Undergraduate Bulletin 2012-14


STUDENT LIFE AND CAMPUS RESOURCES

HEADWATERS ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER

The Academic Success Center is committed to the enrichment of the Loras community by identifying and providing academic opportunities and support services to students, faculty, and staff.

A variety of student support services and opportunities comprise the Academic Success Center. For further program information, go to Inside Loras/Academics/Headwaters.

Supplemental Instruction
Supplemental Instruction (SI) is a program designed to increase student mastery of content in historically-difficult courses, while instilling study skills that are transferable to other courses. SI learning sessions are facilitated by a peer and take place in out-of-class, informal settings.

Academic Coaching
The transition to college may require a change in study strategies, strengthening existing skills, or developing new study skills. In addition, to study skills and examination strategies; assistance with mathematics, time management, organizational strategies, and reading comprehension opportunities are available through individual consultations.

Individual Tutoring
Headwaters provides individual and/or small group tutoring in a variety of subjects and locations. The tutors are peer academic coaches, and the tutoring is administered in conjunction with various organizations and clubs throughout campus.

Writing Center
Led by the director and staffed by peer consultants, the Writing Center assists students in becoming more independent writers by focusing on the process of writing. A number of services are available in understanding an assignment, developing an initial draft, and editing a final draft. Support is provided for the MOI critical thinking and writing model as well as strategies for advanced writing in the disciplines. In addition to the services provided in the Center, handson workshops provide specific writing strategy assistance. For further information, go to the Inside Loras/Academics/ Writing Center site.

THE LYNCH OFFICE OF DISABILITY SERVICES

The Office of Disability Services (LODS) serves students with diagnosed disabilities, who request support services and have the necessary documentation to receive accommodations. The ODS has two levels of service, Accommodation Services and the Enhanced Program. Students interested in either level of service must apply and be admitted to the college through the regular admission process.

Accommodation Services – Students with disabilities are eligible to receive the accommodations that their documentation supports. The most commonly requested accommodations are alternative testing (extended time and/or distraction-free test locations), note taking services, and alternative format texts (books on CD or in a format for use with reading software programs). Students must present documentation after they are admitted to the college and meet with an ODS staff member to determine which accommodations they are eligible to receive. The accommodations a student requires may be provided by professors or the LODS. No fee is charged for these services.

Enhanced Program – The Enhanced Program is intended for students who have a primary disability of LD or AD/HD, but students with other diagnoses may be considered. Students interested in the Enhanced Program apply simultaneously to the college (regular application form) and to the Office of Disability Services (separate application). Applications are reviewed by program staff after acceptance to Loras. Selected students are invited for interviews.

Students selected for the Enhanced Program attend a summer bridge program, a two-credit class, Learning Strategies, both semesters of their first year. In addition, all students (first-year and upper class) in the Enhanced Program attend a weekly individual meeting (one hour) with a staff member. Student tutors are assigned if needed. Accommodation Services (see above) are also provided if the student’s documentation supports the need. An additional fee is assessed for the enhanced program.

See the Office of Disability Services’ website for additional information about documentation requirements and the application process.

STUDENT DEVELOPMENT

MISSION STATEMENT

Loras College Student Development is centered on developing the whole person, one Duhawk at a time.

The Student Development Division provides and supports members of the Loras community engaging in meaningful learning experiences. Through this increased engagement, Student Development provides students diverse experiences and opportunities to grow academically, socially, spiritually, and emotionally. As students navigate the College, Student Development assists students in articulating the value of their Loras experience.

Loras College students have the right to live and learn in an environment that ensures their intellectual, personal, and spiritual development. These rights are essential and will be protected against suppression. Reasoned dissent plays a vital role in the College, but freedoms cannot be protected or exercised in a college that lacks order and stability. The Student Handbook, and
the Rights and Responsibilities of students incorporated within it, informs the student body that with rights associated with membership in the Loras Community come certain responsibilities. The recognition of both rights and responsibilities is part of the Catholic heritage of the College. As stated in the Pope John Paul XXIII’s encyclical Peace on Earth, “Those, therefore, who claim their own rights, yet altogether forget or neglect to carry out their respective duties, are people who build with one hand and destroy with the other.” The Student Handbook in conjunction with the College Bulletin articulates the rights and responsibilities that shape the expectations for the normal activities of the College. It is the intent of the College to ensure that students neither lose their rights nor escape their responsibilities as citizens and members of this academic community.

SPRITUAL LIFE AT LORAS COLLEGE

Spiritual Life at Loras College is inspired by Catholic tradition in order to help all persons realize their spiritual potentials. This process of personal transformation is realized as individuals discover their own unfolding life calling as students, staff, and faculty whose shared horizon is the world in which we live, among whom God has promised to “do even greater works” than have already been achieved. In the classroom and labs , in personal prayer and communal worship, in the celebration of sacraments, in reflection upon Scripture and upon service rendered to others, in artistic expression, athletics, retreats, residence life, and in dialogue with varied cultural and religious traditions represented by persons with diverse human qualities and mutual dignity, we discern and express our own distinctive passions and activate our potentials. We help each other become better equipped to advance a more just and loving form of community that anticipates the Kingdom of God announced by Jesus Christ in the Gospel.

CAMPUS MINISTRY

We serve the entire Loras Community by providing:
  • regular opportunities for participation in liturgy and prayer, (Liturgy Committee,,liturgical ministries, praise & worship, etc.)
  • reception of the sacraments, (RCIA, Catholic Confirmation)
  • spiritual and leadership development through retreats, spiritual direction, faithsharing, bible-study, gifts discernment
  • service to the local community and the world (service trips)
  • Catholic Social Teaching and the social message of the Gospels which challenge us to transform the world (peace & justice community, service trip preparation & reflection, etc.)
  • interfaith & ecumenical opportunities (worship, discussions)
  • two themed-housing communities: Koinonia House and Fr. Ray Herman Peace & Justice House
SERVICE, JUSTICE AND PEACE OPPORTUNITIES

Taking to heart the statement by Pope Paul VI, “If you want peace, work for justice,” Campus Ministry offers programs on social justice awareness, nonviolence and peace. Service trips to other parts of the nation and volunteer service in the city of Dubuque provide students opportunities to “work for justice.” All student service trip participants are introduced to the basic themes of Catholic Social Teaching as part of their trip preparation.

The Father Ray Herman Justice and Peace Center is located in the Gallagher Campus Ministry Center (460 Alumni Campus Center). The goal of the Center is to help and encourage students, faculty and staff at Loras to become more aware, better educated, and actively involved in the social issues of the world. The mission of this endowed center is:
  • to develop and expand awareness of the social justice teachings of the Catholic Church;
  • to call attention to injustice in society and to encourage changing unjust systems in order to develop oppressed people;
  • to seek ways of action to promote peace and justice in our personal lives and on a global scale.
Some of the key issues that the Center addresses are racism, poverty, women’s and men’s issues, war and peace, nuclear armaments, militarism, global economy and fair trade, conscientious objection to war, capital punishment, the farm crisis, the environment, and other life issues.

STUDENT LIFE OFFICE

The Student Life Office encourages students to complement their classroom learning by connecting what is learned in class with out-of-class experiences by offering programming, leadership and involvement opportunities. These experiences assist students in developing a sense of belonging, acquiring skills and knowledge, and in developing informed attitudes. Through all-campus programming, leadership development experiences and many co-curricular involvement opportunities, the Student Life Office strives to complement students’ academic development at Loras College with involvement and learning opportunities outside of the classroom. A complete list of services and opportunities is available from the Student Life Office.

COLLEGE ACTIVITIES BOARD

The College Activities Board (CAB) is the primary programming organization on campus. CAB is dedicated to providing students with ample free entertainment options throughout the year. CAB sponsors approximately 60 programs annually, and has sponsored such events as Bill Cosby, Goo Goo Dolls, and Second City Comedy.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Loras offers approximately 60 different organizations for students to get involved in during their college career. Numerous clubs and student organizations concerned with academic interests, hobbies, sports, career professions and various special interests exist on the Loras campus and are open to any student who is interested. In addition, Loras has a nationally-affiliated social sorority on campus for female students interested in Greek Life. A complete listing of Loras clubs and organizations may be found in the Student Life Office.

DINING SERVICES

Students living in traditional residence halls are required to purchase the 180 block meal plan. Students living in alternative housing have the option of signing up for any of the meal plans, including commuter choices, offered. Change, discontinuance or exemption from the meal plan may be made at the time of registration and no later than seven (7) days after the first day of class at the beginning of each semester. To request a change, discontinuance or exemption from the meal plan, the students must complete the appropriate form in the Student Life Office. For a detailed description of dining services, consult the Student Web Guidebook or visit our website: http://www.campusdish.com/en-US/CSMW/Loras.

HEALTH CENTER
474 Alumni Campus Center, (563) 588-7142; Fax (563) 588-7659
Monday-Friday 8:00 a m.-12:00 noon and 1:00-4:00 p m.

SERVICES

The Loras College Health Center is staffed by two professional registered nurses. We provide a range of health services to the campus community including ambulatory care for most general medical problems, health education, wellness promotion, self-care opportunities, and the loaning of equipment. We work closely with many other campus and community services. If we assess a need for an evaluation to a physician or other health care provider, we will discuss this with the client and assist with an appropriate referral and appointment.

ELEVATOR KEYS

Elevator keys are issued through the Health Center after receiving written documentation from a physician that details the student’s need for access to an elevator due to injury or illness.

AIR CONDITIONER

Students requiring an air conditioner must submit an air conditioner request form that has been completed, signed and stamped by their attending allergist or specialist. This documentation must be submitted each academic year. Approval of an air conditioner in the past does not guarantee the continued use of an air conditioner. Due to safety restrictions and electrical load limitations, a limited amount of air conditioners will be approved based on physician documentation of medical necessity.

