearly 200 years of social, political and cultural interpretation as represented by the Broadway musical. Students will pay homage to historical sites and the ways New York and Broadway entertainment have both interpreted and changed the fabric of American culture. Students will also study great composers and then actually see the reflections, interpretations and imitations of the talented and colorful musical theatre greats such as Ziegfeld, Gershwin, Rogers and Hammerstein, Cole Porter, and Sondheim. Additionally, students will discover what it has taken for musical theatre to thrive through strategic partnerships, grassroots campaigning and the sense of community cultivated by New York’s public spaces full of advertising and marketing campaigns selling culture. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

L.MUS-321: History of Sacred Music-AA
Music of the Western church has had a profound influence on the development of Western Classical music. Specifically, how that music should be crafted and presented in worship has been a topic of debate throughout time. This course will provide a general survey of the development of Christian church music throughout the centuries and delve into issues surrounding music and worship. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110,and L.LIB-130 or L.LIB-135. 3 credits. January term.

L.MUS-333: Instrumental Conducting
Continuation of materials in L.MUS-330 designed for instrumental conducting students. With an emphasis on score reading and instrumental materials, this course is designed to develop effective conducting techniques and planning and organizational skills basic to teaching instrumental music at the secondary level. Prerequisite: L.MUS-230. 2 credits.

L.MUS-336: Choral Conducting
To develop a conducting technique basic to teaching music at the secondary level and to study and prepare scores from the main periods of music history. To learn how to plan, organize and coordinate high school choral groups. 2 credits.

L.MUS-337: Secondary Music Methods
Materials and methods appropriate for general music classes as well as choral and instrumental organizations on the junior and senior high school levels are presented. 3 credits.

L.MUS-350: Music in the Movies-AA
Each of you comes to this class with a different set of needs, enthusiasms and expectations. Through design, discussion and improvisation, this course will meet as many of those needs as possible. Since most members of this class will have a life-long relationship with movie music, knowing more about the composers, processes, techniques, etc. should prove interesting and useful. Film music is a wonderful way not only to encounter some of the most charming, moving, and innovative musical compositions of the 20th and 21st centuries, but also a way to come to a greater understanding of the American character. This course will use a variety of pedagogies to study the subject, including film clips, discussions, readings, and quizzes. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. January term.

NEUROSCIENCE


L.NEU-145: Introductory Neuroscience
This course will introduce students to the fundamental topics and concepts that are critical to understanding the biological and psychological components of Neuroscience. Topics to be covered include the biochemistry of action potentials, the functioning of ion channels, a brief overview of systems neuroscience (vision, audition, etc.), neurotransmitters and peripheral endocrine systems, learning and memory, the effects of neurotransmitters on behavior, the biology underlying several psychiatric disorders, and basic neuroanatomy. Prerequisites: L.BIO-115 or L.PSY-101. 3 credits.

L.NEU-281: Exploring the Brain through Traumatic Brain Injury
It is difficult to fully understand how the brain functions under completely normal working conditions. One technique used to investigate brain functioning through clinical cases where there has been trauma in a specified region of the brain. Thus, in people with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) neuroscientists can locate the region of trauma and any change in functioning of the individual. This course is designed to explore the brain through various historical cases and provide a deeper understanding of neuro-functioning from resulting deficits in dissociated brain regions. Clinical cases will be provided as we travel from the frontal lobe to the temporal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe and beyond. Prerequisite: L.NEU-145 or L.BIO-345. 3 credits.

L.NEU-311: Hormones and Behavior
This course will introduce students to several topics within the field of neuroendocrinology.  Topics to be discussed will include the blood brain barrier, synthesis and release of neurotransmitters relevant to behavior, psychosomatic interactions, and the effects of various monoamine, peptide, and steroid hormones on sexual, reproductive, affiliative, aggressive, parental, and reward-seeking behaviors.  In addition to readings from the text, students will read and discuss primary literature sources from work with both human and non-human models.  Laboratory work will teach students several research skills and laboratory techniques including study design, behavioral observation and scoring, blood sampling, processing and storage,
and data set management.

L.NEU-395: Special Topics
Neuroscience course. Neuroscience is the scientific study of the nervous system. 3 credits.

L.NEU-489: Senior Seminar
Neuroscience course. Neuroscience is the scientific study of the nervous system. 1 credit.

PHILOSOPHY


L.PHI-101: Critical Reasoning: Principles and Applications
Critical reasoning may be defined as “the careful and deliberate determination of whether to accept, reject, or suspend judgment about a claim.” To this end, critical reasoning develops one’s ability to evaluate one’s own, as well as others’, arguments for or against a claim, primarily through detecting formal and informal fallacies, locating unwarranted descriptive and value assumptions, assessing various forms of evidence, and recognizing significant, missing information in an argument. 3 credits.

L.PHI-110: Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to philosophy, its nature, methodology, principal themes, questions, disagreements, and prominent philosophers, as represented in each of the four major philosophic periods: ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary. 3 credits.

L.PHI-220: Ancient Philosophy
A survey of Western philosophy in ancient Greek and Roman cultures. Central issues include: integration of poetic and mythic worldviews with critical thought; themes of “one and the many” and “part and whole” amid material and immaterial existence; determination, freedom, chance, and fate; the inclination toward human happiness; cognitive access to “reality” and the acts of opinion, belief, and knowledge. L.PHI-101 or L.PHI-110 strongly recommended, but not required. 3 credits.

L.PHI-221: Medieval Philosophy
A survey of Christian, Jewish and Islamic philosophy from the early middle ages through Renaissance scholasticism, with particular attention to the work of Thomas Aquinas. Either L.PHI-101 or L.PHI-110 strongly recommended, but not required. 3 credits.

L.PHI-222: Modern Philosophy
Survey of philosophical thought during the 17th and 18th centuries, noting emphases upon methodology, mathematics, science, and progress by Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. These thinkers continue to influence present attitudes toward the starting point and structure of knowledge, the possibility of metaphysics, the relation of the world to God, and our own human composition, freedom, and destiny. Either L.PHI-101 or L.PHI-110 strongly recommended, but not required. 3 credits.

L.PHI-223: Contemporary Philosophy
An examination of the principal views of God, humanity, and the world as advanced by major contemporary philosophers and philosophical movements, including existentialism and phenomenology, American pragmatic and instrumentalist philosophy, analytic and positivist philosophy, dialectical thought. Either L.PHI-101 or L.PHI-110 strongly recommended, but not required. 3 credits.

L.PHI-225: Art, Beauty & Meaning
This course explores the nature of art, the meaning of beauty, and the relationship between the two by consulting selected writings and by directly experiencing and studying specific works of art (and, in some cases, by interacting with the artists who produced them). Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.PHI-250: Human Identity in Community-AI
Philosophic investigation into human identity as rational and social being, relying upon common experience, culture, and selected findings of the natural, social, and behavioral sciences; attention given to the distinct powers, performances, and place of human beings within the natural order, and insights related to the self and society, including the themes of life, mutual dependence, freedom, unity, knowledge and practical reason, and the afterlife. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and either L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-278: Bioethics, Society & Culture
Abortion, assisted reproductive technologies, death and dying, research on human subjects, stem cell research, organ transplants, allocation of resources in a pandemic, and health care for the poor are examined through the lenses of philosophical ethics, Catholic moral theology, and law and public policy. Students will interact with health care professionals and institutions and advocacy groups, discuss contemporary films, and assess Internet web sites. May not enroll if have taken L.PHI-319 Bioethics-AV. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.PHI-280: Eastern Philosophy
A discussion of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism as autonomous philosophic and spiritual traditions and as they relate to Western philosophic and spiritual traditions. Either L.PHI-101 or L.PHI-110 strongly recommended, but not required. 3 credits.

L.PHI-290: Christianity, Film & The Arts-AA
An exploration of manifestations of Christianity in film and the arts (painting, sculpture, stained glass, music, architecture) in various time periods and cultures. The concepts of philosophical aesthetics are used to understand, analyze, and evaluate the films and works of art. Classes include opportunities to experience various works of art and view film as well as area field trips. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-301: Foundational Ethics
An examination of various ethical theories with reading of important historical and contemporary primary source texts. Particular attention is given to natural law ethics. 3 credits.

L.PHI-311: Business Ethics-AV
This course studies basic moral principles and theories as they apply in the evaluation of the moral issues that arise in the three basic kinds of business relationships: between the employee and the firm, between the firm and other economic agents, and between the firm and various non-business groups. 3 credits. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-313: Environmental Ethics-AV
This course studies basic moral principles and theories as they apply in the evaluation of the moral issues that arise when human beings, both individually and collectively, interact with the environment, particularly in the areas of pollution and resource depletion. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-314: Computers, Ethics & Society-AV
This course studies basic moral principles and theories as they apply in the evaluation of the moral issues that arise from the use of information and computer technology (e.g., acquisition and collection of information, intellectual property, information access and stewardship, security, the social impact of computer technology). Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-315: Communication Ethics-AV
This course studies basic moral principles and theories as they apply in the evaluation of the moral issues that arise in media communications (e.g., truth, privacy, confidentiality, conflicts of interests, antisocial behavior, morally offensive content, responsibility to juveniles, social justice, stereotypes). Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-316: Ethics in Philosophy, Literature & Film-AV
An introduction to ethical theory through discussion of contemporary personal and social moral problems. Ethical theories and problems are explored through philosophical and literary writings and film. Clustered with ENG 241: Literature for Ethical Reflection. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-317: Ethics and the New Genetics-AV
A multidisciplinary, team-taught course examining the ethical, legal, and social implications of contemporary work in the field of genetics. Topics include genetic testing and screening, reproductive decision-making. behavioral genetics, genetic engineering, eugenics, genetic discrimination, gene patenting, and the use of DNA evidence in court. Clustered with BIO 273: Human Genetics. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PHI-318: The Theory and Practice of Bioethics-AV
This course combines philosophical and theological study of standard topics in bioethics (e.g., reproductive decisions, death and dying, research and experimentation, allocation of scarce resources) with examination of the use of bioethics in health care facilities and in formulating public policies. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.PHI-319: Bioethics-AV
A multidisciplinary survey of current issues in bioethics from philosophical, religious, and legal perspectives. Topics include assisted reproductive technologies, sex selection, reproductive decision-making and genetic disorders, abortion, life-sustaining treatments, euthanasia and assisted suicide, medical research, and access to health care services. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, L.LIB-220. May not enroll if have taken L.PHI-278: Bioethics, Society and Culture. 3 credits.

L.PHI-331: Knowledge, Truth & Reality
The study of what and how things exist in the world (metaphysics/philosophy of being), and how we cognitively experience and understand these things (epistemology/philosophy of knowledge); includes notions of being in itself, potency and actuality; causality; the properties of unity, good, and beauty; the nature of evil; intellect and sense perception; truth and falsity; and subjective states of certainty, doubt, ignorance, and error. Prerequisite: Either L.PHI-101 or L.PHI-110; at least one historical sequence course recommended but not required. 3 credits.

L.PHI-333: Philosophy of God & Religion
An examination of attempts to justify belief in the existence of God, the divine nature and attributes, the problem of evil, religious experience, the status of religious language, and divine action in the world, using historical, contemporary, and multicultural sources. Prerequisite: Either L.PHI-101 or L.PHI-110. At least one of the historical sequence courses strongly recommended but not required. 3 credits.

L.PHI-348: Philosophy of Science
Examination of basic problems about the nature, goals, and methods of scientific inquiry in contrast to philosophy; analysis of scientific theories in terms of the role of mathematics, observation, causality, and demonstration; and examination of the contrast between natural and social sciences. 3 credits.

L.PHI-375: Comparative Philosophy
An interpretive study of selected Eastern and Western philosophical perspectives on such issues as the person, self, individuality, consciousness, experience, knowledge, nature, ultimate reality, and their implications for philosophy (especially ethics) and religion with the aim of exploring both the wealth of diversity in, and possible parallels and convergences among, these distinct traditions. 3 credits.

L.PHI-376: Philosophy & the Rise of Christianity-AC
J-term study travel course traces Christian thought and new syntheses in regions where love for wisdom has not been left in ruins. Initial classes meet at Loras to engage primary texts; then travel to Sicily and Rome. Themes include: soul, body and the person; love and the will; women’s and men’s roles in political society; moral systems and virtue; God’s providence and power. Prerequisites: L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110; also recommended: L.PHI-100 and/or L.PHI-220, or one other philosophy or Catholic theology course. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.PHI-475: Philosophical Foundations of Theology
An examination of the principal texts, issues, and concepts of Western philosophy, Ancient through Contemporary periods, which have entered into Christian theological discourse. Prerequisite: participation in undergraduate seminary program, pre-theology program or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

PHYSICS


L.PHY-207: Powerful Ideas in Physical Science-AH
This course develops a conceptual understanding of physical science through the examination of everyday phenomena, with an emphasis on the search for and use of evidence to provide the basis for drawing scientific conclusions. Conceptual models are created to explain electric circuits, capacitors, electric charge, light, color mixing, heat and temperature, and conservation of energy. Prerequisites: Completion of L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110 and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits
.
L.PHY-208: Astronomy-AH
This course engages students in an exploration of the utility of scientific models in interpreting the vast complexity in the observable universe. The scientific models are developed through student-centered observations and explorations. The objectives of this course are to promote quantitative as well as qualitative skills in the study of celestial observations and motions, the analysis of astrophysical spectra, comparative planetary geology, and the structure of stars and galaxies as well as their genesis and evolution. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course. 4 credits.

L.PHY-210: Elements of Physics I
Introductory, algebra-based physics that satisfies requirements for programs in the life sciences, sport science and health care professions. Topics include mechanics, sound, and heat. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: L.MAT-117 or higher. 4 credits.

L.PHY-211: Elements of Physics II
A continuation of L.PHY-210.Introductory, algebra-based physics that satisfies requirements for programs in the life sciences, sport science and health care professions. Topics include electricity, magnetism, optics, as well as introductory quantum, atomic and nuclear physics. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: L.PHY-210 or equivalent. 4 credits.

L.PHY-223: Physics for Scientists & Engineers I
Introductory calculus-based physics that satisfies requirements for programs in the mathematical, engineering, chemical and physical sciences. Topics include mechanics, heat, sound. Four class periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: L.MAT-150 (co-requisite optional), L.MAT-160 or L.MAT-170. Corequisite: L.PHY-290. 5 credits.

L.PHY-224: Physics for Scientists & Engineers II
A continuation of L.PHY-223.Introductory calculus-based physics that satisfies requirements for programs in the mathematical, engineering, chemical and physical sciences. Topics include electricity, magnetism, optics as well as introductory quantum, atomic and nuclear physics. Prerequisites: L.PHY-223; L.MAT-160, L.MAT-170, or L.MAT-260. Corequisite: L.PHY-291. Four class periods and one three-hour laboratory period per week. 5 credits.

L.PHY-290: Physics Lab I
Three hour laboratory course to accompany L.PHY-210 and L.PHY-223. Students work in groups to conduct experiments designed to help understanding of lecture material. Must be taken with concurrently with the lecture class. Corequisite: L.PHY-210 or L.PHY-223. 0 credits.

L.PHY-291: Physics Lab II
Three hour laboratory course to accompany L.PHY-211 and L.PHY-224. Students work in groups to conduct experiments designed to help understanding of lecture material. Must be taken with concurrently with the lecture class. Corequisite: L.PHY-211 or L.PHY-224. 0 credits.

L.PHY-331: Modern Physics
A discussion of the modern knowledge of the nature and properties of electrons, photons, atoms and molecules. Topics include the fundamental experiments of quantum physics, atomic spectra and structure, special relativity, and an introduction to quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: L.PHY-224 and L.MAT-260. 3 credits.

POLITICS


L.POL-101: Issues in American Politics
This course is a basic introduction to the primary features of the American political system, examining such things as the Constitution, elections, public opinion, parties and interest groups, the media, Congress, the presidency, the courts, and civil rights and liberties. Woven throughout the course is an exploration of some of the most pressing issues in contemporary American politics. 3 credits.

L.POL-121: Issues in Global Politics
This course introduces the major problems confronting the international community and that community’s efforts to address them. The focus is on common global issues such as globalization, nationalism, human rights, war, economic development, poverty, the status of women, and the environment. 3 credits.

L.POL-131: Foundations of Western Political Thought
This course examines the history of political thought in the West by drawing on an analysis of original texts from Plato through the 20th century with particular attention to how different thinkers have addressed the same kinds of perennial questions about political life in radically different ways. 3 credits.

L.POL-201: Campaigns & Elections
This course examines the nature of political campaigns and elections in the United States, with particular attention to presidential and Congressional elections. 3 credits.

L.POL-202: Congress & the Presidency
This course examines the structure and power of the two branches of government and the relationship between them. It pays particular attention to the constitutional, institutional, partisan, and personal bases for cooperation and conflict between the two, as well as their interactions in a number of policy fields. 3 credits.

L.POL-203: The Road to the White House
This January term course provides students the opportunity to both study and participate in the Iowa caucuses. Students will examine the issues, voters, interest groups, campaigns, and candidates. Through direct observation of the campaigns and candidates and the collection of campaign artifacts students will analyze political tactics and decisions, as well as the electorate. As part of the course students will choose what party to caucus with and ultimately which presidential candidate they support by caucusing for that candidate on election night. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.POL-211: Comparative Politics
This course introduces issues and concepts in comparative politics, such as power, authority, legitimacy, the state and sovereignty. It offers an in-depth comparison of the features and performances of democratic, authoritarian, and totalitarian political regimes including countries as case studies for each type of regime. 3 credits.

L.POL-221: International Politics
The course examines the origins and evolution of the modern international system with a focus on nationalism, violent conflict, diplomacy, international organizations and law, global political economy, and emerging issues and patterns in the post-Cold War period. It integrates theoretical perspectives with current issues. 3 credits.

L.POL-232: American Political Thought
This course examines the historical development of political thought in the United States by drawing on an analysis of original texts from the nation’s founding through the present. 3 credits.

L.POL-233: Jurisprudence
This course examines the theoretical concepts – both normative and empirical – related to the study of law. It draws on original texts from major legal theorists and the primary schools of legal thought. Prerequisite: L.POL-101. 3 credits.