HEALTH INSURANCE

Health insurance is important. Loras does not currently endorse a specific health insurance plan. Check the Health Center website for insurance tips. Students should be knowledgeable of their health insurance information and the providers the insurance covers in Dubuque. Students should bring a copy of their current health coverage to the Health Center where the information will be kept on file. In addition, we encourage students to always carry a copy of their insurance card. If they become ill or injured when the Health Center is closed, contact the Area Coordinator or Resident Advisor for assistance. Further information is available on our website:

http://myweb.loras.edu/webimages/pdf/StudentInsuranceMemo.pdf

All international students are required to have current medical insurance. Proof of this insurance must be on file in the Loras College Health Center within the first 2 weeks of each semester. If the student does not have proof of health insurance through their parents or home country, the student is required to purchase health insurance from Loras College. The Health Center will assist students who do not have insurance with the process of obtaining coverage.

REQUIRED IMMUNIZATION RECORDS

Loras College follows the American College Health Association immunization guidelines.

All students, first year, transfer, international, and continuing education/graduate students registered for more than 7 credit hours and born after January 1, 1957 must provide proof of immunity to MMR (Rubeola, Mumps and Rubella). These students must provide an official signed and stamped record showing proof of receiving 2 MMR immunizations on or after their first birthday and at least 30 days apart OR laboratory evidence of immunity (Rubeola and Rubella titers and Mumps IgG immune status).

The MMR documentation must be on file at the Health Center prior to the beginning of classes. The Health Center will assist students needing immunizations or laboratory work. Students will be required to pay for the immunizations or laboratory work. Students needing both MMR immunizations must wait 30 days between shots.

Students who have not complied with the requirements will be notified that their registration for the next semester will be held until the requirements are met.

Additional Requirements for International Students:
  • All international students must report to the Loras College Health Center within 2 weeks of arriving to campus to evaluate their current TB immunization status. All students, who previously tested positive for active TB in the past, must provide documentation of this test and treatment. QuantiFERON-TB Gold is the only accepted TB test and must be completed in the United States within the past year. All students who cannot provide proof of the above must have a QuantiFERON-TB Gold drawn at a time scheduled by the Health Center. The test fee must be paid by the student when the test is drawn.
  • All documentation must be in English. All students who do not comply with the above requirements will not be allowed to register for the next semester classes.
  • Although  not  required,  we  highly  recommend  that  students  be  immunized  for meningitis. Talk to your physician about the benefits of receiving the vaccination.


TRANSPORTATION TO CLASS OR TO HEALTHCARE FACILITIES

Loras College does not provide transportation to class or to healthcare facilities for medical appointments, therapy, pharmacy, etc… Information including bus schedules, taxi cabs, and maps are available in the Health Center or Residence Life Staff.
 
MISSED CLASS POLICY

When a student is absent from class due to illness, injury or hospitalization, it is the responsibility of the student to communicate with their professor and to follow the requirements of the professor regarding the course work missed. Penalties for absenteeism depend upon the policy and discretion of the professor, as outlined in the course syllabus.
 
Written documentation from a physician excusing a student from class due to illness, injury or hospitalization is required if a student misses three or more consecutive days. This documentation can be brought or faxed to the Health Center (Fax 563-588-7659). The Health Center will relay this information via email to the Dean of Students who will in turn notify the professors via email. The Health Center will only send an email notification when the student is excused from classes for three or more consecutive days. Professors wishing to verify other cases of student absence due to illness, injury or hospitalization may call the Health Center at 7142. Dates on which the student received care can be verified if permission has been granted by the student; other health information is confidential.
 
In some cases such as mono, a physician may give a student a class excuse with the instruction to attend classes as tolerated. The student is required to contact the Health Center either by stopping in, phone call or email on the days that they are not able to attend class with a condition report.
 
CONFIDENTIALITY

All patient records maintained by the Health Center are private. Only authorized Health Center personnel may release patient records, and then only with written authorization from the patient. Parents of patients eighteen years and older, parents or spouses of emancipated minors, and other next of kin will not have access to the medical record without the written consent of the patient.
 
OFFICE OF INTERCULTURAL PROGRAMS

The Office of Intercultural Programs is a center of multicultural understanding that weaves the Loras College commitment to diversity into the educational, spiritual, academic, cultural, and social fabric of the campus. The Office fulfills this mission through leadership in education that celebrates individual differences of people within the Loras and Dubuque community by providing support for the tapestry of ideas and experience to which each person contributes to its overall environment. The Office also assists the College in meeting its multicultural needs by providing diversity workshops and consultation to campus constituencies. Working with various departments on campus, the director assists in ensuring that the campus is inclusive of all. The Office especially encourages students of diverse backgrounds to participate in its support effort focused on mentoring and leadership development to strengthen their overall educational experience.
 
RESIDENCE LIFE

Committed to the education and development of campus community members, Loras provides housing environments that support and challenge students both intellectually and interpersonally. Students learn valuable life lessons and skills, as well as gain values and principles, from their community living experiences. As a Duhawk, you can expect that Residence Life will provide programs and opportunities for you to grow with purpose at each step of your educational journey. The goal of using a growth centered community model is to help students learn what it means to build successful, safe communities and relationships with others. In the Catholic tradition, the human person is regarded as both sacred and social (US Bishops, Faithful Citizenship). Society is not an extraneous addition, but a requirement for our human nature. It is through dialogue, exchange with others, and mutual service that individuals develop their potential (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2nd  ed.). The College strives to instill the values of accountability to a community and responsibility for self. Our true focus is to help students learn to be successful citizens, so our approach is learning-centered rather than customer-service oriented.
 
Loras College identifies itself as a residential campus, one where great care and emphasis are placed on the out-of-classroom experience. Based on our residential identity, all first year, sophomore and junior full-time students, under the age of 21 by the first day of classes of the fall semester, who do not reside with parents, legal guardians, a spouse or children in the City of Dubuque or nearby, are required to live in College-owned housing. Students are not permitted to move off campus after they have taken up residency, unless authorized in writing by the Director of Residence Life. Permission is granted only in extraordinary circumstances.
 
The residence requirement must be satisfied before the beginning of each semester and prior to a date specified by the Dean of Students. Completion of registration for each semester is subject to submission of the appropriate room reservation form and the registration of nonexempt students will not be completed unless the residence requirement has been satisfied.
 
Exceptions to the residence requirement are granted in only extreme circumstances, and must be authorized in writing by the Director of Residence Life. Students may request an exemption from the residency requirement for the following reasons:
 

  • Extreme Financial Circumstances. Exemptions for  financial circumstances  must go above and beyond the basic reason that college is expensive. Students  must demonstrate extremely high levels of financial need. Supporting  documentation, including income and cost analysis, should be provided. All information is verified through Financial Planning.
  • Extreme Medical Circumstances. Exemptions for extreme medical reasons must go above and beyond basic illness and ailments. Supporting documentation, including appropriate  documentation  from  attending  physician,  should  be  attached.  All information is verified through the Health Center (see section above).
  • Major Life Change. Exemptions for major life change include serious life changes, such as the addition of a spouse or child, returning from military  service, etc. Supporting documentation should be attached.
  • Request to return to commuter status. A request to return to commuter status may be honored for students who are choosing to live WITH parents, a legal (court-appointed) guardian, spouse, or child within the city of Dubuque or within a reasonable distance. If approval is granted, student will be eligible for commuter status at the beginning of the following semester, and is only eligible if living with an approved guardian. Students approved to live off campus with parents, a legal guardian, a spouse, or children, who are found living elsewhere may be billed for on-campus housing costs.

 
A student whose exemption is not granted has the option of appealing to the Housing Board, which is the ultimate arbiter of such cases. Students who are already residing in college owned housing that wish to reside off campus should be aware that if their exemption request is granted, they may be subject to a 50% contract buyout charge and/or loss of housing deposit. For more information, please contact the Residence Life Office.
 
In addition, the registration of students who fail to fulfill the residence requirement without prior written approval from the Director of Residence Life or the registration of nonexempt students who move off campus without prior written approval from the Director of Residence Life will be subject to cancellation or the assessment of the minimum available residence fee. If, for any reason, the student’s registration should be canceled, reinstatement will require an additional payment of $50 and a return to the residence hall.
 
All students living in the traditional residence halls, including Beckman Hall, Binz Hall, Rohlman Hall, and the Visitation Complex are required to participate in the 180 Block Meal Plan. Students living in Smyth Hall, Byrne Oaks Apartments, Lynch-McCarthy Apartments, and college-owned houses (all which have kitchens) may choose to participate in the 180 or 125
Block Meal Plan, the Duhawk Meal Plan, or may choose to have no meal plan at all.
 
ON CAMPUS RESERVATIONS

After the student has been accepted, the Admissions Office will send an application for a room reservation which is to be returned to the Admissions Office with a $100 deposit. The application will be dated from the time the form and room deposit are received by Loras. Room assignments will be made on this basis. New students who wish to cancel their room reservation must notify the Director of Admissions in writing by May 1 to receive a refund. All room deposits submitted after May 1 are nonrefundable.
 
Continuing students reserve rooms for the subsequent academic year in the spring of each year. The $100 deposit will be held on account in the Business Office as long as the student resides on campus. Continuing students who wish to cancel their room reservation must notify the Residence Life Office in writing by June 1 to receive a refund. Failure to cancel in writing by this date will result in forfeiture of the $100 deposit. Once a student establishes residence on campus, he or she is bound to the terms of the applicable housing contract or rental agreement. For specific information contract or agreement terms, please refer to your signed copy of the contract or agreement.
 
The College reserves the right to establish priorities in the assignment of rooms in the residence halls. In case of insufficient campus housing, priority will be given to students required to live on campus.
 
ON CAMPUS RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES

All students may reside in a traditional residence hall, and traditional residence hall options include: Beckman Hall, Binz Hall, Rohlman Hall, and the Visitation Complex. Single sex living is available in the Visitation Complex. A limited number of single rooms are available in traditional housing, and all students residing in single rooms are billed at the single room rate. Students with more than 30 credits and a 2.0 or higher GPA may live in Smyth Hall or the Byrne Oaks Lynch-McCarthy Apartment Complex or several houses owned by the college in addition
to the previously mentioned options.
 
HOUSING FOR MARRIED STUDENTS OR STUDENTS WITH FAMILIES

Loras does not provide facilities for married students or students with families. Married students or students with families while attending Loras are responsible for securing their own housing and should notify the Registrar of this address before registering for the semester.
 
TELECOMMUNICATIONS SERVICE

Students living on campus should bring their own analog telephone along with a base cord for plugging the phone into the telephone jack. Each student living on campus will receive his/her own internal four-digit telephone extension and telephone line regardless if the student is living in a single, double or a suite. Callers from off campus calling a student will dial the College’s main student telephone number, 563.588.7000. A voice prompt will answer the call and ask the caller to dial the four-digit internal extension of the student he/she is calling and the call will then ring in the student’s room.
 
Students may choose to bring their own answering machine or telephone/answering machine combination, subscribe to the College’s Unity voicemail or choose not to have voicemail at all. Unity voicemail will require a dial-in access number to retrieve messages and students will not have a message indicator light. To subscribe to Unity voicemail students will be required to sign-up in the Telecommunications Office located in room 19 Christ the King Chapel (lower level) after arrival on campus in the fall. There is no fee for this service.
 
Students may choose to subscribe to Loras’ long distance by signing a long distance contract in the Telecommunications Office to have your internal extension unblocked for long distance. Students will be billed by their telephone extension and are responsible for all long distance calls made from their telephone line. The College’s long distance rate is 12 cents per minute, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Students will be able to use calling cards from all extensions on campus.
 
CAMPUS SAFETY
 
The Campus Safety Office has the responsibility for the custody and protection of buildings, registration of student and faculty motor vehicles, traffic and parking control, fire prevention measures, detection and correction of hazards, key and lock control measures, escort service, and security control for all athletic, academic and social events on campus. Access to Campus Safety services is available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week through the Information Desk, located on the 4th floor of the Alumni Campus Center.
 
The college’s crime statistics and annual fire report, as made available under the Cleary Act, are available at: http://www.loras.edu/Campus-Life/Health-and-Safety/Campus-Safety.aspx
 
The College assumes no responsibility for loss of student property in any of the College buildings through fire, theft or any other cause.
 
STUDENT UNION 

The leadership of the student body is vested in the Student Union, which is composed of the Student Senate, the Executive Board, and the Judicial Court.
 
The Student Senate consists of approximately 30 senators elected from among students living off- campus, on-campus, and nontraditional students. This branch of the Student Union essentially creates the legislation of the student government. Each class elects a president, vice president, treasurer, and four senators, all of whom act as members of the student senate. Sophomore, Junior and Senior senators are elected in March/April prior to their year of service, while the first year class officers are elected in October of their year of service.
 
The Executive Board is made up of the Student Union President, the Student Union Vice- President, the Procedural Chair, the Director of Finance, the Director of Communications, the Campus Activities Board President, and the Residence Hall Association President. The Executive Board essentially assists in the preparation and execution of the Student Union’s policies and activities. The officers are elected annually in the spring semester prior to their year of service.
 
The Judicial Court is made up of the Chairman of the Judiciary along with two members chosen by the Student Senate and four members appointed by the Student Union President. This branch of the Student Union runs and oversees campus elections and removal and recall procedures. The Judicial Court also interprets and upholds the constitution and its by-laws.
 
The Student Union functions as the voice of the student body, participates in the administration of the college through representation on college committees, and promotes social, cultural, and intellectual activities both on and off campus.
 
HONOR SOCIETIES

Delta Epsilon Sigma, a national scholastic honor society for students and graduates of Catholic colleges and universities, was founded in Washington, D.C., April 13, 1939, and organized in Kansas City, Mo., March 29, 1940, under the leadership of the Most Rev. Edward A. Fitzgerald, then academic dean at Loras College. The ALPHA chapter was granted to Loras College. Juniors and seniors are eligible for membership. Election to membership is based on character, academic accomplishment, degree of involvement in intellectual activities, and promise of future leadership within the candidate’s chosen field.
 
The Guild of Saint Genesius, an honorary dramatic society that carries on a tradition started in 1971. Membership is open to Loras Players who demonstrate dedication, achievement, and contribution to the Loras College theatre.
 
Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor society, was founded in 1920. Today there are over 650 chapters aimed at exposing members and the public to the study of government and issues of public concern. Loras is home to the Alpha Alpha Upsilon Chapter (founded in
2003). Membership is open to juniors and seniors with significant credit hours and academic achievement in politics courses.
 
Psi Chi, the only psychological honor society, was established in 1929. Loras College joined this organization in 1994 as the 830th chapter. Students who are majoring in psychology and rank in the upper 35th percent of their class are among those eligible for membership.
 
Sigma Tau Delta, International English Society. Its purpose is to brevet distinction upon graduates, undergraduates, and scholars, in academia as well as upon professional writers, who have recognized accomplishments in linguistic or literary realms of the English language.
 
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS

Loras College intercollegiate athletic program is a participating member of the Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and the NCAA Division III. Members of the Iowa Conference include Buena Vista, Central, Coe, University of Dubuque, Loras, Luther, Simpson, Upper Iowa and Wartburg. The Iowa Conference sponsors 19 conference championships for men and women.
Loras College sponsors 22 intercollegiate sports for men and women.
 
Loras College places the highest priority on the overall quality of the educational experience for the student-athlete. In so doing, Loras seeks to strengthen the integration of objectives in programs in athletics with academic objectives and to assure the integration of athletes with other students.
 
Transfers from four-year institutions and junior college transfers are eligible to compete once they have fulfilled the transfer requirements, as stipulated by the NCAA and Loras College.
 
Transfers from four-year institutions and junior college transfers are eligible to compete once they have fulfilled the transfer requirements, as stipulated by the NCAA and Loras College.
 
INTRAMURALS
 
Loras College is dedicated to the total development of the student. The intramural department strives to develop the student through a variety of recreational activities where participation is more important than winning. Loras provides a highly organized and thoroughly developed supervised intramural program known as the “80/80 program.” About 80% of the student body participates in one or more of the over 80 activities. The level of playing ability is unimportant compared to the exercise and social benefits. Intramurals complements the student’s development in Christian character, leadership and service.
 
MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS
 
The Loras College Concert Choir, a mixed voice ensemble, rehearses twice per week and is offered for one hour of college credit. While membership is open to all students regardless of their major area of study, an audition is required for admission into the ensemble. The Concert Choir’s repertoire is a diverse blend of sacred and secular music, ranging from the 15th to the
20th century. An active schedule of on and off campus performances and tours are maintained.
 
The Loras College Chamber Singers is a highly selected mixed group is singers which rehearsal twice per week and is offered for one credit hour. The ensemble of 16 – 20 singers performs vocal chamber music representative of history of choral music. An active schedule of on and off campus performances and tours are maintained.
 
Bella Voce is our women’s choir on the Loras College Campus. All entering women are required to sing in this ensemble before they can be active in the other ensembles; however, women of all levels are welcome to sing in Bella Voce. The ensemble’s repertoire is a diverse blend of sacred and secular music, ranging from the 15th to the 20th century. An active schedule of on and off campus performances and tours are maintained.
 
Con Brio is our men’s choir on the Loras College campus. All entering men are required to sing in the ensemble before they are placed in the other ensembles; however, all men are welcome. Con Brio’s repertoire is a diverse blend of sacred and secular music, ranging from the 15th to the
20th century. An active schedule of on and off campus performances and tours are maintained.
 
The Loras College Wind Ensemble, open to all students, is the major instrumental group at Loras. It specializes in only the finest repertoire, from all style periods. The Wind and Jazz Ensembles present several formal and informal yearly concerts, as well as an annual spring tour. From the members of the Wind Ensemble are formed various groups which comprise the Loras College Chamber Winds, ensembles which explore more intimate components of the
wind repertoire.
 
PUBLICATIONS

The Lorian, the campus newspaper, is published weekly during the fall and spring semesters. The Lorian is published by a student editorial staff under professional supervision. The goal of  The Lorian is to report news and information about the Loras College community and developments related to the college.
 
The published “Facebook” of the Loras campus is The Purgold yearbook. It has been published, with the exception of a few years, since 1925. It is a snapshot of all facets of campus life. It is also a record of the people, places, and events of the campus community during the course of one year. It is published yearly by a student editorial staff under supervision of an advisor.
 
BROADCASTING
 
LCTV – Loras College Television is the campus television station available on channel 13. Our motto is For Students, By Students. Every week we produce news, sports, live game coverage, talk shows, and a variety of creative entertainment shows that reach both campus and the greater Dubuque area. If you have an interest in television production, filmmaking, or creative enterprise, LCTV is the right place for you. LCTV is open to all students regardless of major or year in school. Students interested in joining should email jill.specht@loras.edu or call 588-7032.
 
KLCR is Loras College’s student-operated radio station. KLCR is open to all students regardless of major or year in school.
 
Both KLCR and LCTV are located in Hoffmann Hall.
 
BARNES AND NOBLE BOOKSTORE
 
Textbooks, supplies, apparel, emblematic gifts, movies, trade books, Nook products, and backpacks may be purchased in the bookstore. Textbooks and supplies may be charged to student account by presenting Loras student ID card. American Express, Discover Card, Master Card and VISA are also accepted.
 