L.POL-241: Political & Social Themes in Film
This course examines the ways in which films convey political and social meanings. It draws on both historical and contemporary, as well as international and American, films. 3 credits.

L.POL-301: Constitutional Law: Federal Powers
This course examines the structure and powers of the Supreme Court and its role in determining the constitutionally appropriate roles, relations, and powers of institutions within the American political system. Most of the course relies on an analysis of Supreme Court decisions in the areas of judicial review, federalism, congressional and presidential powers, property rights and economic regulation. 3 credits.

L.POL-302: Constitutional Law: Civil Rights & Liberties
This course examines the Supreme Court’s role in defining the scope and content of civil rights and liberties in the United States through an analysis of cases in the areas of due process and criminal procedure, privacy, freedom of speech and of the press, religious liberty and the equal protection of the laws. L.POL-301 is not a prerequisite for this course. 3 credits.

L.POL-303: Supreme Court Watch
This course is taught annually during the summer to coincide with the end of each Supreme Court term. It examines the major cases and their precedents that the Court decided that year. 3 credits.

L.POL-304: Identity Politics in America
This course examines the role of factors such as race, ethnicity, religion, and gender in American political life. 3 credits.

L.POL-308: American Public Policy
This course examines public policy in the United States. We will learn about the process of policy formation, implementation, and assessment. We will explore the primary areas of domestic policy, such as taxation, social welfare, healthcare, civil rights, energy, crime, education, and immigration. Finally, we will consider the moral and ethical dimensions of policy-making in these areas. 3 credits.

L.POL-312: Latin American Politics & Society
This course examines Latin American politics with an emphasis on the historical, economic and cultural features that shape its contemporary politics. It includes attention to the state, political parties, the military, and social groups and classes, as well as dynamics of social and political change, including military coups, revolutions and social movements. 3 credits.

L.POL-313: Middle Eastern Politics & Society
This course examines the politics and society of the Middle East and North Africa, particularly how its history, economy, geography, culture, religion and regional conflicts shape its contemporary politics. The relationship between Islam and the state is of particular concern. 3 credits.

L.POL-314: Politics in the Developing World
This course examines the nature and fundamental features of politics in the developing world. It includes investigation of historical, socioeconomic, and cultural influences on politics, as well as the effects of forces such as social change, international political economy and issues such as poverty and debt. 3 credits.

L.POL-315: European Politics
This course examines the politics of Europe, including struggles over economics, immigration and culture. It also explores the challenges of building the European Union and defining its role in the world. 3 credits.

L.POL-321: War and Pacifism-AV
This course uses a wide variety of original writings to examine the nature and causes of war, theories of the just war, the pacifist critique of war, and the practice of nonviolence as an alternative to war. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.POL-322: American Foreign Policy
This course examines the historical patterns and contemporary factors shaping American foreign policy. It pays particular attention to issues in the post-Cold War period. The course considers the social and cultural foundations of American foreign policy, as well as the role of institutions such as the White House, the National Security Council, other executive branch departments, and Congress in the policy-making process. 3 credits.

L.POL-331: Political Thought & Contemporary Social Issues
This course examines the relationship between philosophical principles like justice, rights, duty, equality, liberty, and democracy and current social and political issues in which they find concrete expression. The selection of principles and issues under examination will vary from semester to semester. 3 credits.

L.POL-351: Comparative Environmental Politics-AC
This course will examine how culture, broadly defined, affects the formation and execution of policies on global warming. Students will study historical legacies and philosophical traditions underpinning the modern environmental movement, the interaction of competing economic, social and political interests, and the effects of political institutions in channeling policy responses. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-220, L.LIB-130, or L.LIB-135. 3 credits.

L.POL-394: Internship
Recognizing the value of learning about politics through personal experience, students can earn up to nine credits for satisfactory completion of supervised internships. These can include government offices, congressional staffs, political parties, election campaigns, law offices, non-profit organizations, and other relevant groups. Proposals and credits are arranged in consultation with faculty members in the program. Internship credits cannot substitute for specified major requirements. Each semester and summer session. 1-9 credits.

L.POL-395: Topics
Includes occasional courses on specific topics or contemporary issues. 3 credits.

L.POL-489: Senior Seminar
This course is the required seminar for senior majors which attempts to clarify the student’s knowledge and appreciation of the discipline in a culminating or capstone fashion, concentrating on theoretical and substantive issues in the field. It may be individually or team taught in the program. 3 credits.

PSYCHOLOGY

L.PSY-101: Introductory Psychology
An introduction to the science and practice of psychology as a discipline within the liberal arts. All sections will include an overview and brief history of psychology, basic research methods and statistics, physiological psychology, and human development. Each section will also include three or more of the following topics: learning and/or cognition; social psychology and/or motivation-emotion; abnormal psychology and/or clinical-counseling psychology. 3 credits.

L.PSY-121: Developmental Psychology
A study of human development across the life-span, with emphasis on the factors influencing physical, cognitive, and emotional development. 3 credits.

L.PSY-131: Psychology of Stress
This course will introduce students to theories and principles related to the sources and effects of stress. Students will learn about different sources of stress and anxiety and how physiological systems are affected by stress. As part of the course, all students will spend one weekend off campus on a two-day silent retreat and will attend presentations outside of the regularly scheduled class times. There will be an additional course fee to cover costs of the retreat and special instructors. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.PSY-190: The Working Poor
Through a hands-on simulation, readings, class discussions, guest speakers, and media presentations, students will gain a foundational knowledge of the history of the working poor in the U.S., the theories regarding causation and reduction, and the grassroots efforts for change as they relate to the social class referred to as the working poor. Students will build on this foundation by developing a specific knowledge of the working poor in the Dubuque community. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.PSY-211: Research Methods & Statistics I
An introduction to the use of research strategies and tools of measurement in psychology. The SPSS computer program will be used to introduce basic data handling, descriptive and correlational statistics. Students will be expected to participate in elementary research studies, produce APA style research papers, and evaluate research literature. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in the mathematical modeling requirement, L.PSY-101 or equivalent. 4 credits.

L.PSY-212: Research Methods & Statistics II
This course continues instruction in psychological research by reviewing the basics of the scientific method, ethics, and APA style. Experimental research will then be introduced, along with more advanced inferential statistics. More complex designs, such as meta-analysis and factor analysis will be discussed. Students will again be expected to participate in elementary research studies, produce APA style research papers, and evaluate research literature. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101 or equivalent and L.PSY-211 (with C- or better). 4 credits.

L.PSY-221: Abnormal Psychology
An examination of mental disorder in terms of etiology and therapy. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101 or 121; and sophomore standing. 3 credits.

L.PSY-224: Applied Social Psychology-AI
Are social forces affecting your individual decisions? Can one person change an entire community? This course will apply theories and research in social psychology to the examination of these questions. Students will reflect on their personal social experiences, discuss literature written about individual struggles with society, and explore ways to effect positive social change in their communities. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PSY-225: Personality-AI
Introduction to Personality examines the life-long interaction between individual and environment in the forming and periodic reforming of one's personality. Age-related tasks central to the development of a healthy personality will be highlighted. The interaction among the biological, the psychological, and the socio-cultural will be emphasized in describing and explaining personality. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PSY-227: Culture & Psychopathology-AC
The course material considers mental illness categories in light of the influence of culture on the diagnosis, course and prognosis Foundational concepts include a consideration of mind/body dualism, the concepts of self and the phenomenon on resilience. The foundational concepts provide a cultural lens for understanding the broader culture of “mental illness” as it occurs around the world. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PSY-231: Sensation & Perception
A study of the physiological mechanisms that are responsible for how our sensory systems operate and how we use these sensory systems to organize perceptions of reality. The emphasis of this class is on the conversion of external stimuli into neural activity. Topics include understanding visual, cutaneous, and auditory processing. Lab included. Prerequisite: L.PSY-101. 3 credits.

L.PSY-242: Industrial-Organizational Behavior
A survey of how psychology principles may be applied to the behavior of people at work. Topics covered include job analysis, selection, performance appraisal, training, work motivation, work teams, leadership and organizational development. Prerequisite: L.PSY-101. Recommended: L.PSY-211 or L.BUS-250. 3 credits.

L.PSY-244: Social Psychology
Social psychology is a subfield of psychology focused on how people interact, influence one another, and make judgments about others. This course is designed to be an introduction to the scientific study of social psychology, primarily for psychology majors or minors. Prerequisite: L.PSY-101. 3 credits.

L.PSY-252: Positive Psychology-AI
Students will examine a variety of human strengths such as love, empathy, and happiness and will explore the factors that influence each strength’s development and expression in their lives. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.PSY-265: Psychology As A Profession
This course is designed to help students explore career options with a psychology major. Students also develop a professional resume and learn about the wealth of resources available to make good career and professional decisions as their academic career progresses. Prerequisite: L.PSY-101 or L.PSY-121. 1 credit.

L.PSY-267: Psychology & the Arts-AA
In this course, students will explore how art is perceived, created, and used. Students will study perception, cultural differences, personality and creativity, and art as therapy. There will be activities designed to enhance creativity. Artistic experience is not required! Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PSY-277: Cross-Cultural Psychology
This course will utilize theories and concepts from cross-cultural psychology and intercultural communication to take an in-depth look at culture in general and at a variety of micro-cultures, including gender, social class and popular culture. Students will read an assortment of writings focused on cultural diversity and current issues regarding specific cultural groups. 3 credits.