Students have many textbook options: new, used, rental, or digital. Students can reserve their textbooks by going to loras.bncollege.com and choosing the textbook tab. Next, they would insert their schedule and choose the textbook option that best fits their need.

The bookstore is located on the second level of the Academic Resource Center.

 
ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY, AND STAFF

BOARD OF REGENTS
 
Chancellor                                       The Most Rev. Jerome Hanus, O.S.B., S.T.L.
                                                           Archbishop of Dubuque
                                                           Dubuque, Iowa
 
Vice Chancellor                              Rev. Msgr. James Barta, Ph.D.
                                                           Vicar General
                                                           Dubuque, Iowa
 
Chairperson                                    John K. Schmidt
                                                           Heartland Financial, USA, Inc.
                                                           Dubuque, Iowa
 
Vice Co-Chairperson                     Dennis Houlihan
                                                           Wells Fargo Advisors
                                                           Dubuque, Iowa
 
Vice Co-Chairperson                     Tony Reardon
                                                           Ducommun Inc.
                                                           Carson, Calif.
 
Secretary                                          Stephanie Savage
                                                           Dubuque, Iowa

James W. Bear
The Krystal Company
Chattanooga, Tenn.

Vince Berta
Landmark Financial Advisors, LLC
Bowling Green, Ky.

J. Paul Breitbach
Winston-Salem, N.C.

Greg Burbach
Honkamp Krueger
Dubuque, Iowa

James E. Collins
Loras College
Dubuque, Iowa

Troy L.Cicero
MulticultuReal Communications
New Lenox, Ill.

James M. Davis
Alpine Packaging
Denver, Colo.

Jeffrey Gardner
Windstream Corporation
Little Rock, Ariz.

William Glynn
Intermountain Industries, Inc.
Boise, Idaho

Greg Gumbel
M3G Incorporated
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.

Kathy A. Hannan
KPMG LLP
Chicago, Ill.

Theresa F. Hoffman
Beecher, Field, Walker, Morris, Hoffman & Johnson, P.C.
Waterloo, Iowa

Richard Kenney
Wisconsin Rapids, Wis.

Sha-Chelle Manning
Manti Ventures
Corpus Christi, Tex.

Thomas E. McCarty
Hinsdale, Ill.

Daniel McHugh
Southern Air Holdings
Norwalk, Conn.

Mark Molo
Molo Companies
Dubuque, Iowa

John (Jack) Ovel
U.S. Trust Company
Kansas City, Mo.

Natalie Schramm
Peninsula Gaming, LLC
Dubuque, Iowa

Tom Shey
Shey Systems, Inc. Hiawatha, Iowa

Brian Smith
Argent Development Group
Tarrytown, N.Y.

David W. Spahn
Dubuque Stamping & Manufacturing, Inc.
Dubuque, Iowa

James Theisen
Theisen’s Supply Co., Inc.
Dubuque, Iowa

Don Ulrich
RSI Enterprises, Inc.
Glendale, Ariz.
 
Mike Valder
Phoenix, Ariz.
 
Sister Margaret Wick, OSF
Mount St. Francis Leadership Team
Dubuque, Iowa
 
David Wilson
City of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, Pa

REGENTS EMERITI
Thomas J. Benda, M.D.
Thomas J. Cashman
J. Michael Colloton
John W. Colloton
Donald P. Dupont
Jean Eckstein
Rev. Msgr. Francis P. Friedl, Ph.D.
Paul J. Frommelt
Edward J. Gallagher, Jr.
John C. Gavin
Rev. Patrick G. Geary
Thomas Giovingo
Ray Green
Mary E. Hendry
Sister Helen Huewe, O.S.F.
Kathy Jirak
Joan Healy Joyce
John R. Kromer
The Most Rev. Daniel W. Kucera, O.S.B.
Jeffrey R. Ladd
Allan J. Ludwig, CPA
Carol Ludwig
William T. Lynch
Kevin Malone
Richard A. Mares
Mark McCarville
John J. Mulherin
James P. Murphy
Luanus Ott
Sister Colman O’Connell
Fred J. Pilcher, M.D.
Michael D. Rice
Al Ruffalo
John V. Saeman
Nicholas J. Schrup, III
Michael J. Starshak
Richard T. Sulentic
Thomas J. Tauke
Thomas J. Tropp
James J. Virtel
David J. Vogel
David J. Walsh
David J. Wertzberger
Barbara Sullivan Woodward, Ph.D.
 
ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

HANUS, The Most Rev. Jerome, O.S.B., S.T.L., 1995-
     Chancellor
     B.A., Conception Seminary College, Conception, Missouri
     M.A., Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
     S.T.L., Benedictine University of Sant’ Anselmo, Rome, Italy

COLLINS, James E., 2004- 
     President                                                                                        
     B.A., Loras College, 1984
     M.A. University of Iowa, 2004
 

CARROLL, Mary Ellen, 2004-  
     Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
     Dean of Experiential Learning                                                      
     B.A., University of Chicago, 1987                                         
     M.Ed., Harvard Graduate School of Education, 1991                       
     Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1999

CORREA, Omar, 2012-
     Vice President for Enrollment Management
     B.S., Iowa State University, 1994
     M.Ed., Capella University, 2008

DOYLE, Michael (Mike) H., 2007-
     Vice President for institutional Advancement
     B.A., Loras College, 1991
     J.D., Marquette University, 1994
     C.F.P.

EISINGER, David W., 2012-        
     Vice President for Finance and Administrative Services                                           
     B.A., St. Olaf College, 1974                                                             
     M.B.A., Indiana University, 1976
     D.B.A., Indiana University, 1983
 
JACOBSEN, Cheryl R., 2001-                                                         
     Provost and Academic Dean
     B.A., St. Olaf College, 1969
     M.A., Arizona State University, 1973
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1991
 
JOENSEN, Rev. William M., 2001-                                       
     Associate Professor of Philosophy                                             
     Dean, Campus Spiritual Life
     B.S., Iowa State University, 1982
     M.A., Pontifical College Josephinum, 1989
     M.Div., Pontifical College Josephinum, 1989
     Ph.L., The Catholic University of America, 1997
     Ph.D., The Catholic University of America, 2002
 
REGALBUTO-BENTLEY, Gloria A., 2009-                               
     Vice President for Human and Organizational Development
     B.A., Ohio University, 1973                                                    
     M.A., Ohio University, 1974
     Ph.D., The Ohio State University, 1980
 
SUNLEAF, Arthur W, 2000-                                         
     Vice President for Student Development and Dean of Students
     B.A., Wartburg College, 1989                                                              
     M.A., Michigan State University, 1994
 
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

ADAMS, Robert M., 2000-                                                                        
     Assistant Professor of  Instructional Design and Technology
     B.Mus., Central Michigan University, 1974             
     M.Mus., University of North Texas, 1981
     M.A., Clarke College, 1984
 
BROWN, J. Thomas (J.T.), 2010-                                                                                  
     Registrar
     B.A., Fresno Pacific University, 1987
     M.A., New College of California, 1998
 
COCHRAN, David C., 1996-                                                       
     Associate Professor of Politics
     Director, Kucera Center for Catholic Studies
     B.A., Drew University, 1991                           
     M.A., University of Maryland, 1994
     Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1996
 
IDZIAK, Janine Marie, 1984-                                                                 
     Professor of Philosophy
     Director, Bioethics Resource Center
     Director, Ethics and Values Across the Curriculum
     Director, Catholic Studies Program
     B.A., University of Michigan, 1971                             
     M.A., University of Michigan, 1973     
     M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1989                        
     Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1975
 
POZDOL, Aaron M., 2011-                                                                 
     Senior Assistant Registrar
     B.A., University of Illinois at Chicago, 2004
 
SCHAEFER, Craig W., 1993-                                                 
     Professor of Communication Arts
     Director of TV Studio
     B.A., Loras College, 1989                                                                   
     M.A., Southern Illinois University – Carbondale, 1993
 
WATHIER, Rev. Douglas O., 1991-                                             
     Professor of Religious Studies
     Endowed Professorship, Catholic Leaders & Thinkers Program
     Co-Chair, Catholic Identity Task Force
     B.A., Loras College, 1978                                                               
     S.T.B., Angelicum University – Rome, 1983             
     M.A., Gregorian University – Rome, 1984              
     S.T.L., Gregorian University – Rome, 1988
     S.T.D., Gregorian University – Rome, 1991
 
ACADEMIC RESOURCE CENTER

GIBSON, Michael D., 1983-                                                                             
     College Archivist
     Director of Center for Dubuque History
     B.A., Idaho State University, 1970                         
     M.A., Loras College, 1991
 
GREENBERG, Julie L., 2011-                                                      
     Instruction Services Librarian
     Assistant Professor
     B.A., University of Iowa, 2006                                                                
     M.A.T., University of Iowa, 2008
     M.S.L.S., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, 2011
 
MELDREM, Joyce, 2004-                                         
     Director of the Academic Resource Center
     Associate Professor
     B.S., Iowa State University, 1978                                                           
     M.A., University of Iowa, 1985
     M.B.A., Northwest Missouri State University, 1997
 
PETTITT, Heidi R., 2008-                                                             
     Technical Services Librarian
     Instructor
     A.A.S., State University of New York at Cobleskill, 2000                                     
     B.S., Morrisville State University, 2004
     M.L.I.S., Syracuse University, 2008
 
SMITH, Kristen (Kris) L., 1984-                                                 
     Information Services Librarian
     Associate Professor
     B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University, 1983                                                
     M.S., University of Illinois, 1984
 