L.PSY-285: Drugs & Human Behavior-AH
This is a course about drugs that alter mood, thought processes and behavior by influencing the functioning of nerve cells (neurons). Students will not need an extensive background in biology, chemistry or psychology to master the material covered in this class. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and a Mathematical Modeling (-FM) course and a college level introductory course in at least one of the following: Biology, Chemistry, Psychology. 3 credits.

L.PSY-323: Psychology of Adulthood & Aging-AI
A survey of modern knowledge about the processes of becoming old (aging) and old age itself. Emphasis is placed on cognitive processes, personality, and mental health. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.PSY-331: Physiological Psychology
Basics of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with applications in genetics, motivation, emotion, movement, sleep, sensory processes, and mental disorders and their treatment. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101. Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor required. 3 credits.

L.PSY-332: Learning & Cognition
An overview of how people learn, acquire and use knowledge. Course examines mental processes to include: learning, memory, and cognition. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101. Recommended: L.PSY-211. 3 credits.

L.PSY-333: Motivation & Emotion
Contemporary theories of motivation and emotion, empirical approaches to the study of motivation and emotion emphasizing application to humans. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101. 3 credits.

L.PSY-341: Interpersonal Relationships
Psychological study of relationships. Topics include: social attraction, intimacy, interpersonal communication. Special attention will be given to the psychological characteristics of successful relationships. Several theoretical perspectives will be included to include: psychology, sociology, communication, and gender studies. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

L.PSY-351: Advanced Research Methods
Supervised research in selected topics in psychology. Students are trained as members of a research team in this course that builds on methods introduced in L.PSY-212. Ongoing research projects offer opportunities for the application of research design, statistical analysis, library research, report writing, and presentations at conferences. Admission by written permission of the instructor only. Prerequisite: L.PSY-212. 1-3 credits.

L.PSY-390: Psychology Peer Assistantship
Students will serve as classroom assistants for psychology professors in introductory psychology or developmental psychology classes. Prerequisites: Instructor approval is required; junior standing is preferred. 1 credit.

L.PSY-394: Internship
Supervised field work in the area of applied psychology. Students should arrange for a field setting the semester before they register. Admission by written permission of instructor only. See internship coordinator for more information. 1 to 3 credits.

L.PSY-441: Introduction to Clinical Psychology
Overview of the methods of psychological assessment including: interviewing, intellectual, neurological, and personality testing; and systems assessment. Overview of theories and techniques of psychotherapy. Prerequisite: L.PSY-101. 3 credits.

L.PSY-490: Senior Seminar & Portfolio-PJ
This seminar course is designed to enhance the professional skills of candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in psychology, skills in idea generation, library research, critical reading, ethical decision making, and oral/written communication. Students will develop these skills by reading and discussing the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct and by researching, presenting talks, writing papers, and discussing current issues and controversies in psychology. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101 and L.PSY-211, and either L.PSY-211, L.CRJ-323, or L.SOC-332. Requirement: Psychology majors, senior standing. 3 credits.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

L.REL-112: Introduction to Theology & Religious Studies
How do the arts, social and physical sciences, philosophy, and daily human life raise religious questions about meaning, truth, values, faith, identity, community and mystery? How does Christian theology respond to these questions? This class helps students better understand both the questions and the answers. 3 credits.

L.REL-113: Introduction to the Bible
An introduction to the methodology and importance of biblical studies, which includes a survey of the history and theology of the Old and New Testaments. 3 credits.

L.REL-210: World Religions: An Introduction
An introductory study of the great world religions, particularly Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. The class invites students to compare and contrast the search for meaning that defines each tradition. 3 credits.

L.REL-212: Roman Catholic Sacred Spaces
How are individuals formed by the physical spaces that surround them? How do the spaces in which Roman Catholics worship inform their understanding of the Church and God? How can substantially different understandings of the Church and God be reconciled within a single Church? And how might these differences not simply be overcome, but embraced. This course involves travel to a variety of Catholic churches and the analysis of the theological function of those spaces that emerges according to their form. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.REL-213: Foundations for Ministry
Frederick Buechner described vocation as the intersection of one's deep joy with the world's deep needs. This course explores theological frameworks for ministry and the ministerial needs of the church today. In addition, the course engages students in theological reflection aimed at discernment and development of the personal skills necessary for effective ministry. Prerequisite: L.REL-112. 3 credits.

L.REL-214: Islam in America
This is an in-depth study course that examines the history of Islam in the United States, with particular attention given to a period that begins at the end of the nineteenth century and continues into the contemporary period. 3 credits. January term.

L.REL-215: Eastern Christianity – Then and Now
This study travel course aims to explore the general nature and essential features of Eastern Christianity by focusing primarily, though not exclusively, on the Byzantine Rite Catholic Church in Ukraine. Site visits, interviews, and guest lectures will help students to understand the nature and history of the key sacred spaces, rituals, liturgical practices, and people (both religious and laity) associated with the Byzantine Rite Catholic Church in Ukraine. Students will also be given opportunities to become acquainted with other Christian religious traditions in Ukraine. 3 credits. January term.

L.REL-216: The Catholic Church in Latin America
This study travel January term course covers the history of the Catholic Church in Latin America and the current issues it faces. The course will primarily focus on Spanish and Portuguese colonialism, liberation theology, and the contemporary period. For part of the course, students will travel to Peru and experience historical reminders of the Catholic Church’s past, but also experience first-hand the issues facing the Church in Latin America today. Prerequisites: L.LIB-130 or L.LIB-135. 3 credits. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. January term.

L.REL-231: Catholic Social Teaching
This course will examine those official documents of the Catholic Church, spanning from Pope Leo XIII’s Rerum Novarum (1891) to the present, that make up Catholic social teaching. This course will study CST’s guiding principles, how the modern popes and the Second Vatican Council applied them to the social, political, and economic problems of our time, and what continuing relevance they have for Catholics and all persons of goodwill. 3 credits.

L.REL-239: Jesus & the Gospels
A critical study of the content of the Four Gospels of the New Testament, as well as their literary, historical, social, and theological contexts. We will compare and contrast their portraits of Jesus, their messages for ancient Christians, and their relevance for modern readers. 3 credits.

L.REL-243: Wisdom of the Prophets
A survey of the writings of the prophets, with main emphasis on the texts and how they were written, on the historical situations which they addressed, and on their continuing importance today. Special attention is given to the writings of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. 3 credits.

L.REL-248: Seminar on the Letters of St. Paul
Using a seminar format, this course studies the letters of St. Paul in the order in which they were written, to facilitate an understanding of the author's theological development in terms of the changing problems he faced. We pay attention to the literary form of the public letter in Paul’s day, his own use of that form, the people and positions he found himself arguing against, and his emerging theological synthesis. 3 credits.

L.REL-251: Does The Land Belong To Israel-AC
The Land promised Israel is both a central faith symbol for Judaism and a constant geopolitical problem. Using this problem as passport into the Hebrew Scriptures (the Old Testament), the course will survey the main moments of the Israel’s story, its struggle to remain faithful, and the writings produced in that struggle. These, in turn, will be read for evidence of present day claims to the territory of Palestine. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-252: God’s Literature-AA
The New Testament is a library of the foundational documents of Christian faith, shaping our lives even today. The course surveys these writings in a series of two-week modules, each entertaining a new problem to solve. To assist in this task we will look at the texts in terms of their various literary forms as well as those occasions, both religious and political, that prompted their writing. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-260: Martyrs, Mendicants & Masterpieces-AC
The course is a January term study abroad opportunity in Italy. The course focuses on the culture of pre-Constantinian Christian Rome, medieval Franciscan Assisi, and Renaissance Florence. We will study the customs and artifacts of each period to determine how they affected the development of Christian thought and practice. We will examine how cultural traditions formed and changed, and how these traditions affected social organization, religion, and everyday life. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.REL-261: Christ & Culture-AC
Jesus of Nazareth has been the most important figure in western culture for twenty centuries. This course examines his legacy by negotiating themes of continuity and change in a wide range of cultural artifacts, from symbols and images to historical accounts and fictional narratives. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-270: Introduction to Christian Values-AV
This course will examine the basic questions of morality and the answers that have been developed by Christians to answer such questions: What are good and evil? What makes an action good or evil? What makes a person good or evil? How should we make moral decisions? Much of the course will involve an examination of important voices from the Christian tradition who grappled with these questions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-272: Christian Sexual Morality-AV
This course will examine the Catholic Church’s official teachings on sexual morality, looking both to traditional formulations and to more recent ways of thinking about issues of sexual morality. It will also examine some contrary positions proposed by Catholics and non-Catholics. The course will also consider human sexuality, marriage, and family life as paths for growth in the Christian spiritual life. Prerequisites: LIB-100, LIB-105, LIB-110, and at least one course from LIB-130, LIB-135, or LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-316: Pilgrims in Their Own Land-AI
Explore the variety of religious traditions, communities, beliefs, and practices that together constitute “religion” in the United States. During the semester, students map their own journeys, recording the interactions they have with people and places on and off campus. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-318: Councils, Creeds & Culture-AC
This course will examine three periods in the course of Christian history: (a) the time of the “Christological councils” (325-451), (b) the time of the Council of Trent (1545-1563) and (c) the time of the Second Vatican Council (1962-present), to investigate (a) the formation of Christian doctrine, (b) the interaction between social/cultural manifestations and Christian faith, and (c) the interaction between politics and Christian religion. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-320: Sacraments: Catholic Identity in Community-AI
The Christian theological enterprise involves the study of Scripture, past theological work, contemporary culture, and other disciplines which engage the believer. But above all, theology must engage the life of the community in which an individual’s faith is mediated, nurtured, and developed—the sacramental life of the Church. How do we understand Christian faith from the past and present celebration of the sacraments? Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-325: Roman Catholic Liturgical Music in Theology & Practice-AA
This course explores the artistic nature of Roman Catholic liturgy by focusing on one of its most recognizable artistic elements, liturgical music. Liturgical music is vital because it fundamentally impacts the experience of worship; by extension, it directs the theological vision that is developed by the liturgy itself. Students will explore the ways in which liturgy and liturgical music enrich, shape, and express the Christian spirit. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-335: Belief, Unbelief & the Good Life-AV
The course examines arguments for and against the existence of God and studies how these arguments affect a comprehension of the moral life and the value of human behavior. The course will begin with a study of “virtue ethics” and will use this ethical theory as a basis for dialogue with the ethics of the non-Christian belief systems of Feuerbach, Marx, Freud, and Nietzsche. Students will develop the tools to make ethical decisions about critical issues facing the human community. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-345: Issues in Christian Ethics-AV
This course will look at the intersection of faith public policy debate, as well as the basic principles that shape the Catholic Church’s positions on public issues. It will examine different sides of important public issues such as abortion, immigration, and the war on terror, as well as how Catholic principles relate to these issues. Prerequisites: LIB-100, LIB-105, LIB-110, and at least one course from LIB-130, LIB-135, or LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.REL-348: Social Justice Practicum
Engaging in approved volunteer work and integrating it with one’s research and study of the theology of liberation. 3 credits.