CENTER FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
 
BAKER, Maggie, 2006-                                                                
     Service Learning Coordinator
     B.S., University of Arizona, 1993
     M.A., Universiteit van Amsterdam – The Netherlands, 1997
 
FINNEGAN, Faye, 1980-                                                        
     Coordinator of Career Services & Academic Internships
     B.A., Loras College, 1978                                                                 
     M.A., Iowa State University, 2005
 
KEHREN, Mark E., 2006-                                                           
     Associate Professor of History
     Faculty Director, Study Abroad Program
     B.A., Miami University, 1997                                                                     
     M.A., State University of New York – Stony Brook, 2000                
     Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2006
 
ROBERTS, Jeffrey D., 2010-                                   
     Assistant Coordinator of Career Services & Academic Internships
     B.S., Ursinus College, 1977                                                                
     M.Ed., University of Missouri-Columbia, 1980
 
WIEGEL, Abigail (Abbie) L., 2011-                                   
     Assistant Coordinator Study Abroad
     B.A., University of Wisconsin-Platteville, 2008
     M.Ed., Marquette University, 2011

HEADWATERS ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER
 
CUROE, Sister Bernadine, 1978-
     Counselor
     B.A., Clarke College, 1958
     M.A., Loras College, 1969
     National Certified Counselor, 1984
     State of Iowa Licensed Mental Health Counselor
 
GALLAGHER, Lynn L., 2011-                                                       
     Director, Disability Services
     B.S., Mundelein College of Loyola University, 1979
     M.S. Ed., University of Wisconsin-Platteville, 2004
     Ed.D., National-Louis University, 2008
 
KLAPATAUSKAS, Kyle J., 2010-                                                           
     Academic Success and Retention Coordinator
     B.A., Loras College, 2004                                                                  
     M.F.A., University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2009
 
WOLFF, Miriam (Mir) E., 2010-                                                    
     Disability Services Associate
     B.A., University of Iowa, 1985
     M.A., The Johns Hopkins University, 1997
 
PROFESSORS EMERITI

Allan, James — 2008
Allen, Paul — 2006
Atkins, Dorothy — 2007
Bamrick, John F. — 1992
Barta, Rev. Msgr. James — 1995
Bauerly, Donna — 2007
Beck, Rev. Robert R. — 2010
Cawley, Edward T. — 1996
Dansart, Bernard R. — 2000
Eagleson, Gerald W. — 2008
Flanagan, Patrick — 2007
Friedell, Rev. John C. — 1999
Friedl, Rev. Msgr. Francis P. — 1989
Goodman, Thomas — 1995
Hess, John E. — 1998
Kapler, Joseph E. — 1989
Kopp, Jay — 2002
Kraus, Kenneth W. — 2000
Lang, Rev. Charles — 2003
Mack, Teresa J. — 2002
Marxen, Donald J. — 2007
Michels, Elmer — 1996
Miller, Frank — 1994
Morton, Rodger (Fred) — 2010
Mosiman, Steven E. — 2010
Noonan, Gerard B. — 1995
Pauly, Deborah M. — 2012
Pommerich, Robert G. — 1999
Reuland, Robert J. — 2000
Rogers, Rev. Daniel J. — 1996
Rudin, Barry — 2000
Schaefer, Joseph A. — 2000
Schramm, Alphonse A. — 1981
Skurnowicz, Joan S. — 2000
Stribling, Don W. — 2000
Sula, Laddie J. — 2012
Tucker, Robert — 2007
Vogl, Rev. Msgr. Robert R. —1994
Wilkie, Rev. William E. —1999
Wittine, Alfred J. —2003
Zettel, Larry — 2006
 
FACULTY
 
DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
 
BAGLEY, Sara L., 2012-                                                        
     Assistant Professor of Psychology
     B.A., Westminster College, 2004
     M.S.R., Saint Louis University, 2009
     Ph.D., Saint Louis University, 2012
 
BECHEN, Michelle L., 2001-                                              
     Associate Professor of Social Work
     B.A., Clarke College, 1996
     M.S.W., The University of Iowa, 1998
     L.M.S.W., State of Iowa, 1998
 
BELL, Valerie R., 2010-                                                  
     Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice
     B.S., Boise State University, 2003
     M.A., Boise State University, 2005
     Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 2012

CAVANAGH, Bradley (Brad) M., 2010-                               
     Assistant Professor of Social Work
     B.A., University of Iowa, 2000
     M.S.W., Saint Louis University, 2003
     L.I.S.W., State of Iowa, 2005
 
DECKER, Leonard R., 1976-77, 1985-                                          
     Professor of Criminal Justice
     Chair, Division of Behavioral Sciences
     B.A., Loras College, 1974                                        
     M.A., University of Nebraska – Omaha, 1976
     Ph.D., South Dakota State University, 1980
 
DUNN, Robert J., 1984-   
     Professor of Psychology                                                                     
     B.S., Loras College, 1970
     M.S., Iowa State University, 1972
     Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1974
 
FETT, Nancy Zachar, 1995-                                                 
     Associate Professor of Social Work
     B.A., Loras College, 1990
     M.S.W., University of Illinois – Chicago, 1993
     L.M.S.W., State of Iowa, 1997
 
GRINDE, Lisa R., 2001-                                                       
     Associate Professor of Psychology
     B.A., Northern Michigan University, 1994
     M.S., Virginia Commonwealth University, 1997
     Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University, 1999
 
HOPPER, Mark A., 2003-                                                     
     Associate Professor of Psychology
     B.S., Southern Illinois – Edwardsville, 1995
     M. A., Southern Illinois University – Edwardsville, 1997
     Ph.D., Ball State University, 2003
 
JOHNSON, Mary M., 1988-                                                                  
     Professor of Psychology
     B.A., Edgewood College, 1968
     M.A., Loras College, 1981
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1986
     Licensed Psychologist, Iowa, 1988
 
OMARZU, Julia S., 2002-                                                     
     Associate Professor of Psychology
     B.S., San Diego State University, 1983
     M.A., California State University – Fresno, 1995
     Ph.D., The University of Iowa, 1999
 
TENTIS, Dedra R., 2001-                                              
     Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
     B.A., Saint Cloud State University, 1994
     M.S., Saint Cloud State University, 1996
     Ph.D., South Dakota State University, 1999
 
DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
 
COLLINS, Ronald J., 2000-                                                                      
     Associate Professor of Business Administration
     B.S., Northeast Missouri State University, 1984                            
     M.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh, 1988
     SPHR

GAMBRALL, Bernard (Doug) D., 2011-         
     Associate Professor of Business Administration
     Chair, Division of Business Administration
     B.B.A., University of Notre Dame, 1979          
     M.B.A., University of Evansville, 1985
     Ed.D., Spalding University, 2005
 
GRAHAM, Gerald (Hugh), Jr., 1988-                                                       
     Associate Professor of Business Administration
    B.B.A., Wichita State, 1984                                                             
    M.B.A., Wichita State, 1987
 
HITCHCOCK, William J., 1989-                                                     
     Professor of Computing and Information Technology
     B.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Whitewater, 1984                     
     M.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1988
 
KERKENBUSH, Roger G., 2011-                                          
     Assistant Professor of Accounting
     B.B.A., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 1987
     M.S., University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 1991
     C.P.A.
 
KEYES, Mathew A., 2009-                                                          
     Assistant Professor of Finance
     B.S., Webber College, 2000
     M.S., University of Tampa, 2008
 
LAMMER, Luke J., 2011-                                                    
     Assistant Professor of Accounting
     B.A., Clarke College, 2006
     M.A., University of Iowa, 2007
     C.P.A., C.M.A., C.I.A.
 
MARZOFKA, Patrick W., 1987-                                                               
     Associate Professor of Business Administration
     B.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, 1981                      
     M.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1982
 
MAUSS, Ann M., 1998-                                                                            
     Associate Professor of Computing and Information Technology
     B.A., Loras College, 1987                                      
     M.B.A., University of Northern Illinois, 1996
 
SCHLEICHER, Debra J., 2000-                                                                
     Associate Professor of Business Administration
     B.A., Loras College, 1984                                                               
     M.Acc., Southern Illinois University, 1987
     J.D., Southern Illinois University, 1987
     L.L.M., DePaul University, 1992
     C.P.A., C.M.A., C.F.M.
 
STEIDINGER, Gene L., 1989-                                                                 
     Associate Professor of Business Administration
     B.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1976                          
     M.B.A., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1985
 
STURM, Karen K., 1982-                                                                
     Professor of Accounting and Computing and Information Technology
     B.A., Loras College, 1980                                     
     M.A., University of Iowa, 1981
     C.P.A.

UPSTROM, John P., 1984-                                                                          
     Professor of Finance
     B.A., Western Illinois University, 1977
     M.B.A., Illinois State University, 1982

DIVISION OF COMMUNICATION AND FINE ARTS
 
CARROLL, Roy W., 1979-                                                                             
     Professor of Music
     B.M., Muskingum College, 1971
     M.M., Kent State University, 1975
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1999
 
DONALD, Douglas S., 2000-                                 
     Associate Professor of Communication Arts
     Director, Loras Players
     B.S.E., Truman State University, 1973                                             
     M.F.A., University of Iowa, 1978
 
HARRIS, Mary Carol C., 1999-                                              
     Professor of Communication Arts
     Chair, Division of Communication and Fine Arts
     B.A., Marquette University, 1979             
     M.S., Southern Illinois University – Carbondale, 1985
     Ph.D., Southern Illinois University – Carbondale, 1996
 
HINTON, Marcie L., 2010-                                          
     Assistant Professor of Public Relations
     B.A., Samford University, 1991
     M.A., Murray State University, 1995
     Ph.D., University of Tennessee, 2000
 
JEWELL-VITALE, Thomas A., 1976-                                                                
     Professor of Art
     B.A., Loras College, 1964
     S.T.B., Gregorian University – Rome, 1967
     B.A., University of California – Berkeley, 1970
     M.A., University of California – Berkeley, 1974
 
KOHL, Paul R., 1995-                                            
     Associate Professor of Communication Arts
     B.A., University of California – Los Angeles, 1981
     M.S., University of Utah, 1988
     Ph.D., University of Utah, 1993
 
KOTOWICH, Bruce J., 2004-                                                        
     Associate Professor of Music
     B.Mus., University of Manitoba, 1984
     B.Ed., University of Manitoba, 1986
     A.R.C.T., Royal Conservatory of Music, University of Toronto, 1988
     M.M., College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati, 1991
     D.M.A., College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati, 2010
 
MYERS, Seth D., 2009-                                        
     Assistant Professor of Art & Communication
     B.A., Muhlenberg College, 1999
     M.F.A., San Francisco Art Institute, 2003
 
NEUHAUS, Mary Lynn, 1987-                                               
     Professor of Communication Arts
     Director of Mock Trial Program
     Pre-Law Advisor
     B.A., Loras College, 1976                                                 
     J.D., Creighton University Law School, 1979                                            

PISARIK, Patrick A., 1993-                                                    
     Professor of Communication Arts
     B.A., Iowa State University, 1972
     M.A., University of Iowa, 1990
 
POHLAND, Glenn E., 2009-                                                          
     Assistant Professor of Music
     B.A., St. Olaf College, 1983
     M.M.Ed., University of Minnesota, 1989
     D.M.A., Arizona State University, 1995
 
ROMERO, Wendy, 2004-                                                                    
     Associate Professor of Art
     B.F.A., Savannah College of Art and Design, 1999
     M.F.A., Georgia Southern University, 2003
 
SCHAEFER, Craig W., 1993-                                                 
     Professor of Communication Arts
     Director of TV Studio
     B.A., Loras College, 1989                                                                  
     M.A., Southern Illinois University – Carbondale, 1993
 
SULLIVAN, Margaret M., 1998-                            
     Associate Professor of Communication Arts
     B.A., Eastern Illinois University, 1992
     M.A., Eastern Illinois University, 1993
     Ph.D., Southern Illinois University, 1998
 
SWANSON, Jennifer A., 2012-                                                      
     Associate Professor of Music
     B.M., University of Illinois, 1987
     M.M., New England Conservatory of Music, 1989
     D.M.A., University of Minnesota, 2008

DIVISION OF EDUCATION
 
FABRICIUS, Rebecca A., 2006-                                                      
     Director, Clinical Education
     B.A., University of Northern Iowa, 1995
     M.A., University of Nebraska – Omaha, 2000
 
KANE, Janine N., 2007-                                                           
     Assistant Professor of Education
     B.A., University of Iowa, 1983
     M.A., University of Northern Iowa, 2001
     Ed. Sp., University of Northern Iowa, 2003
     Ed.D., University of Northern Iowa, 2009
 
KRUSE, Aryn D., 2012-                                                           
     Assistant Professor of Education
     B.S., Iowa State University, 2002
     M.Ed., Iowa State University, 2007
     Ph.D., Iowa State University, 2012
 
MANGES, Charles D., 2004-                                                                   
     Professor of Education
     B.A., The University of Iowa, 1970
     M.A., The University of Iowa, 1981
     Ed. Sp., The University of Iowa, 1985
     Ph.D., The University of Iowa, 1989

MONHARDT, Rebecca M., 2009-                       
     Associate Professor of Elementary Education
     Chair, Division of Education
     B.S., University of Houston, 1980                                            
     M.Ed., Texas A&M University, 1983
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1996
 
SALYER, David M., 1999-                                                      
     Associate Professor of Education
     B.A., Mount Mercy College, 1981
     M.A., Northeast Missouri State University, 1987
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1991
 
SCHEUERELL, Scott, 2005-                                                   
     Associate Professor of Education
     B.A., Loras College, 1995
     M.A., University of Kansas, 1999
     Ph.D., University of Missouri, 2006
 
WELSH, Hilarie B., 2012-                                                        
     Assistant Professor of Education
     B.A., St. Norbert College, 2001
     M.Ed., University of South Florida-Sarasota-Manatee, 2005
     Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2012

DIVISION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
 
AUGE, Andrew J., 1987-                                                                              
     Professor of English
     B.S., Loras College, 1978
     M.A., University of Iowa, 1981
     Ph.D., Marquette University, 1987
 
JABLONSKY, William J., 2008-                                                  
     Assistant Professor of English
     A.A., Sauk Valley Community College, 1993
     B.A., Northern Illinois University – DeKalb, 1995
     M.A., Northern Illinois University – DeKalb, 1997
     M.F.A., Bowling Green State University, 1999
 
JEFFRIES, Kathleen M., 1997-                                                                 
     Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Cultures
     B.A., Seton Hill College, 1984                                           
     M.A., Purdue University, 1987
     Ph.D., State University of New York – Binghamton, 1993
 
KOCH, Kevin J., 1983-                                                                                
     Professor of English
     Chair, Division of Language and Literature
     B.A., Loras College, 1981                                
     M.A., University of Iowa, 1983
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1992
 
LIVINGSTON, Dana J., 1995-                                                                  
     Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Cultures
     B.A., University of Nebraska – Lincoln, 1984                   
     M.A., University of Colorado – Boulder, 1989
     Ph.D., University of Colorado – Boulder, 1995
 
MCCARTHY-GILMORE, Kate A., 2009-                                   
     Assistant Professor of Spanish
     B.A., Western Michigan University, 2001
     M.A., Western Michigan University, 2003
     Ph.D., Washington University in Saint Louis, 2009

MERRILL, Jean M., 2006-                                                          
     Associate Professor of English
     B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1997
     M.A., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1998
     Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2008
 
POLLOCK, Philip (James), 2002-                                               
     Associate Professor of English
     B.A., York University, 1991
     M.A., University of Houston, 1994
     Ph.D., University of Houston, 2001
 
STONE, Susan M., 2001-                                                             
     Associate Professor of English
     Chairperson, Faculty Senate
     B.A., Emory University, 1991                                                    
     M.A., University of South Carolina, 1997
     Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 2001
 
STRICKLER, Breyan N., 2007-                                                  
     Associate Professor of English
     B.A., University of Sydney – Australia, 1993
     B.A., Seattle Pacific University, 1998
     M.A., The Pennsylvania State University, 2000
     Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University, 2004
 
VANLANINGHAM, Erin A., 2011-                                             
     Assistant Professor of English
     B.A., Luther College, 1996
     M.A., Northeastern University, 1999
     Ph.D., Saint Louis University, 2004
 
WILSON III, Raymond J., 1985-                                                                 
     Professor of English
     B.A., University of Nebraska – Lincoln, 1967
     M.A., Creighton University, 1969
     Ph.D., University of Nebraska – Lincoln, 1973
 
DIVISION OF MATHEMATICS, ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
 
CROOK, Susan B., 2012-                                                     
     Assistant Professor of Mathematics
     B.A., University of South Carolina, 2007
     B.S., University of South Carolina, 2007
     M.S., North Carolina State University, 2009
     Ph.D., North Carolina State University, ABD
 
HEIDENREICH, Jacob R., 2006-                                        
     Associate Professor of Mathematics
     B.A., Northern Illinois University, 1996
     B.S., Northern Illinois University, 1996
     M.S., University of Notre Dame, 1999
     Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 2005
 
KELLER, Robert S., 1999-                                                  
     Associate Professor of Mathematics
     Chair, Division of Mathematics, Engineering and Computer Science
     B.A., St. Olaf College, 1993                                               
     Ph.D., University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, 1999           

KOHLHAAS, Angela L., 2011-                                           
     Assistant Professor of Mathematics
     B.A., Wartburg College, 2005
     M.S., University of Notre Dame, 2007
     Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 2010
 
LITKA, Brenda G. Tuomi 1983-                                   
     Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computing and Information Technology
     B.S., Valparaiso University, 1975                           
     M.S., Central Michigan University, 1983
 
MCLAUGHLIN, Kenneth W., 1998-                                
     Professor of Physics and Engineering
     Director, Heitkamp Planetarium
     B.S., University of Arkansas, 1979                                      
     M.S., Texas A & M University, 1983
     Ph.D., University of Nebraska, 1995
 
MERKEL, Clark W., 2007-                                                   
     Associate Professor of Engineering
     B.S., North Dakota State University, 1983
     M.S., North Dakota State University, 1991
     Ph.D., North Dakota State University, 1998
 
MEYER, Jonas R., 2011                                                       
     Assistant Professor of Mathematics
     B.S, Loras College, 2004
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 2010
 
NEEBEL, Danial J., 1998-                                            
     Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computing and Information Technology
     B.S., Iowa State University, 1983                           
     M.S.E.E., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1990
     Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1994
 
RISSLER, Matthew L., 2008-                                              
     Assistant Professor of Mathematics
     B.A., Goshen College, 2003
     M.S., University of Notre Dame, 2005
     Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 2008
 
THOMPSON, Kristen A. Stauffer, 2010-                              
     Assistant Professor of Engineering
     B.S., Michigan Technological University, 1996
     Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2008
 
THOMPSON, Michael E., 2007-                                                               
     Assistant Professor of Computing and Information Technology
     B.A., Central College, 1998                                   
     M.S., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2003
     Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2007
 
WILLIS, Daniel G., 1992-                                                   
     Associate Professor of Mathematics
     B.S., Arizona State University, 1980
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1986

DIVISION OF MOLECULAR AND LIFE SCIENCES
 
BINZ, Carl M., 1975-                                                                               
     Professor of Chemistry
     B.S., Loras College, 1969
     M.S., Purdue University, 1971
     Ph.D., Purdue University, 1974