L.REL-350: Bible & Literature
No religious tradition survives without the help of writers who celebrate, challenge, and even transform its beliefs and practices. This course reads Biblical writings for their beauty and artistry and then examines how the Bible has inspired others to compose poetry, fiction, and drama. 3 credits.

L.REL-391: The Catholic Heritage
An examination of defining characteristics of Catholicism, and their manifestation in theology, spirituality, philosophy, history, economics, politics, literature, film and the arts. An integrative course for the Catholic Studies minor. 3 credits.

L.REL-491: Thesis Writing
Review of theological research, the identification, use, and citation of sources, and the composition and writing of the thesis paper. The thesis is part of the portfolio required for religious studies majors. Open only to seniors. 3 credits.

L.REL-493: Practicum for Parish Ministry
Background information and provisions for field experience in various practical aspects of parish ministry, especially parish operation and religious education techniques. Open only to seniors. 6 credits.

SOCIAL WORK

L.SCW-130: Introduction to Social Welfare
The role of social welfare in contemporary society; its historical development with emphasis on political, economic and social influences. Special emphasis upon the role of values in the development of welfare. Overview of the of social work profession in a wide range of human service delivery systems. An examination of society’s current response to human need. 3 credits.

L.SCW-190: The Working Poor
Through a hands-on simulation, readings, class discussions, guest speakers, and media presentations, students will gain a foundational knowledge of the history of the working poor in the U.S., the theories regarding causation and reduction, and the grassroots efforts for change as they relate to the social class referred to as the working poor. Students will build on this foundation by developing a specific knowledge of the working poor in the Dubuque community. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.SCW-231: Human Behavior & Social Environment
A critical evaluation of the theories of human behavior within the context of those biological, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual processes which determine development and behavior throughout the life cycle. Special attention is given to alternative theories that complement the purpose and values of social work practice. Prerequisites: L.SCW-130. 3 credits.

L.SCW-260: Identity & Alternative Lifestyles-AI
This class explores the development of diverse lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) identities, families, and communities. Particular attention will be paid to examining the roots, forms, functions, and effects of heterosexism on the LGBT population. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SCW-344: Social Policy: Formulation & Analysis
The focus of this course is on the role of the social worker as a policy advocate who addresses social problems in the public and agency/organizational sectors. This course focuses on policy advocacy as an intervention that requires a skill to be learned much like any other intervention skill in direct practice. Topics covered are the historical context of social policy in the United States, how to analyze social policy and understand the government policy-making process and understanding how values, conflicting viewpoints, and competing interests influence social policy. The focus will be on major policy areas and social action. Prerequisite: L.SCW-346. 3 credits.

L.SCW-345: Social Work Research
Students are introduced to the basic steps of the traditional scientific research process. A group research project is carried out following the approval of the Institutional Review Board. The initial results are analyzed and presented to the class. Students are also exposed to alternative research methods such as program evaluation and direct practice evaluation. Prerequisite: L.SCW-231. 3 credits.

L.SCW-346: Social Work Practice I
An introduction to the professional practice of social work with an emphasis upon the values, knowledge and skills of generalist practice. A proactive process of working with individuals and families is offered, including strength-based assessments, cross-cultural competencies and empowerment strategies. Development of written and oral communication skills through the use of interviewing, role plays, videotaping and case studies. Prerequisite: L.SCW-231. 3 credits.

L.SCW-347: Social Work Practice II
This is the second course in a sequence of three generalist practice courses. Practice II addresses practice with families and small groups. The focus is on the group work which entails the deliberate use of intervention strategies and group processes to accomplish individual, group and community goals using the value base and ethical practice principles of the social work profession. Prerequisite: L.SCW-346. 3 credits.

L.SCW-348: Social Work Practice III
This course explores the aspect of generalist practice involving proactive responding to large groups, communities and organizations. Macro skills of working within an agency or organizational leadership, supervision issues, grant writing, fundraising and community organizing are emphasized. Other skills to facilitate meetings, networking, time management, and handling conflict are addressed. Prerequisite: L.SCW-347. 3 credits.

L.SCW-395: Topics
Social Work topics course. Used to develop courses which have not been approved under another catalog number. See Division Chair for more information.

L.SCW-446: Social Work Field Instruction
Individually planned and supervised experience in a public or voluntary social service agency. The student spends approximately 15 hours per week or 210 clock hours during one semester in placement. Some placements will require students to drive their own car. A weekly two-hour seminar is required of all students in field instruction. Application for field instruction must be made in the semester proceeding the semester in which the course is to be taken. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: All requirements for the major completed. Restrictions: Social Work majors only. 4.5 hours.

L.SCW-447: Social Work Field Instruction
Individually planned and supervised experience in a public or voluntary social service agency. The student spends approximately 15 hours per week or 210 clock hours during one semester in placement. Some placements will require students to drive their own car. A weekly two-hour seminar is required of all students in field instruction. Application for field instruction must be made in the semester proceeding the semester in which the course is to be taken. Prerequisite: L.SCW-446. Restrictions: Social Work majors only. 4.5 hours.

L.SCW-448: Social Work Field Instruction-PJ
Individually planned and supervised experience in a public or voluntary social service agency. The student spends approximately 32 hours per week or 420 clock hours per one semester in placement. Some placements will require students to drive their own car. A weekly two-hour seminar is required of all students in field instruction. Application for field instruction must be made in the semester proceeding the semester in which the course is to be taken. Prerequisite: All requirements for the major completed. Restrictions: Social Work majors only. 9 credits.

SOCIOLOGY

L.SOC-101: Sociology in Action
Through hands-on activities inside the classroom and community-based learning in the “real world,” students will be introduced to the ways in which sociologists approach the world. The relationship between individuals and society, ideas about how the world operates, and the dynamic process of social change will be emphasized as students learn to think sociologically. Restriction: Not open to students who have taken L.SOC-115. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.SOC-115: Introduction to Sociology
An overview of the discipline of sociology. The course examines the theories and research methods of sociology as well as substantive areas including culture, social stratification, small group dynamics, social institutions, and the dynamics of social and cultural change. Restriction: Not open to students who have taken L.SOC-101. 3 credits.

L.SOC-216: Social Problems
Consideration is given to a number of contemporary social problems. Sociological principles are employed in the analysis of such topics as poverty, crime, racial and ethnic relations, health care issues, sexism, environmental degradation and other types of inequality. 3 credits.

L.SOC-227: Sociology of the Family
The primary goal in this course is to introduce and explore important issued related to the influential institution of the family. Social processes, myths, and problems facing contemporary families will be examined. While students will reflect on their own family experiences the course focuses on social structures that shape family life. 3 credits.

L.SOC-240: Gender & Society
An exploration of the influence of gender stratification on both the social development of women and men and their personal experiences of social institutions such as the family, the economy, the political order, religion, and the educational system. Special emphasis is placed on the intersecting character of class, race, and gender stratification systems. 3 credits.

L.SOC-250: Aryan Societies-AC
An examination of the complex relationship between personal identity and community. The course focuses on the formation of racial, class, gender, and sexualized identities in hate group communities, the ways in which white supremacists react to changes in their local environments, and how they affect change in their communities. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SOC-252: Self & Society-AI
An examination of the impact of the social environment on individual identity and behavior. The course emphasizes development of self, attitudes and attitude change, interpersonal relations, small groups and collective behavior. Students will develop a stronger sense of human interaction and relationships, and an appreciation for multiple views of social reality that should be useful to their relations at home, with friends, at work, and within their larger community. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SOC-254: Race & Ethnicity-AC
The primary emphasis in this course is on introducing and exploring important issues related to race and ethnicity in the United States. The course analyzes information comprehensively and includes historical evidence in order to better understand culture. Students will explore probable causes and consequences of inequality rooted in race/ethnicity. Students will incorporate an analysis of values, including understanding how personal and cultural values result from social forces and structures, into their examination of race and ethnicity. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SOC-272: Global Inequality-AC
This course examines issues of inequality related to class, race, gender, and sexuality across the globe. Throughout the semester, consideration will be given to how distinct historical and cultural contexts create unique experience with inequality. The study of global inequality will be grounded in a discussion of local values which emerge from and affect larger social forces both within and between regions. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SOC-295: Topics
Sociology topics course. Used to develop courses which have not been approved under another catalog number. See Division Chair for more information.

L.SOC-310: Cultural Analysis
This is a study travel course which examines cultures in depth by focusing on inequality. The course could be offered in a number of different locations. Particular social, political, and economic issues significant to the region of study will be considered. The course immerses students in cultural settings away from campus and includes excursions to a wide range of culturally rich sites including historic sites and museums. Required readings provide a base for students to build upon as they hear from local experts and see many cultural artifacts. Students will hear several guest lectures and interact with guest lecturers and tour guides, and will participate in daily class discussions to critically analyze experiences and information. Students will engage with people from various cultural perspectives to hear first-hand accounts regarding inequality. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 3 credits. January term.

L.SOC-330: Sociology of Education
Education is analyzed as a key social institution that influences and is influenced by the larger society. The course will focus on important, enduring issues within the sociology of education such as social class, race/ethnicity, gender, school organization, academic achievement, politics, and educational reform. Additional issues currently under debate, especially in regard to policy and practice will also be examined. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 3 credits.

L.SOC-332: Research Methods & Methodology
An examination of the principles of social research including the research process, choosing the research problem, constructing social explanations, measurement, survey and field research techniques, and the analysis, interpretation, and application of survey research data. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in the mathematical modeling requirement, L.SOC-101 or L-SOC-115, and 3 additional credits in Sociology. 3 credits.

L.SOC-333: Statistical Analyses
Rationale and use of various statistical procedures including measures of central tendency, dispersion, inference and association. Students gain experience in coding and entering data, recoding variables, and creating composite measures with the use of computer software. Students develop their own hypotheses and conduct independent statistical analyses of survey data. Encouraged for all social science majors. Grade of C- or better in L-SOC-332, L.CRJ-323, or L.PSY-211. 3 credits.

L.SOC-336: Classical Sociological Theory
This course focuses on the major theoretical perspectives and important early scholars within sociology. Students will learn to apply sociological theory to issues of sociological concern as well as to their daily lives. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 3 credits.

L.SOC-337: Contemporary Sociological Theory
This course examines the ideas of sociologists whose work extend and challenges classical theory while also contributing to the current sociological literature. During the semester, students will learn about important ideas in contemporary sociological theory, consider relationships between various theorists' work, learn to apply contemporary theory to the modern world, and consider the relationship between theory and research. Prerequisite: Completion of L.SOC-336 with C- or better. 3 credits.

L.SOC-340: Social Demography
Demography is the scientific study of human populations (their size, composition, and distribution) and the changes in these factors as they occur through the three processes of fertility, mortality and migration. Issues like immigration, population decline in some areas and increases in others, and the aging of a population and their effects will be examined. Students will examine demographic process and consider how these issues are relevant their lives now and in the future. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 3 credits.

L.SOC-355: Sociology of Popular Culture
Popular culture includes a wide variety of topics such as art, comic books, sports, hip hop, clothes, movies, food, TV, or advertisements, this course will draw on various sociological perspectives to critically evaluate the media as an influential social institution. This course will examine how popular culture is becoming increasingly central to social life in the United States and around the world and will consider issues related to race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 3 credits.

L.SOC-375: Social Movements
The primary focus of this course is the examination and application of social movement theory. Students will examine factors that influence movement emergence, culture, tactics, organizational strength, and outcomes. In doing so, they will assess the relative strength and weaknesses of social movement theory as they apply to a range of both progressive and conservative movements. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 3 credits.

L.SOC-390: Social Inequality
This course will familiarize students with how systems of class, gender, racial, and sexual stratification operate in the United States. We will explore the construction, maintenance, and impact of inequality. While a great deal of the course will focus on social class, the intersection of all forms of inequality will be the primary focus of attention. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 3 credits.

L.SOC-393: Practicum
The practicum is designed for sociology majors and minors who desire an agency/organization placement. The primary objective of the practicum is to enable students to link classroom learning to work situations. Prerequisite: L.SOC-101 or L.SOC-115. 1-3 credits.

L.SOC-395: Topics
Sociology topics course. Used to develop courses which have not been approved under another catalog number. See Division Chair for more information.

L.SOC-490: Senior Seminar
A seminar for senior sociology majors which endeavors to crystallize the student’s knowledge and appreciation of the discipline. The course will concentrate upon methodological, theoretical, and substantive issues of interest in the field. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in L.SOC-332, L.BIO-279, L.CRJ-323, or L.PSY-211; and grade of C- or better in L.SOC-333, L.MAT-115, L.PSY-212 or. Open to seniors only. 3 credits.

SPANISH

L.SPA-110: Beginning Spanish I
These courses are designed to develop reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in Spanish at the basic level and place a great emphasis on the acquisition and practice of grammatical structures in Spanish. They also provide an introduction to the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of Spanish or placement or equivalent and permission of instructor. 4 credits per course.

L.SPA-120: Beginning Spanish II
These courses are designed to develop reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in Spanish at the basic level and place a great emphasis on the acquisition and practice of grammatical structures in Spanish. They also provide an introduction to the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. Prerequisites: L.SPA-110 with grade of C or higher or placement or equivalent and permission of instructor. 4 credits per course.

L.SPA-135: Basic Spanish for the Professions
Designed for students with some previous knowledge of Spanish who wish to enhance their chosen career paths with basic workplace Spanish, these courses emphasize communicative skills and “real-life” applications of specialized vocabulary and workplace practices in Spanish at the basic level. Each course will focus on the use of Spanish within one general professional context: business, criminal justice, education or health/social services. Prerequisites: L.SPA-110, with grade of C or higher, or equivalent and permission of the instructor. 1-3 credits.

L.SPA-210: Intermediate Spanish I
These courses, sequential in nature, involve extensive and intensive reading, writing, conversation and grammar at the intermediate level. Students will study the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. This sequence of courses will prepare students for further study in Spanish and serves as the introductory sequence for the major. Prerequisites: L.SPA-120 with grade of C or higher or placement or equivalent and permission of instructor. 3 credits per course.

L.SPA-220: Intermediate Spanish II
These courses, sequential in nature, involve extensive and intensive reading, writing, conversation and grammar at the intermediate level. Students will study the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. This sequence of courses will prepare students for further study in Spanish and serves as the introductory sequence for the major. Prerequisites: L.SPA-210 with grade of C or higher or placement or equivalent and permission of instructor. 3 credits per course.

L.SPA-235: Intermediate Spanish for the Professions
These courses are designed to enhance communicative skills and “real-life” applications of specialized vocabulary and work-place practices in Spanish at the intermediate level. Particularly appropriate for students with a Spanish minor or double major, each course will focus on attaining intermediate proficiency in workplace Spanish within one general context: business, criminal justice, education or health/ social services. Fulfills an elective requirement for the major or minor. Prerequisites: L.SPA-210 with grade of C or higher or equivalent and permission of instructor. 1-3 credits.

L.SPA-237: El Camino de Santiago
This course follows the misty stone trails through the same green lands that legen says St. James the Elder travelled during and after life. Students will follow the Route of the Sea of Arousa and the River Ulla to Santiago, the legendary routes of the Apostle's first trip to Galicia and his final, funeral journey. Into this same time and place students will weave the theme of modern human migrations across the Galician landscape, learning the emigrant/immigrant history of recent years. How do the modern American pilgrim and the modern African immigrant move through this landscape; how are the received by the inhabitants of the place? Throughout the trip students will investigate the efforts of Caritas Diocesana. After two days of work in Santiago de Compostela, students hike to the end of the world on the Route of Fisterra-Muxia. Two days on La costa de la muerte and it's back to Santiago for final presentations and wrap-up. Students will be walking an average of 15 miles per day. 3 credits. January term.

L.SPA-248: Spanish in the Schools Practicum
This course will be experiential in nature, providing pre-service teachers the opportunity to continue to implement specific methodological approaches in second language acquisition, classroom experience, and the opportunity to reflect upon the experience, both individually and as a group. Prerequisites: permission of instructor. 1 credit. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits.

L.SPA-257: Cultural Geography–Spanish-Speaking World
Overview of the history and cultural development of those countries that today make up the Spanish-speaking world. Beginning with a brief history of Spain as a rising European power, the course will examine the “conquest” and “colonization” of the “New World” (North, Central and South America); the colonial period and struggles for independence; the most salient issues of the post-colonial period; the transition into and the contemporary concerns of the 20th and 21st centuries. Taught in English. 3 credits.