COOPER, Kate M., 2008-                                                            
     Assistant Professor of Biology
     B.A., Luther College, 2002
     Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 2008
 
DAVIS, Thomas A., 1989-                                                                           
     Professor of Biology
     B.S., University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point, 1979
     M.S., Iowa State University, 1983
     Ph.D., Iowa State University, 1987
 
JARCHO, Michael R., 2012-                                               
     Assistant Professor of Neuroscience
     B.A., Colby College, 2003
     M.S., George Mason University, 2007
     Ph.D., University of California-Davis, 2011
 
MASLOWSKY, Edward, Jr., 1974-                                                         
     Professor of Chemistry
     B.S., Canisius College, 1965
     Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology, 1970
 
MOSER, Adam T., 2012                                                           
     Assistant Professor of Chemistry
     B.A., Wabash College, 2003
     Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 2009
 
OOSTENDORP, David J., 1987-                                                             
      Professor of Chemistry
     B.S., University of Missouri – Rolla, 1981
     Ph.D., University of Missouri – Rolla, 1990
 
SCHNEE, Fred B., 1990-                                                            
     Associate Professor of Biology
     Chair, Division of Molecular and Life Sciences
     B.S., Brooklyn College, 1976                     
     M.A., Brooklyn College, 1978
     Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 1983
 
SHEALER, David A., 1998-                                                       
     Associate Professor of Biology
     B.A., Colgate University, 1988
     M.S., Rutgers University, 1992
     Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1995
 
SINHA, Aditi, 2001-                                                                    
     Associate Professor of Biology
     B.S., Osmania University – India, 1988
     M.S., Pondicherry University – India, 1990
     Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 2000
 
SPECKHARD, David C., 1981-                                                              
     Professor of Chemistry
     B.A., DePauw University, 1970
     Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1975

DIVISION OF PHILOSOPHY, RELIGION AND THEOLOGY
 
CIAPALO, Roman T., 1982-                                                                   
     Professor of Philosophy
     B.A., Loyola University – Chicago, 1972
     M.A., Loyola University – Chicago, 1978
     Ph.D., Loyola University – Chicago, 1987
 
IDZIAK, Janine M., 1984-                                                                      
     Professor of Philosophy
     Director, Bioethics Resource Center
     Director, Ethics and Values Across the Curriculum
     Director, Catholic Studies Program
     B.A., University of Michigan, 1971                            
     M.A., University of Michigan, 1973      
     M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1989                         
     Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1975
 
JOENSEN, Rev. William M., 2001-                                     
     Associate Professor of Philosophy
     Dean, Campus Spiritual Life
     B.S., Iowa State University, 1982                                             
     M.A., Pontifical College Josephinum, 1989
     M.Div., Pontifical College Josephinum, 1989
     Ph.L., The Catholic University of America, 1997
     Ph.D., The Catholic University of America, 2002
 
OSHEIM, Amanda C., 2010-                                      
     Assistant Professor of Practical Theology
     B.A., University of St. Thomas, 1998
     M.A., University of St. Thomas, St. Paul Seminary School of Divinity, 2005
     Ph.D., Boston College, 2010
 
PITT, David A., 2007-                                                               
     Associate Professor of Theology
     Sacramental/Liturgical Theologian
     Co-Chair, Catholic Identity Task Force
     B.A., St. Jerome’s University, 1997                                
     M.A., St. John’s University, 1999                            
     Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 2007
 
SHADLE, Matthew A., 2006-                                                   
     Associate Professor of Theology
     Moral Theologian
     B.A., Hendrix College, 2001                                                                     
     M.A., University of Dayton, 2003
     Ph.D., University of Dayton, 2007
 
WALDMEIR, John C., 1997-                                       
     Associate Professor of Religious Studies
     Chair, Division of Philosophy, Religion & Theology
     B.A., Kalamazoo College, 1982         
     M.A., The University of Chicago, 1983
     Ph.D., The University of Chicago Divinity School, 1991
 
WATHIER, Rev. Douglas O., 1991-                                                          
     Professor of Theology
     Endowed Professorship, Catholic Leaders & Thinkers Program
     B.A., Loras College, 1978                                                                
     S.T.B., Angelicum University – Rome, 1983            
     M.A., Gregorian University – Rome, 1984
     S.T.L., Gregorian University – Rome, 1988
     S.T.D., Gregorian University – Rome, 1991
 
DIVISION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND SPORT STUDIES
 
GARRETT, Matthew J., 2005-                                                   
     Professor of Physical Education
     Chair, Division of Physical Education & Sport Studies
     Coordinator, Sport Management Program
     B.A., Millikin University, 1992       
     M.S., Illinois State University, 1995                    
     Ph.D., Saint Louis University, 2004
 
GLOVER, Sara A., 2006-                                          
     Associate Professor of Physical Education
     Director, MOI
     A.A., American River College, 1996                                                               
     B.S., California State University – Sacramento, 2000
     M.S., California State University – Sacramento, 2003
     Ph.D., University of Virginia, 2006

KULT, Thomas E., 2002-                                                           
     Instructor of Physical Education
     Assistant Track & Field Coach
     B.A., Loras College, 1997                                                    
     M.A., Loras College, 1999
     CSCS
 
MARX, Anne C., 2011-                                              
     Assistant Professor of Physical Education
     B.S., University of Arkansas, 1997
     M.S., Arizona State University, 2003
     Ed.D., University of Arkansas, 2006
 
NEWMAN, Nate D., 2005-                             
     Instructor of Physical Education & Sport Studies
     Assistant Athletic Trainer
     B.S., University of Iowa, 1993                                                      
     M.S., Western Illinois University, 2005
 
RILEY, Heather L., 2008-                                           
     Assistant Professor of Physical Education & Sport Studies
     B.S., University of Wisconsin – La Crosse, 1998                                        
     M.A., Loras College, 2004
 
SAZAMA, Debra (Deb) S., 2007-                              
     Assistant Professor of Physical Education & Sport Studies
     B.S., University of Wyoming, 1993                                                              
     M.S., University of Wyoming, 1997

DIVISION OF SOCIAL AND CULTURAL STUDIES
 
ANDERSON, Richard (Rick) H., 1995-                                                   
     Professor of Sociology
     B.A., Luther College, 1989
     M.S., Mankato State University, 1991
     Ph.D., University of Nebraska – Lincoln, 1995
 
ANDERSON-BRICKER, Kristin M., 1997-                                
     Associate Professor of History
     B.A., Aquinas College, 1990
     M.A., Syracuse University, 1992
     Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1997
 
BUDZISZ, Christopher B., 2000-                                                
     Associate Professor of Politics
     Director, Democracy & Global Diversity
     B.S., Radford University, 1993                             
     M.A., Southern Illinois University, 1996
     Ph.D., Southern Illinois University, 2000
 
COCHRAN, David C., 1996-                                                                       
     Professor of Politics
     Director, Kucera Center for Catholic Studies
     B.A., Drew University, 1991                           
     M.A., University of Maryland, 1994
     Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1996
 
DARR, Benjamin J., 2012-                                                           
     Assistant Professor of Politics
     B.A., Northwestern College, 2003
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 2011
 
EBY, John C., 1998-                                                                     
     Associate Professor of History
     Director, Honors Program
     B.A., Westmont College, 1988                                                      
     M.A., University of Washington, 1992
     Ph.D., University of Washington, 1998

GAROUTTE, Lisa L., 2007-                                                    
     Associate Professor of Sociology
     B.A., Hood College, 1999
     M.A., The George Washington University
     Ph.D., The Ohio State University, 2007
 
KEHREN, Mark E., 2006-                                                           
     Associate Professor of History
     Faculty Director, Study Abroad Program
     B.A., Miami University, 1997                                                                     
     M.A., State University of New York – Stony Brook, 2000                
     Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2006
 
LORENZ, Amy G., 1991-                                      
     Professor of Modern Languages and Culture
     Chair, Division of Social and Cultural Studies
     B.A., University of Missouri, 1981                
     M.A., Marquette University, 1984
     Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1991
 
MASKAY, Biniv K., 2012                                                       
     Assistant Professor of Economics
     B.S., Illinois Wesleyan University, 2007
     M.S., University of Kentucky, 2009
     Ph.D., University of Kentucky, ABD
 
O’CONNOR, Dennis A., 1983-                                                              
     Professor of Economics
     B.S., Creighton University, 1973
     M.A., American University, 1978
     M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1983
     Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1984
 
PARKS, Kathrin (Kate) A., 2007-                                             
     Assistant Professor of Sociology
     B.A., Loras College, 1998
     M.S., Texas A&M University, 2003
     Ph.D., Texas A&M University, 2007
 
SALVATERRA, David L., 1980-                                                                  
     Professor of History
     B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1975
     M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1977
     Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1983
 
SMITH, Cynthia L., 1990-                             
     Associate Professor of Greek and Roman Studies
     B.A., Gettysburg College, 1974
     M.S., Indiana University – South Bend, 1984
     M.A., University of Iowa, 1993
     Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1999
 
SMITH, Jennifer J., 2009-                                                      
     Associate Professor of Economics
     B.S., Illinois State University, 1995
     M.S., Illinois State University, 1997
     Ph.D., Northern Illinois University, 2008
 
ZHU, Lee S., 2000-                                                                      
     Associate Professor of History
     M.A., Fudan University, 1981
     M.A., Fudan University, 1981
     Ph.D., State University of New York – Stony Brook, 1996
 