L.SPA-270: Advanced Communicative Modes
Higher level skill development and refinement in writing, speaking, and comprehension for students of Spanish. Includes: informal and formal writing (note-taking, drafts, style sheets, research strategies, paper formats) and informal and formal oral presentations (class discussions, group conversations, formal presentations). Prerequisite: L.SPA-220 with grade of C or higher, or placement or equivalent and permission of instructor. 3 credits.

L.SPA-276: La Frontera-AC
This bilingual version of the Advanced General Education course ,“The Latino Experience in the US-AC”, focuses on “la frontera,” the areas along the border between the US and Mexico and includes a 10 day travel component to Arizona, US and Sonora, MX. In this course, we will explore the history of both the US and Mexico and the cultural, economic, linguistic, political and social contexts of this globally unique region. Pre-requisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110 and completion of either L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135 or L.LIB-220. Completion of L.SPA-220 or equivalent and permission and interview with the instructor. 3 credits. January term.

L.SPA-280: Critical Analysis
Using a wide variety of source materials (both academic and non-academic formats), students will engage in activities and analyses that provide them with additional tools and techniques for becoming more thorough thinkers and communicators in Spanish. Additional emphasis is placed on utilizing and processing materials and content that enhance students’ understanding and appreciation of their own and other cultures. Prerequisite: L.SPA-270 with grade of C or higher or placement or equivalent and permission of instructor. 3 credits.

L.SPA-335: Advanced Spanish for the Professions
This level of courses in Spanish for the professions builds upon advanced level communicative competencies in Spanish with particular emphasis on translation and interpretation and bilingual proficiency. Each course will address one general professional context supplemented with individualized projects and materials that allow each student to more narrowly focus on particular specialized aspects of the general professional topic: business, criminal justice, education and health/social services. Prerequisites: L.SPA-280 with grade of C or higher or equivalent and permission of instructor. 1-3 credits.

L.SPA-338: Advanced Spanish for the Professions
Field placements, special community outreach projects and/or applied independent study related to Spanish for the Professions at the advanced level. Prerequisites: L.SPA-335 with grade of C or higher, or equivalent and permission of instructor. 1-3 credits.

L.SPA-350: El Mundo Hispano
This course examines the Spanish-speaking countries and cultures on both sides of the Atlantic from earlier centuries to modern times. Students will enhance their knowledge of persons and events and develop intercultural perspectives. Prerequisite: L.SPA-280 with grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

L.SPA-360: Major Writers
Representative authors from the Spanish-speaking world and works from various genres. Prerequisite: L.SPA-280 with grade of C or higher. 3 credits.

L.SPA-400: Advanced Grammar
Intensive practice in the subtleties of Spanish grammar and syntax. Prerequisite: L.SPA-280 with a grade of C or better. 3 credits.

L.SPA-450: Topics in Culture & Civilization
In-depth study of a particular issue or area of cultural studies. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Possible topics may include the Spanish Civil War, the Inquisition, Evita Perón, the Virgin of Guadalupe, music of Latin America and its influence in popular American culture. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: L.SPA-280 and one course at the 300 level. 3 credits.

L.SPA-460: Themes in Literature
Intensive study of a particular period, region, genre, or author. Topics will vary from semester to semester, and could include Golden Age, Chicano literature, short stories of Argentina, Sor Juana de la Cruz. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: L.SPA-280 and one course at the 300 level. 3 credits.

L.SPA-490: Senior Seminar & Portfolio-PJ
The capstone experience for students majoring in Spanish: in this course students undertake individualized research projects culminating in a formal oral presentation and a formal written narrative. A significant community connection component is required. Students also complete a College Portfolio that connects to the major that will aid Spanish majors in demonstrating the transferable knowledge and skills that they have developed through their liberal arts education at Loras College. Prerequisite: Prior completion of 24 credits toward the Spanish major. 3 credits.

SPANISH STUDY ABROAD: SANTIAGO, SPAIN

L.SPA-376: Twentieth Century Spain: Culture & Civilization: “Civilización y Cultura de España, Siglo XX”

This course will allow Loras students to study in depth the history of Spain during a vital time in the nation’s history. Students will learn about and reflect upon such issues as the separation of church and state, repression and freedom, cultural diversity, artistic expression and immigration, all topics of importance to the informed, responsible citizen of the U.S.A. today. Equivalent to L.SPA-350 or 450 or elective. 3 credits.

L.SPA-376: The Way of St. James “El Camino de Santiago”
This course will allow students to discover one of the most important pilgrimages of the Catholic tradition. Students will study and reflect upon the life and legend of St. James, the evolution of the Camino, and other vital issues related to Catholicism. Equivalent to L.SPA-350 or 450 or elective. 3 credits.

L.SPA-376: Advanced Composition & Conversation
This course is specifically designed to concentrate on language skills while the students are immersed in the culture of Galicia, Spain. The course provides the students ample opportunities to fine tune language skills while reflecting on cultural and linguistic comparisons with their life in the U.S.A. Specific points of comparison will include multicultural society (Galician and Castilian) and bilingualism. Equivalent to L.SPA-270 or 280 or elective. 3 credits.

L.SPA-376: Masterpieces of Spanish Literature, 20th Century
In this course students will read some of the most important literary works of 20th century Spain. Equivalent to L.SPA-360 or 460 or elective. 3 credits.

SPANISH-SPEAKING WORLD

L.SPW-247: Colonial Literature of Latin America-AA
This course will explore the issues of conquest, colonization and empire in Latin America through literature, specifically analyzing the role of literature in the construction of culture. Students will examine the development, construction and transformation of literary genres such as satire, epic poetry, urban histories, travel writing, drama and personal accounts. Students will connect this exploration of genre with cultural and social issues of the 16th through 18th centuries, including gender, race, ethnicity, empire, and creole identity. The connection of literary and social questions will allow students to analyze the mutually constructed relationship between literature and cultural paradigms. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SPW-267: The Latino Experience in the U.S.-AC
This course is designed to provide an overview of the historical and contemporary contexts and issues pertaining to the various people in the United States identified as “Latino” (or “Hispanics,” as labeled by the federal government). We will explore the demographics and cultures of Americans whose history and heritage range from flourishing civilizations that pre-date the arrival of the Mayflower to citizens who have never set foot on the U.S. mainland. We will examine the concepts of ethnicity, heritage, ancestry, race, language, citizenship, and culture, particularly as they pertain to Latinos. We will develop a common list of working definitions and an understanding of the major events, historical figures, issues, and concerns that are important and unique to this segment of U.S. society. The January term version of this course, The Latino Experience: la frontera, includes travel to the US-Mexican border Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. Also counts as an elective for the Spanish major or minor. Taught in English. 3 credits.

L.SPW-277: United States Latino Literature-AI
This course focuses on the nature of identity and community in literature written by US authors who self-identify and/or are identified as “Latino.” The majority of these works raise and/or address explicitly the questions of “Who am I?,” “What does it mean to be Latino?,” and “To which community (or communities) do I belong?” Selected texts (from the 1940's to now) will represent the perspectives of different and differing voices on Latino “minority” status in relation to mainstream “Anglo” culture, as well as varying definitions of self, identity, and community that contribute to connections and ruptures within the larger Latino community. In this course, we will examine the issues surrounding “otherness” in ways that will engender a more sensitive awareness of how we all participate in and are affected by the dynamics of difference. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. Also counts as an elective for the Spanish major or minor. Taught in English.

L.SPW-285: Asset Mapping Iowa Latinos-AI
This community-based learning course that will examine the use of asset mapping as a tool for promoting and creating community action in Latino population centers across Iowa and within Dubuque. Issues of class, race and gender identity are critical to the asset mapping process and will be analyzed in conjunction with the structure of community relations. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SPW-287: Latin American Communities through Literature-AI
This course will focus on subaltern identities and communities as represented in Latin American literature (written originally in Spanish). We will begin with the colonial period and move into the twenty-first century considering multiple Indigenous and Spanish speaking communities. This course will examine the mutually inscriptive relationship between community and identity, the process of formation of communities, and the personal ideologies and beliefs that challenge an individual’s role in a community. Further, the contextualization of the issues represented in the course materials in the Latin American context will require students to analyze ongoing interactions between the self and community in relation to national politics as well as the relationship of Latin America to the “developed world.” Prerequisites: L.LIB-100; L.LIB-105; L.LIB-110; and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits. Also counts as an elective for the Spanish major or minor. Taught in English.

SPORT MANAGEMENT

L.SMG-150: Introduction to Sport Management
This course introduces students to the requisite skills and dispositions necessary to succeed in sport management, the prospective career paths, and current issues within sports and the academic discipline. The course serves as an introduction to subsequent courses in the sport management major and to the skills of budgeting, scheduling, and working in groups. Restricted to non-Senior students. 3 credits.

L.SMG-225: Sports Business
This course will study and critique multiple current issues surrounding sport, business, and capitalism through the lens of Catholic and secular teachings. An emphasis will be placed on how sports companies attempt to integrate e their mission statement into their daily operations and decisions that impact the bottom line. Students will travel to a Midwestern city to visit with sport management professionals at multiple entities. Prerequisite: L.SMG 150 or instructor consent. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.SMG-240: Sport & Society
An introduction into the relationships between sports, culture, and society. This course will examine the institution of sport using sociological theory to investigate the complex interaction between sport and society. Through the exploration of controversies within the realm of sport, students will gain insight into the purpose, meaning, and influence of sport in our culture. Students will examine the ways in which the prejudice and cultural trends of society are reflected within, and influence participation in, sport. Prerequisite: L.PHE-150 or L.SMG-150. 3 credits.

L.SMG-270: Ethics in Sports-AV
Examination of the basic ethical principles and theories employed in the consideration of any moral issue and application to various moral dilemmas in the areas of sports and athletics, including gender equity, racial equity, competition and winning, academics and eligibility, sportsmanship, violence , performance enhancing drugs, recreational drugs, commercialization in sport, amateurism and professionalism, and professional codes of ethics. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SMG-280: Women in Sport-AI
Throughout history, women have "dared to compete" in sport. This course will examine the relationship between female athletes, sport, and community. A historical perspective of the origin and advancement of sport for women as influenced by religious, economic, political, cultural and ideological communities will be used to analyze the changing role of women. The interaction between women and socio-cultural communities in relation to sport participation will be examined, as exemplified, for example, in the struggle by women for involvement in the Olympics. Prerequisites: L.LIB-100, L.LIB-105, L.LIB-110, and one course from L.LIB-130, L.LIB-135, or L.LIB-220. 3 credits.

L.SMG-290: Sport Governance
This course examines the theoretical concepts of governance, organizational structure, policy development and the functions and purposes of governing bodies in sport at the high school, collegiate, professional and amateur levels. Emphasis will include the control the powers each agency has assumed and how the power is derived, the advantages and disadvantages of membership within such agencies, and the current legislative issues within these agencies. 3 credits.

L.SMG-294: Level-Two Internship in Sport Management
This is a three-credit experience providing students the practical opportunity to apply and enhance what they have learned in the classroom. Fifty hours at a sport management site must be completed for each academic credit awarded. The experience is structured around learning goals and overseen by a site supervisor and Loras faculty member. Prerequisites: L.SMG-240; Restrictions: Minimum of 2.0 grade point average. Not open to first year students. 3-4 credits.

L.SMG-345: Admin of Athletic & Recreation Facilities
Provides an understanding of various theories and methods of administration of facilities as well as the legal ramifications involved in their operation. Prerequisite: L.SMG-240. 3 credits.

L.SMG-367: Sport Law
This course is designed to provide students the requisite knowledge of legal issues in the sporting industry. Topics include negligence, liability, risk management, waivers, federal legislation, contract law, employment law, anti-trust legislation, labor law, and intellectual property. Case studies are used to help students apply the material. Prerequisite: L.SMG-240. 3 credits.

L.SMG-422: Sport Sales & Sponsorship
Processes of successful selling and negotiating within the sport-business climate. Study of the development, implementation, and evaluation of the sport sponsorship proposal and analysis of the interaction between sport organizations and sponsorship partners. Prerequisite: L.SMG-240. 3 credits.

L.SMG-450: Finance & Fund-Raising in Sport
This course provides an overview of the financing of the sport organization with coverage of public sector funding, funding through sport revenue, and funding through external sources. Prerequisite: L.SMG-150 and junior standing. 3 credits.

L.SMG-468: Sport Marketing/Promotions
This course is designed to assist students in creating and critiquing marketing, promotion and public relation efforts specific to sport. Emphasis will be placed on the five “p’s” of sport marketing: price, promotion, product, place and public relations. This course includes hands-on experience with market research and case studies to help students apply the material. Prerequisite: L.SMG-150 and junior standing. 3 credits.

L.SMG-492: Level-Three Pre-Professional Field Experience in Sport Management
This experiential course is designed for students who are in the advanced stages of completing the coursework required for their major. This experience provides sport management majors a culminating opportunity to apply and enhance what they have learned in the classroom. Students must complete 50 hours at a sport management site arranged by the student and approved by the sport management program coordinator per academic credit. The experience is structured around learning goals and overseen by a site supervisor and a Loras College faculty member. Prerequisites: completion of at least 9 credits of L.SMG coursework. Restrictions: Open to sport management majors who have senior standing, and have at least a 2.0 cumulative GPA. 9 credits.

SPORT SCIENCE

L.SSC-140: First Aid & Emergency Care
This course is designed to provide Physical Education and Sport Science students with an introduction to injury prevention and first aid. This course provides the potential coach, physical educator, and human movement practitioner with essential knowledge related to basic first aid skills, prevention, recognition, and management of common sport injuries, and the role of various practitioners in the injury/rehabilitation process. 3 credits.

L.SSC-145: Nutrition
A course in the fundamentals of nutrition and how they relate to exercise, metabolism, weight control and maturational development. 3 credits.

L.SSC-230: Anatomy/Physiology I-Musculoskeletal
This course provides an introduction to anatomical terminology and provides instruction related to the understanding of how the body is constructed and how it moves. Topics include the study of the bones, joints, motor units, skeletal muscles, nerves, and blood vessels related to muscular action and human movement. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.SSC-240: Methods of Group Exercise Instruction
This course will introduce students to the components of effective instruction and evaluation of group exercise classes. Aligned with the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines for the four components of health and fitness: warm-up and stretching, cardiorespiratory training, muscular conditioning, and flexibility training, this course prepares students to develop, administer, and evaluate group exercise classes. The course includes the study of key physiological, psychological, and sociological principles and practical experiences leading group exercise classes. Prerequisites: L.SSC-230. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.SSC-250: Research Methods in Kinesiology
This course provides student with an introduction to the techniques and methods of research in Kinesiology. The course will focus on an overview of research designs, methods, and data analysis to prepare students to conduct and critically analyze research in health and human performance. Prerequisites: L.PHE-150 and any FM course. Recommended: L.MAT-115 or higher. 3 Credits.

L.SSC-322: Physiology of Exercise
A study of the physiological adaptations to exercise. Explores the interrelations of various organs and systems related to the understanding of physical activity functioning. Emphasis is placed on energy metabolism, physiological responses to exercise, diet and conditioning in athletics, and exercise training techniques. Prerequisites: L.SSC-230. Recommended: L.SSC-250. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.SSC-330: Motor Learning
This course provides an analysis concepts related to the acquisition of motor skills. Basic research and principles are discussed in relation to motor learning and performance, with specific relevance to the practice of teaching motor skills in physical education, rehabilitation, and fitness settings. This course involves active involvement in laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: L.PHE-150, L.LIB-105 or L.ENG-111, and L.LIB-110. Not open to first year students. Contact the CEL/course instructor for iteration-specific details. 3 credits. January term.

L.SSC-338: Sport Psychology
This course will focus on social and psychological factors related to participation in sport. Topics will include stress, anxiety, motivation, self-perceptions, and psychological skills training. This course aids the prospective teacher and/or coach in understanding the application of psychological principles to teaching physical education and coaching athletics. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101 or L.PSY-121. Recommended: L.SSC-250. Restrictions: Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.SSC-344: Theory of Strength Training & Conditioning
Students are introduced to the basic theories, methods, and practices of strength training and conditioning. Material presented will include basic physiology, designing training programs, and teaching basic movements. This course is intended to prepare the students for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) exam that is administered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Prerequisite: L.SSC-230. Restrictions: Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.SSC-370: Fitness Assessment & Prescription
This course uses a hands-on approach to teaching students the techniques and application related to exercise prescription and assessment. Students create fitness and assessment programs for an individual adult client and supervise client progress over the course of the semester. Prerequisites: L.SSC-230, 322, 344. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.SSC-432: Biomechanics & Kinesiology
This course provides an introduction into the fundamental mechanical concepts of biomechanics and kinesiology that apply to human movement. The course integrates the laws of physics, principles of mechanics, and advanced mathematical concepts in human movements and provides an introduction to the analysis of commonly used physical skills. Prerequisite: L.SSC-230. Recommended: L.SSC-250, L.PHY-210. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.SSC-439: Exercise Psychology
This course will examine the factors that influence participation and adherence in exercise and other forms of physical activity. Students will explore personal and contextual factors that inhibit and contribute to physical activity across the lifespan. Theoretical models and empirical research will be reviewed, critically reviewing existing theory and examining new avenues for future research. In addition, effective strategies for intervention will be reviewed and discussed. Prerequisites: L.PSY-101 or 121 and junior or senior standing. Highly recommended: L.SSC-250. Not open to first year students. 3 credits.

L.SSC-492: Internship in Sport Science I
Internship experiences are designed to give Senior Sport Science majors relevant experience in a related area. Students will actively participate at internship sites that allow them to apply skills and gain insight regarding real world experiences in the field. An agency application form is required prior to enrollment. Instructor permission required. 2-4 credits.

L.SSC-493: Internship in Sport Science II
Internship experiences are designed to give Senior Sport Science majors relevant experience in a related area. Students will actively participate at internship sites that allow them to apply skills and gain insight regarding real world experiences in the field. An agency application form is required prior to enrollment. Instructor permission required. 2-4 credits.
 

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