INDEX

- A -

Academic Advisement ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 28
Academic Policies ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 27
Academic Programs of Study .......................................................................................................................................................................... 70
   MAJOR
     Accounting ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 77
     Art & Digital Design ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 71
     Athletic Training ...........................................................................................................................................................................................122
     Biochemistry .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 84
     Biological Research .....................................................................................................................................................................................75
     Biology ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 74
     Business......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 77
     Chemistry ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 85
     Chemistry (ACS Certified) ........................................................................................................................................................................... 86
     Computer Science........................................................................................................................................................................................ 91
     Criminal Justice ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 92
     Economics ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 93
     Elementary Education ................................................................................................................................................................................. 98
     Engineering ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 100
     English-Creative Writing............................................................................................................................................................................ 101
     English-Literature....................................................................................................................................................................................... 101
     Finance ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 78
     History .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 107
     International Studies................................................................................................................................................................................... 110
     Liberal Studies............................................................................................................................................................................................. 112
     Management ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 79
     Management of Information Science ........................................................................................................................................................ 80
     Marketing ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 79
     Mathematics ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 112
     Media Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 87
     Music (B.A.)................................................................................................................................................................................................... 115
     Music (B.M.) ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 114
     Neuroscience .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 118
     Philosophy ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 119
     Physical Education .................................................................................................................................................................................... 123
     Politics .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 127
     Psychology .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 128
     Public Relations............................................................................................................................................................................................ 88
     Religious Studies ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 130
     Secondary Education ................................................................................................................................................................................... 99
     Social Work ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 133
     Sociology....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 134
     Spanish ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 136
     Sport Management-Business ................................................................................................................................................................. 124
     Sport Management-Public Relations ..................................................................................................................................................... 125
     Sport Science .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 125
   MINOR
     Accounting ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 81
     Archaeology and Cultural Heritage Interpretation .................................................................................................................................. 71
     Biology ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 76
     Business......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 81
     Catholic Studies............................................................................................................................................................................................ 82
     Chemistry ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 86
     Computer Science........................................................................................................................................................................................ 91
     Criminal Justice ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 93
     Economics ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 94
     Engineering ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 101
     English.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 103
     Gender Studies .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 106
     Greek and Roman Studies ...................................................................................................................................................................... 107
     History .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 108
     International Studies................................................................................................................................................................................... 111
     Iowa Coaching............................................................................................................................................................................................. 126
     Irish Studies ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 111
     Journalism ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 88
     Management of Information Science ........................................................................................................................................................ 81
     Mathematics ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 113
     Media Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 89
     Music-Instrumental .................................................................................................................................................................................... 115
     Music-Liturgical ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 116
     Music-Vocal/Choral..................................................................................................................................................................................... 116
     Philosophy ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 120
     Politics .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 127
     Psychology .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 129
     Public Relations............................................................................................................................................................................................ 90
     Publishing ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 104
     Religious Studies ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 131
     Sociology....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 135
     Spanish ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 136
     Studio Art ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 72
     Theatre............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 90
Academic Resource Center............................................................................................................................................................................. 13
Administration & Staff...................................................................................................................................................................................... 256
Admission Requirements ............................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Advanced General Education Course Requirements................................................................................................................................. 55
Advanced General Education Courses .................................................................................................................................................. 13, 59
Aesthetic Dimension-AA Courses ................................................................................................................................................................. 59
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employment ...................................................................................................................................... 15
Application Procedure ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 19
Assessment Requirements ............................................................................................................................................................................ 50
Associate of Arts Degree Requirements ...................................................................................................................................................... 52
Athletics ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 250
Audit Grade ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 43

-B -

Barnes and Noble Bookstore ....................................................................................................................................................................... 252
Board of Regents............................................................................................................................................................................................. 253
Bookstore ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 252
Breitbach Catholic Thinkers and Leaders Program ................................................................................................................................... 64
Broadcasting .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 252

- C -

Catholic Tradition-MC Courses ...................................................................................................................................................................... 59
Classification of Students ................................................................................................................................................................................ 27
Cluster Requirement ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 57
College Activies Board (CAB) ....................................................................................................................................................................... 244
College Writing-FW Courses .......................................................................................................................................................................... 58
Communication-FS Courses .......................................................................................................................................................................... 58
Cost, Tuition........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 22
Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 137
     Accounting ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 137
     Art .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 140
     Art & Digital Design .................................................................................................................................................................................... 138
     Athletic Training .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 143
     Biology .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 144
     Business...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 149
     Catholic Studies ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 153
     Chemistry .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 153
     Communication Arts .................................................................................................................................................................................. 157
     Computing and Information Technology................................................................................................................................................. 163
     Criminal Justice.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 166
     Economics .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 169
     Education...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 171
     Engineering ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 178
     English.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 180
     Experiential Learning................................................................................................................................................................................. 188
     Greek/Latin .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 189
     History............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 191
     Honors ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 190
     International Studies.................................................................................................................................................................................. 201
     Liberal Arts................................................................................................................................................................................................... 201
     Mathematics ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 204
     Music............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 207
     Neuroscience .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 211
     Philosophy.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 211
     Physical Education .................................................................................................................................................................................... 214
     Physics.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 217
     Politics........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 218
     Psychology .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 221
     Religious Studies....................................................................................................................................................................................... 224
     Social Work ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 228
     Sociology....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 230
     Spanish ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 232
     Spanish Speaking World .......................................................................................................................................................................... 235
     Spanish Study Abroad ............................................................................................................................................................................... 235
Cross-Registration, Tri-College ..................................................................................................................................................................... 29
Cultural Traditions-AC Courses ..................................................................................................................................................................... 60

- D -

Declaration of Major Policy................................................................................................................................................................................ 28
Degree Requirements...................................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Delta Epsilon Sigma ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 250
Democracy & Diversity-MD Courses ............................................................................................................................................................. 59
Dining Services ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 244
Dismissal from Class ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 36
Dispositions........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 11

- E -

Entrance Requirements, General .................................................................................................................................................................. 18
Equal Opportunity Employment ...................................................................................................................................................................... 15

- F -

Faculty................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 259
Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) ...................................................................................................................................... 16
Fees ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 22
First Year Student Admission Requirements .............................................................................................................................................. 19
Formulation of Academic Policy ..................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Foundational Courses Requirements .......................................................................................................................................................... 54

- G -

General Education Program ........................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Goals .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Grades ................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 42
Graduate Courses, Policy on Admission of Undergraduates .................................................................................................................. 50
Graduation Ceremony Requirements ........................................................................................................................................................... 52
Graduation Honors............................................................................................................................................................................................ 52

- H -

Health Center ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 244
History of Loras College................................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Honor Societies ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 250
Humanity in the Physical Universe-AH Courses ......................................................................................................................................... 60

- I -

Identity and Community-AI Courses .............................................................................................................................................................. 61
Incomplete Grade............................................................................................................................................................................................... 42
Individualized Majors ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 67
Information, Release of..................................................................................................................................................................................... 16
Insurance ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 23
Intercollegiate Athletics .................................................................................................................................................................................. 250
Internships........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 41
Intramurals ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 251

- J -

January Term....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 62

- L -

Liberal Arts General Education ....................................................................................................................................................................... 12
Library................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 13

- M -

Major, Policy on Declaration of......................................................................................................................................................................... 28
Mathematical Modeling-FM Courses.............................................................................................................................................................. 58
Military Science .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 67
Minors .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 28
Mission Courses......................................................................................................................................................................................... 13, 59
Mission Courses Requirements..................................................................................................................................................................... 55
Mission of the College ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Modes of Inquiry.................................................................................................................................................................................. 12, 55, 201
Modes of Inquiry Course .................................................................................................................................................................................. 58
Musical Organizations .................................................................................................................................................................................... 251

- N -

Nondiscrimination Policy ................................................................................................................................................................................. 15

- P -

Pass/Fail Grade ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 43
Payment of Fees ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 22
Pi Sigma Alpha ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 250
Policy on Participation in Graduation Ceremonies ..................................................................................................................................... 52
Portfolio Course ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 62
Pre-Health Science Professions .................................................................................................................................................................... 67
Pre-Law Program .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 67
Preprofessional Program ................................................................................................................................................................................ 67
Programming, Leadership & Involvement ................................................................................................................................................. 243
Psi Chi ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 250
Publications...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 252

- R -

Regents, Board of............................................................................................................................................................................................ 253
Registration ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 29
Requirements, Admission ...............................................................................................................................................................................18
Requirements, Degree..................................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Residential Facilities ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 248
Returning Student Admission Requirements ....................................................................................................................................... 20, 21
Right to Privacy (FERPA)................................................................................................................................................................................... 16

- S -

Scholarships and Awards ............................................................................................................................................................................... 24
Second Degree Student Admission Requirements ................................................................................................................................... 20
Seminary Student Admission Requirements .............................................................................................................................................. 21
Sexual Harassment Policy................................................................................................................................................................................ 15
Sigma Tau Delta............................................................................................................................................................................................... 250
Special Academic Programs and Majors ..................................................................................................................................................... 64
Special Student Admission Requirements .................................................................................................................................................. 27
Sport Management ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 237
Sport Science ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 238
Staff Member Listing ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 256
St. Pius X Seminary ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 21
Student Classification....................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
Student Organizations .................................................................................................................................................................................... 244
Student Records ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 45
Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act ....................................................................................................................................... 15
Student Union .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 249
Summer Session............................................................................................................................................................................................... 50

- T -

Teacher Licensure Programs ......................................................................................................................................................................... 94
Technology Resources .................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
Telecommunications Service ................................................................................................................................................................. 14, 249
Transcripts of Academic Records .................................................................................................................................................................. 45
Transfer Credit Policy ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
Transfer Student Admission Requirements ................................................................................................................................................ 19
Tri-College Cross-Registration ...................................................................................................................................................................... 29
Tuition Fees......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 22

- V -

Values and Decision Making-AV Courses .................................................................................................................................................... 61
Vision ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 11

- W -

Withdraw from a Course .................................................................................................................................................................................. 43


 

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